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Country Cups Tipping Comp - Comps & Clubs - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Country Cups Tipping Comp  (Read 135006 times)

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Online Gintara

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« 2022-May-15, 12:30 PM Reply #900 »
I like Parkes, plenty of pubs, nice golf course too.

Good plan if they could pull off the transport hub  :chin:

Parkes is a town in the Central West region of New South Wales, Australia. It is the main settlement in the local government area of Parkes Shire. Parkes had a population of 11,224 as at 30 June 2018.[1]

With the presence of the nearby Parkes Observatory, Parkes has had an important role in the scientific community. In addition to local research conducted at the radio telescope, Parkes scientists have assisted NASA for several missions as a Southern Hemisphere relay and communications station. The movie The Dish was based somewhat loosely on the role the telescope played during the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing. The Dish, although set in Parkes, was largely filmed in Forbes' historic precinct. This is due to very few historic buildings remaining in Parkes. Parkes is also home to the Parkes Spacemen rugby league club.

Agriculture is one of the primary industries in the Parkes region, particularly cropping, sheep farming and cattle farming.

The area also features a copper and gold mine, Northparkes Mine, 27 km north-north-west of the town.

Parkes became a key country location after the completion of the railway to Broken Hill in 1927, serving as a hub for a great deal of passenger and freight transport until the 1980s. Unfortunately, as successive governments reduced the NSW country rail systems, this part of the economy was largely lost to the community.

Periodically governments and businesses have raised the topic of an "inland port" whereby Parkes Regional Airport would be expanded considerably to serve as a starting point for domestic and international freight destined for areas in NSW, Victoria and Queensland. Environmental studies are complete, development consents are in place, contracts have been exchanged, some properties have changed hands and studies are continuing.

Parkes Shire Council, with approval from the State Government, has rezoned 516 hectares of agricultural and industrial land on the western edge of the town for the development of the Parkes National Logistics Hub[16] with an additional reserve of over 100 hectares. The site has been specifically designed for the 24-hour, 7-day-per-week operation of a multi-modal transport facility. 






Casterton
/ˈkɑːstətən, ˈks-/[2] is a town in Victoria, Australia, located on the Glenelg Highway, 42 kilometres east of the South Australian border, in the Shire of Glenelg. The Glenelg River passes through the town. Casterton is named after the village of Casterton in south-east Cumbria in England.[3]

The township of Casterton began on the crossing site of the Glenelg River, the location having been surveyed in 1840, and the first pub, the Glenelg Inn, was established in 1846 with a post-office opening the following year.[4] The early history of the region was marred by violent clashes between settlers and Indigenous people, including multiple murders of Aboriginals that took place near Casterton in the late 1830s and early 1840s.[6]

In 1891, a large number of Casterton women signed the Women's Suffrage Petition to be tabled in the Victorian Parliament to grant women the right to vote (which was not allowed until 1908).[7] By the 1890s, increasing soil erosion saw wheat-farming around Casterton begin to decline and it was largely replaced by meat, wool and dairy farming. Casterton's population expanded in the early 20th century, especially in the 1920s with the arrival of large numbers of soldier-settler farmers and during the post-war era in the 1950s.

The Rail line to Casterton was closed 12 September 1977.[8]

The town's population began to decline in the 1990s which was consistent with the statewide trend of decreasing populations in many rural areas and the ageing of the local population. The 2016 census indicated the average age of Casterton's population was 55.[9]

The kelpie

Casterton lays claim to be the birthplace of the breed of working dog known as the kelpie, a Scottish term meaning 'Water Sprite' and a name given to a black and tan bitch British working collie owned by Scotsman George Patterson, a farmer who lived north of Casterton in the 1870s. Patterson exchanged 'Kelpie' for a horse and the dog's new owner, a drover named Jack Gleeson, took her to Ardlethan, NSW where she mated with a black male Rutherford Sheepdog named 'Moss', producing several litters. Kelpie later mated with another male named 'Caesar', producing a female pup named 'King's Kelpie' which grew to become a champion sheepdog.

The breed was further developed and refined during the next few decades. Ardlethan also lays claim to be the birthplace of the breed.[19]

In 1997, a working dog auction was held in Casterton, an annual event which grew to become the Casterton Kelpie Festival in 2001. The auction and festival event is now held each June in Casterton.[20]

To mark Casterton's 150th anniversary celebrations in 1996, a bronze sculpture of a kelpie by artist Peter Corlett was unveiled in front of Casterton's Town Hall.[21]

The Fleur de Lys

A large version of the Fleur de Lys, used as the emblem of the Scouts, is carved into Toorak Hill, a steep hill overlooking the eastern end of Casterton's main thoroughfare. The design has a circumference of 91 metres.[22] In 1935, the Boy-Scouts and Cubs, in honour of the Silver Jubilee Celebrations of King George V, carved a large-scale version of the words 'The King' into the hill, each letter some six metres long. Encouraged by the success of this, the Scouts, to celebrate the 1941 opening of the town's new Scout-hall, carved the Fleur de Lys emblem into the hill and lit it up at night with the aid of a series of tins filled with oil-soaked rags which were set alight. Years later, the design was lit by electric strip lighting and is illuminated on most evenings throughout the year.[23]
« Last Edit: 2022-May-15, 12:32 PM by Gintara »

Online Gintara

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« 2022-May-15, 12:36 PM Reply #901 »
Casterton #4 Lorente

Offline fours

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« 2022-May-15, 03:00 PM Reply #902 »
Casterton #8 Prospectus

Fours

Offline fours

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« 2022-May-15, 03:08 PM Reply #903 »
Gilgandra #8 Slatey Bay

Fours

Online Gintara

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« 2022-May-28, 10:22 PM Reply #904 »
Big day for the Cups -

Gunnedah, Millicent & the previously postponed Wellington.

Online wily ole dog

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« 2022-May-29, 09:44 AM Reply #905 »
Wellington #18 Ecker Road
Millicent #4 Brigadier

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2022-May-29, 10:49 AM Reply #906 »
Gunnedah R7 #6 Aesop's Fable
Wellington R8 #5 Siqaab

Online Gintara

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« 2022-May-29, 01:02 PM Reply #907 »
Wellington abandoned after race 1  :/

Gunnedah #1 Two Big Fari

Online Gintara

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« 2022-May-29, 01:08 PM Reply #908 »
I like Gunnedah, small enough that it retains that country feel.

Gunnedah /ˈɡʌnədɑː/[2] is a town in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia and is the seat of the Gunnedah Shire local government area. In the 2016 census the town recorded a population of 9,726.[1] Gunnedah is situated within the Liverpool Plains, a fertile agricultural region, with 80% of the surrounding shire area devoted to farming. The Namoi River flows west then north-west through the town providing water beneficial to agricultural operations in the area.

The Gunnedah area is a significant producer of cotton, coal, beef, lamb and pork, and cereal and oilseed grains. Gunnedah is also home to AgQuip, Australia's largest annual agricultural field day.[3]

Gunnedah is located on the Oxley and Kamilaroi Highways providing convenient road links to much of the northern sector of the state including to the regional centre Tamworth, 75 kilometres (47 mi) distant. The town has a station on the Mungindi railway line and is served by the daily NSW TrainLink Xplorer passenger service to and from Sydney and Moree.

It claims the title "Koala Capital of World".

In recent years the local shire council has moved away from this promotional tagline and there are concerns over the health of the local koala population and the impacts of climate change and local mining developments on koala habitat.  :dry:


Gunnedah and the surrounding areas were originally inhabited by Aboriginal Australians speaking the Kamilaroi (Gamilaraay) language. The name of the town in Kamilaroi means "Place of White Stones".[4] The area now occupied by the town was settled by European sheep farmers in 1833 or 1834. With settlement in the area focused on wool production, Gunnedah was initially known as 'The Woolshed' until taking its name from the local Indigenous people who called themselves the Gunn-e-darr,[5] the most famous of whom was Cumbo Gunnerah.

Dorothea Mackellar wrote her famous poem My Country (popularly known as I Love a Sunburnt Country) about her family's farm near Gunnedah.[5][6] This is remembered by the annual Dorothea Mackellar Poetry Awards for school students held in Gunnedah.

The town is the home town of supermodels Miranda Kerr and Erica Packer.

Coal was discovered on Black Jack Hill in 1877.[7] By 1891, 6,000 tons of coal had been raised from shafts. The Gunnedah Colliery Company was registered in May 1899 and by 22 June a private railway some 5.7 kilometres (3.5 mi) in length had been completed from the railway station to their mine. In September 1957, the Government Railway took over the working of the line.[8]

In early 2012, Gunnedah experienced a mining boom resulting in rental properties being leased by mining companies for up to $1,350 per week



Can't say I've ever been through Millicent  :chin: but safe to say I know know where the toilet paper comes from  :shy:

Millicent is a town in the Australian state of South Australia located about 399 kilometres (248 mi) south-east of the state capital of Adelaide and about 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of the regional centre of Mount Gambier. In the 2011 census, the population was 5,024.[8]

The town is home to the Millicent National Trust Museum, Millicent Library & Gallery, Millicent Civic & Arts Centre, the South East Family History Group, and more attractions where locals commonly go to. Millicent is also nearby to the Tantanoola Caves Conservation Park and the Canunda National Park.

Close by is Lake Bonney SE which is home to South Australia's largest wind turbine farm. Millicent is also home to a man-made lake, Lake McIntyre, home to many bird and wildlife species. Lake McIntyre takes approximately 20 minutes to walk around, and the lake also hosts over 50 species of water birds and waders.[9]
Contents

 
History

Millicent was proclaimed in 1870 after a township developed on the limestone ridge in the centre of the newly drained Millicent flats. It is named after Millecent Glen (ne Short), wife of one of the early pioneers and daughter of the first Anglican Bishop of Adelaide, Augustus Short. The town name was spelt wrong and was originally meant to be called 'Millecent' but a mistake sent to the government of the town's name was 'Millicent'.[10]

Millicent is also home to a Kimberly Clark Australia paper mill which is located 10 km away from the town;[11] it is the largest employer in the area with approximately 400 employees. The factory produces Kleenex, Cottonelle and Viva product lines for the Australian and some regional overseas markets. Millicent is also well known for its primary production, which include many varied crops. Pine and blue gum plantation cover large areas. It is also home to the only seaweed harvesting and processing plant in South Australia.[12][13]



Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-03, 11:31 AM Reply #909 »
Wellington Cup being run at Dubbo today after recent wash out.


R9: #4 Sibaaq


Offline fours

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« 2022-Jun-03, 04:03 PM Reply #910 »
Wellington Cup R9:9

Rule The World

Fours

Offline fours

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« 2022-Jun-03, 04:10 PM Reply #911 »
Gintara,

As safe as they come.

My fellow finish 6th i think s I was not far off the first four.

Fours
nemisis - i expect a similar finish for your one tomorrow with little between 4th and 6th

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-03, 04:35 PM Reply #912 »
Tommy Berry was headed there for a reason fours - same as it was his only ride at Wellington previously.

I had a small profit on it with my main play as Spanish Point @ $24 on BF (ran 8th).

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-04, 05:44 PM Reply #913 »
We missed the Elmore Cup today at Bendigo  :shy:


Elmore
is a small town in Victoria north-east of Bendigo on the Campaspe River. Elmore is close to the Whipstick State Park.

At the 2016 census, Elmore had a population of 776.[1]


In the 1840s a small settlement developed on the Campaspe River servicing pastoral runs. The Post Office opened on 1 January 1849 as Bertram's Inn. On 1 January 1850 it was renamed Campaspie (sic). In 1864 when the township was established the name became Runnymede and in around 1882 the name was changed again to Elmore.[2]


Local businesses include a branch of the Bendigo Bank,[4] caf, wine store, fish and chip shop, IGA supermarket, BP petrol station, the Shamrock Hotel, a two-storey old building slowly being restored to its original state, the Railway Hotel, the Victoria Hotel, the Elmore Bakery, the Elmore Pharmacy and a medical centre. A railway station is also located in Elmore.

In the first week of October one of Australia's oldest and largest field days is held at Elmore. In 2004 there were 45,000 visitors. The first field day was held at Elmore in 1964. There is now a permanent site with pavilions, conference rooms and catering facilities which are hired out.

In January 2007, the Elmore Events Centre was the location of the 2007 Australian Scout Jamboree, the 21st Australian Jamboree. Over 13,000 people attended from 22 different countries and all of the Australian states and territories. Elmore Events Centre will again host the 2022 Australian Scout Jamboree, the 26th Australian Jamboree.

The town has an Australian Rules football team playing in the Heathcote District Football League.

Golfers play at the course of the Elmore Golf Club on Hunter Road.[5]

Elmore is also noted for being the home of the famous Elmore Oil, a product invented by longtime Elmore resident, Ralph Linford. Elmore Oil is a natural oil used for the relief of arthritis pain and was invented by Ralph in 1998. Elmore Oil uses the well-known eucalyptus oil grown locally in the region.[

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-04, 09:05 PM Reply #914 »
Aberdeen (at Muswellbrook) tomorrow.


You have to love Wiki some times   :lol:


Aberdeen is a small town in the upper Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia, in Upper Hunter Shire. It is 12 kilometres north of Muswellbrook on the New England Highway.

History


In 1828 Thomas Potter McQueen was granted 10,000 acres, and named the small township after George Hamilton-Gordon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen. In 1837 Segenhoe Inn was built, which Potter McQueen named after Segenhoe Manor, in Bedfordshire, where he was born in 1791.[2] Aberdeen Post Office opened on 1 August 1856.[3]
Population

According to the 2016 census of Population, there were 1,894 people in Aberdeen.

Today

Aberdeen has its own pre-school, which was founded in 1977. The town contains two schools: the Aberdeen Public School, catering from kindergarten to Grade 6; and St. Joseph's High School, a Catholic co-educational high school catering for Grades 7 through to 12.

Aberdeen has two churches St Thomas's Catholic Church, and St Mark's Anglican Church. It once had a third church, St Paul's Uniting Church, which has now been turned into an art gallery called the Artemis Gallery.

St Joseph's Aberdeen High School is located next to St Thomas's Catholic Church.[4]

The town has a local rugby league team, the Aberdeen Tigers.

Aberdeen is on the Main North railway line, and is serviced by a daily XPLorer long-distance service in each direction between Sydney and Armidale, as well as two/three local services in each direction between Scone and Newcastle.

For travellers, there are two main areas for accommodation in the town: the Aberdeen Motel, which is on the southern edge of the town; and the Segenhoe Inn, which is situated towards the northern end of town. The Commercial Hotel is also available for budget accommodation.


Aberdeen is possibly best known for the former abattoirs in the town centre ( that and Katherine Knight), which operated for well over 100 years, before the most recent owners - an American company called Conagra - decided to close down their New South Wales abattoirs and concentrate on their Queensland operations. One factor in closing down what was once a very important abattoir for Conagra, was that the financial cost of upgrading the Aberdeen Abattoir was deemed too high, thus the abattoir - which was the largest single employer in Aberdeen - was closed in 1999. Hundreds of people were left without work, and despite promises from both the New South Wales and Federal governments to encourage new businesses to open up in the area, nothing of note eventuated.

Notable people
Katherine Knight (born October 24, 1955), murderer who killed her partner, skinned and cooked his body parts[5]

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2022-Jun-05, 04:48 AM Reply #915 »
Who writes this shit on Wikipedia:

Aberdeen is possibly best known for the former abattoirs in the town centre ( that and Katherine Knight)

Surely the  :censored:  Aberdeen is best known for it's beautiful studs - you only have to drive the back roads between Scone and Aberdeen to quickly realize this.

Aberdeen Cup #5 Not Negotiating


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2022-Jun-05, 05:22 AM Reply #916 »
Pretty lean results since our last update

Date Race Tipper Selection Profit/Loss
02/05/22 Somerton Cup Brian Mc #3 Hurn Court -$10.00
02/05/22 Somerton Cup fours #15 Ben Shoof -$10.00
06/05/22 Wagga Cup Brian Mc #8 Five Kingdom -$10.00
13/05/22 Scone Cup Brian Mc #2 Our Playboy -$10.00
13/05/22 Scone Cup westie #6 Art Cadeau -$10.00
13/05/22 Scone Cup wily ole dog #1 Berdibek -$10.00
13/05/22 Scone Cup fours #7 Herzegovina -$10.00
15/05/22 Casterton Cup Gintara #4 Lorente -$10.00
15/05/22 Casterton Cup fours #8 Prospectus -$10.00
29/05/22 Millicent Cup wily ole dog #4 Brigadier -$10.00
29/05/22 Gunnedah Cup PoisonPen7 #6 Aesop's Fable -$10.00
29/05/22 Gunnedah Cup Gintara #1 Two Big Fari -$10.00
03/06/22 Wellington Cup Gintara #4 Sibaaq $9.00
03/06/22 Wellington Cup fours #9 Rule The World -$10.00


Update - Gintara 6 lengths in front   :biggrin:

Tipper Profit (Loss) Tips
Gintara $165.50 28
PoisonPen7 $75.00 15
Jeunes -$4.00 3
wily ole dog -$7.00 23
ratsack -$30.00 3
JwesleyHarding -$43.00 15
fours -$110.00 11
westie -$134.50 15
Brian Mc -$137.00 20

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-05, 12:20 PM Reply #917 »
Aberdeen Cup #3 Acrophobic

That's what I was referring to PP, you've got to wonder how long that has been up there.

Offline fours

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« 2022-Jun-05, 04:21 PM Reply #918 »
Aberdeen Cup       R7:5 Not Negotiating


Fours

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-10, 11:58 AM Reply #919 »
The Wingham Cup is race 6 on the card today at Taree.


Wingham
is a town in the Mid North Coast region of New South Wales, Australia in the Mid-Coast Council area 335 kilometres (208 mi) north of Sydney. According to the 2011 census, Wingham had a population of 5,313.[1]

History

The first land grant in the area was made at The Bight to George Rowley in 1841. Wingham was chosen as a location for a government settlement because supply boats could not proceed any further up the Manning River and was also located on the road from Raymond Terrace to Port Macquarie. Named after Wingham in Kent, England, Wingham was proclaimed a village in 1844 but allotments were not made until 1854, the same year that Henry Flett laid out Taree as a private settlement. In the meantime, Tinonee had also been established as a government settlement and in 1866 had a population of 100, compared to 90 at Wingham and 150 at Taree.[2][3][4]

Wingham was proclaimed a municipality in 1889. By 1909, Wingham consisted of 285 houses and had a population of 900, but government services had been transferred to Taree, which had a population of 1300 in 269 houses. The municipalities were merged with each other and the Manning Valley Shire in 1981 to form the City of Greater Taree.[5]

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-10, 12:01 PM Reply #920 »
Wingham #6 Alastor

Probably a bit sentimental here as I used to have a share in the boy before the syndicate voted to sell - one of the down sides that can happen with syndicates and small % shares.

He'll jump and run off the inside, the tight track will suit and he'll lead for a long way.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2022-Jun-10, 01:28 PM Reply #921 »
Wingham Cup @Taree R5 #5 Acoustix

Did the syndicate sell when he went to John Cooper from Kris Lees Gin?

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-10, 02:28 PM Reply #922 »
PP - he was an Australian Bloodstock syndication and they recommended to sell. Every owner got a vote as per their % so around 70% voted to sell.

Made about $19k through the Inglis online sale.

Whilst he wasn't challenging for an Everest slot imho he still had upside, he's a bit 1 paced so needed to be ridden on pace / lead and wind up / take off from the 600, the blinkers still needed to go on too.

He's already won back his purchase price.


Offline fours

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« 2022-Jun-10, 03:37 PM Reply #923 »
Wingham Cup R6:7    Mister Smartee

Fours

Online Gintara

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« 2022-Jun-11, 10:23 PM Reply #924 »
Tomorrow sees the Apsley Cup (run at Casterton) along with the Swan Hill Cup

Apsley is a small town in Victoria, Australia. It is on the Wimmera Highway, in the Shire of West Wimmera, 420 kilometres north-west of Melbourne, and 7 kilometres east of the South Australian border. The town is named after Apsley House in London. It was surveyed in 1851 and proclaimed in 1852, a Post Office opening on 1 January 1854[2] replacing that of Lake Wallace (open since 1 March 1849) nearer what is now Edenhope serving the grazing population.

The population at the 2016 census was 277. The town is close to Lake Bringalbert and Newlands Lake, and the Saint Gregory's Vineyard, which specialises in port wine.

Apsley had a football club that competed in the Kowree Naracoorte Football League from 1937. Later this would become the Kowree Naracoorte Tatiara Football League where Apsley competed until 1998, when they merged with Edenhope. Since 2007 Edenhope Apsley have played in the Horsham & District Football League. Apsley's best known footballers were Reg Burgess, who played for the Essendon Football Club, Murrie Batt, who played for the Collingwood Football Club and 2020 Brownlow Medalist Lachie Neale, who currently plays for the Brisbane Lions Football Club

A large Red-flowering Gum on Wallace Street is listed on the National Trust of Australia's Significant Tree Register for Victoria.

Golfers play at the Apsley Golf Club on the Wimmera Highway.[3]

In 2014, 12 farm families banded together to buy the pub. The Border Inn Hotel has completed an extensive renovation, and has a small attached general store for the town, which has recently opened.
 





Swan Hill

Swan Hill is a city in the northwest of Victoria, Australia on the Murray Valley Highway and on the south bank of the Murray River, downstream from the junction of the Loddon River. At June 2018, Swan Hill had a population of 11,103.[1]
« Last Edit: 2022-Jun-11, 10:34 PM by Gintara »


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