hidden - Greyhounds - Racehorse TALK harm-plan harm-plan

Racehorse TALK



hidden - Greyhounds - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: hidden  (Read 264979 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 26226
« 2015-Feb-17, 11:22 AM Reply #50 »
I heard the bloke from Victorian Greyhounds say they inspected over 3000 properties last year.
I suspect gaining evidence is very hard and it goes into the too hard basket

Offline tontonan

  • Group 2
  • User 106
  • Posts: 3463
« 2015-Feb-17, 12:09 PM Reply #51 »
Queensland wrap-up:

Prominent greyhound breeder and trainer and president of the United Queensland Greyhound Association Deborah Arnold allowed her 70 greyhound puppies and racing dogs at her property 'Dessa Downes' in Churchable to be filmed by Four Corners. “The kennels have to be RSPCA QLD-approved,” said Arnold. “It definitely meets the requirements.” When questioned on the practice of live-baiting, Arnold denied any knowledge of it: “If they do I don’t know about it, and I don’t really want to know about it.”

Undercover footage from Animal Liberation Queensland and Animals Australia earlier filmed a training track in Churchable, Queensland, across the road from Arnold’s property. On film, it captures Arnold and her dog Dorak Des chasing a live pig on the lure while Arnold asks “what’s the quickest been today” before being informed her dog is. Arnold is later asked by Four Corners what mantra is at the forefront of greyhound racing in 2015, to which she states, “animal welfare.”

Professor of animal behaviour and animal welfare science Paul McGreavy offered his comments on the matter of live-baiting coming from a decade of research into the breed, insisting there are breeds far more dangerous and that greyhounds are simply “chasing to catch, not to kill”. He emphasises the dogs “love racing, they love moving around that speed - they’ll be getting off on this,” and that they “are so sedentary when they’re not exposed to this stimuli.”

Animal Liberation Queensland investigator Hailey Cotton reveals the first tip-off regarding live-baiting in Churchable was passed to her: “Their words to me were ‘something really bad is going on there,’ and they said ‘it smells like death’”.

Undercover cameras were placed in the property of prominent Queensland trainer Tom Noble, a celebrated, award-winning greyhound trainer with almost 50 years in the game. His break-in centre is the epicenter of greyhound training in Queensland, and the live baiting footage of Deborah Arnold’s dog occurred on his track.

More than 40 owners, trainers and handlers are recorded on camera while live baiting occurs on Tom Noble’s property. “These people are leading trainers, they’re training their dogs with these methods,” said Cotton. “They’re then going on to win races using these methods, so the whole integrity of greyhound racing is really brought into question here.”

Footage confirms four times a week, piglets and later possums are flung around Noble’s track 26 times at high speed. The piglet is shown squealing with a man on the camera swearing at it, and one or two dogs are let loose to chase, grab and maul the possum while it’s still alive. Some 56 minutes later, the lure stops and the possum is snapped in half, the corpse still attached by its spinal cord, with the men in the footage making light of the situation.

Discussion of dumping dead dogs is captured on film, leading the investigation to ask NSW greyhound trainer John Thompson about the issue. Animal Liberation Australia links him as the man in the footage telling others to smash a baby possum’s head in so the live baiting of its mother can begin. “They ripped the baby from the mother, they tied the mother on the lure, and they then stick the baby’s head in the sand to kill it while its mother is watching on, all the time laughing and joking on how amusing it is,” said Hailey Cotton.

Victoria wrap-up:

In mid-November 2014, Lyn White of Animals Australia simultaneously led an investigation at the Tooradin Trial Track in Victoria after a tip-off. Considered to be in the heart of greyhound racing territory in the state, the track is run by owner operator Stuart Mills, whose brother is Andrew Mills, former deputy chief steward for Greyhound Racing Victoria and now the regulator’s chief racing grader for the entire state.

Lyn White reveals 17 people were captured live baiting the first time undercover footage was recorded. The first trainer identified is former steward of Greyhound Racing Victoria Paul Anderton, who arrives as Stuart Mills attaches a lure on a wooden plank with leather straps, before returning with a live rabbit and stretching it out tightly as he buckles it down flat. The rabbit is shown returning five minutes later, mauled but still alive and twitching in agony. “It tells me this is a practice that has been going for an acceptable level to trainers for years and years,” White said.

Anderton’s dogs went on to win three races days after being captured on the footage in Tooradin. President of Cranbourne Racing Club Neville King is also filmed on camera live baiting two days before Christmas at Tooradin.

Trainer Dennis Dean and a young girl watch as live rabbits are leashed and thrown to the dogs to kill. CEO of Greyhound Australasia Scott Parker was questioned on his thoughts of live-baiting behaviour during the revelations of the footage and the discovery of children being brought to watch while it occurs: “I think that’s ridiculous and abhorrent. I don’t support that at all. I’m not aware of it, and never heard of it, live baiting is illegal as well as being wrong and against the rules of greyhound racing.”

Footage of dogs on the Tooradin track is shown, encouraged to savagely kill several rabbits, which are skinned or tied as they maul them.

Former steward at Greyhound Racing Victoria Amanda Hill says there was a problem inside GRV regarding regulators failing to pick up and follow on rumours of live-baiting in the state: “Lack of resources, lack of funds, lack of knowledge, or plainly, they don’t want to accept that it’s a possibility.” She believes some trainers are “doing it to try and get an edge. It’s probably harder to get caught live baiting than what it is to using performance-enhancing drugs.”

Hill left GRV in 2004 and became the Chair of Stewards in Greyhound Racing Tasmania, where she was able to do better in stopping live baiting. In 2008, Hill caught a female trainer red-handed live baiting a possum. Possum carcasses were found all over the track, and it remains one of two cases in the past decade where a steward has followed through and successfully convicted a live baiter.
Hill identifies two-time Australian greyhound trainer of the year Darren McDonald as one of the figures caught on film three days before the 2014 Melbourne Cup, engaging in live baiting at Tooradin alongside handler Chris Connelly. He is shown on camera carrying a sack with a tiny pink piglet before placing it on the lure. The two men remove the muzzles on their dogs after two laps and the dogs maul the piglet, heard squealing as it dies off-camera. McDonald has since transferred all of his greyhounds to his wife’s name.


New South Wales wrap-up:

McDonald’s top sprinter Keybow is revealed by Four Corners to have been broken in across the border in NSW at Londonderry by Zeke Kadir.

Four Corners received a tip-off within the industry that Kadir was rumoured to be the best live baiter within the state, and that it occurred at his property as part of his training purposes. “He mentioned that he broke (in) Keybow, and he talked about how he gets live rabbits from a person he knows, and he gets about 30 a week,” a private investigator for Four Corners confirms.
Footage shows Zeke Kadir using the rabits tied to a hand-pushed lure, controlled by Kadir. They’re dragged along the ground at speed pursued by dogs in training. On January 12, 2015, the footage captures Ian Morgan arriving at the venue for a private session, where a native possum is strung to the lure struggling to escape as two muzzled greyhounds attempt to bite the possum. Four minutes later, the muzzles come off and the cry is captured off-screen of the possum’s demise. “I am fearful at how widespread this is, and the consequences for literally thousands of animals each year,” said Lyn White.

Morgan is later seen removing the dead possum from his greyhound, Cee Cee Quoted. Four days later, Four Corners catches him leaving his Western Sydney home bound for an afternoon race meet in Newcastle, where Cee Cee Quoted places third. John Cauchi, of Box Hill, was also caught practising live baiting by hand.


Aftermath:

Four Corners notes requests for interviews with the regulators in all three states caught live-baiting were declined, deferring comment to CEO of Greyhounds Australasia Scott Parker. “I don’t suspect this is a systemic problem at all,” Parker said. “It’s illegal, abhorrent, and totally rejected by the industry."

When asked about how three tracks have been confirmed to have had live baiting occurring on site that have not been detected by regulators, Parker surmises “our controlling bodies do a great job, but it's a big industry and a lot of these facilities are a long, long way away from Sydney and Melbourne and Brisbane - and that’s why compliance officers are employed to get out there.”
In Queensland, RSPCA caught the live-baiters at Tom Noble’s establishment during their follow-up raids and saved a live piglet tied in a sack moments away from being bound and baited. Tom Noble was on-site, as well as his staff James Draws and Tony McCabe. They denied any wrong-doing despite being caught on film. RSPCA eventually found a second piglet hidden inside a shed on the property, wounded from a previous live-baiting session.

At Tooradin, Stuart Mills was watched closely, but no animals were caught on-site. Four Corners visited him the next day of the raids, and he’s clearly shaken as he maintains his denials about live-baiting.

Zeke Kadir’s property was visited, but he refused to answer Four Corners' reporters on live baiting.

Four Corners' investigations are now a criminal matter, with state charges imminent.


Post program:

In Victoria, GRV chair Peter Caillard has welcomed a $6 million government investment for investigative resources for GRV to help detect and prevent practises such as live-baiting from occurring in the future. In addition, GRV have also announced that dead animals will no longer be allowed to assist in the training of greyhounds. “The use of live animals is already outlawed. GRV will also outlaw the use of dead animals in greyhound training whether on private premises or registered training premises,” Mr Caillard said in a press release. Caillard has also agreed to cancel the Greyhound Industry Awards night, which was to be held this Friday night, after instruction from MP Martin Pakula. The Darren McDonald-trained Sweet It Is was the frontrunner to take out the highest honour, 2014 Victorian Greyhound of the Year.

In New South Wales, GRNSW have announced that a taskforce has been established to investigate the extent of the live-baiting practices in the state. The taskforce will be led by former High Court justice and eminent legal practitioner, the Hon. Michael McHugh AC, QC. The taskforce will look into the training methods used in NSW and will arrange for trial tracks and training facilities to be monitored. It is also set to examine whether GRNSW and relevant agencies such as the RSPCA NSW have the necessary powers to correctly investigate animal cruelty allegations. “We need to stamp out live baiting once and for all. Not only is it illegal but it is sickening and we are disgusted with what we have witnessed on air," GRNSW CEO Brent Hogan said in a press release. “GRNSW welcomes Michael McHugh’s acceptance to head this taskforce and is committed to working closely with him and the taskforce as quickly as we can. The taskforce will help ensure that live baiting and other acts of animal cruelty identified in NSW are eradicated as quickly as possible.”


Read mo Live baiting - Four Corners probe leaves industry in turmoil http://www.australianracinggreyhound.com/australian-greyhound-racing/abc-live-baiting-investigation-draws-blood/61358#ixzz3RxnwUvci


ABC  Iview 

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/four-corners/

The program will also be replayed 12.00 -12.45am Thursday on the ABC1  and 8.01-8.46pm on Saturday on ABC News24

Online jfc

  • Group 1
  • User 723
  • Posts: 6933
« 2015-Feb-17, 12:42 PM Reply #52 »
I consider this an excellent expose in stark contrast to the insufferable rubbish ABC often foists upon us.

No shortage of irony in that it was hosted by Kerry O'Brien. No stranger to the racetrack, but memorable for his fawning acceptance of Waterhouse tripe not that long back.

The dog industry like many is clearly corrupt, and that corruption is clearly managed from the top.

And it can clearly be fixed overnight.

The training establishments exposed here need to be immediately shut down.

And surveillance cameras need to be installed at every training site. Remotely controlled by Stewards.

It's a small cost to stop a lot dead in their tracks.

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 8521
« 2015-Feb-17, 12:52 PM Reply #53 »
The problem lies with a lot of these dog trainers live on properties in the sticks or places where there is no one around, they can do as they please on these properties and no one can stop them.How are stewards and racing officials supposed to stop anyone living and training in the middle of nowhere doing whatever ever they want ?

Online fours

  • Group 1
  • User 704
  • Posts: 5994
« 2015-Feb-17, 12:56 PM Reply #54 »
Bubba,

Drones are very usefull.

fours

Online jfc

  • Group 1
  • User 723
  • Posts: 6933
« 2015-Feb-17, 12:59 PM Reply #55 »
Perhaps I'm deluded, but I believe these days there is no middle of nowhere.

Even in the most desolate places there are many satellites hovering in the vicinity making full time surveillance practical and affordable.

This seems a far more cost effective result than having humans driving 100s of kilometers. Only to find that their attempted punch has been telegraphed.


Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 8521
« 2015-Feb-17, 01:03 PM Reply #56 »
Yes, my house is on google earth and you can even see a lounge chair in the back yard, but I doubt a drone could pick up if I had a piglet in a sack to give to a greyhound. 

Online jfc

  • Group 1
  • User 723
  • Posts: 6933
« 2015-Feb-17, 01:14 PM Reply #57 »
Yes, my house is on google earth and you can even see a lounge chair in the back yardt two at the , but I doubt a drone could pick up if I had a piglet in a sack to give to a greyhound. 
But a surveillance camera or two at the training site would.

And this can be controlled by satellite, just as I guess drones can.

I get off on the technology angle of Homeland, 24, NCIS whatever because that's all credible and available.

And should be employed to handle these medieval (or Islamic terrorist) practices.

Offline D-G

  • Group 2
  • User 425
  • Posts: 4615
« 2015-Feb-17, 01:40 PM Reply #58 »
But a surveillance camera or two at the training site would.

And this can be controlled by satellite, just as I guess drones can.



The problem is that training track would no longer be used for such things.
There would simply be an "underground" ie unlicensed facility opened and used.


Online jfc

  • Group 1
  • User 723
  • Posts: 6933
« 2015-Feb-17, 01:57 PM Reply #59 »
The problem is that training track would no longer be used for such things.
There would simply be an "underground" ie unlicensed facility opened and used.



I stand to be corrected, but to me it appears there's quite a bit of effort in setting up such establishments.

Our taxes are being wasted on surveillance equipment to check if so and so exceeded the speed limit over some section.

Who gives a cloaca!

Either you record and secure the movement of every registered dog, through GPS collars. Or survey every training joint. Preferably both.

There is a technology solution that will severely hamper the dastardly ambitions of these dog cheats.

So find out what that is, and use it!


Offline D-G

  • Group 2
  • User 425
  • Posts: 4615
« 2015-Feb-17, 02:07 PM Reply #60 »
I stand to be corrected, but to me it appears there's quite a bit of effort in setting up such establishments.


Either you record and secure the movement of every registered dog, through GPS collars. Or survey every training joint. Preferably both.

There is a technology solution that will severely hamper the dastardly ambitions of these dog cheats.

So find out what that is, and use it!



Ok, so Noble decides to sell his property to his mate, or wife.
His mate/wife has no interest in registering it as a greyhound training property, so the already established property is no longer registered and the governing bodies have no authority to install cameras.
The GPS option would have to be an implant as collars can be removed.
Even then, you can't stop someone taking their dog somewhere

I agree with your sentiments, jfc, but the criminals will always find a way around the rules.

Offline tontonan

  • Group 2
  • User 106
  • Posts: 3463
« 2015-Feb-17, 02:09 PM Reply #61 »

There are a lot of excuses for doing nothing.

However doing nothing is what has landed greyhound racing in this mess in the first place. 

The fact is that a handful of animal activists and a couple of Four Corners reporters have achieved more in a 45 minute television program than the greyhound officials have achieved in decades.

They achieved it by being pro-active.  Not sitting on Sal Perna's arse waiting for a whistleblower to come forward to tell them all about it but by actively investigating greyhound racing's dirty not-so secret.

It is cringe worthy that the government is going to throw millions of dollars at the very authorities who have failed to enforce there own rules especially when those they have failed to catch are so deeply entrenched in the industry - the President of the United Queensland Greyhound Association, the industry's leading trainers, the brother of the former deputy chief steward, the President of the Cranbourne Racing Club,etc.

Would it be better to throw that money at someone with actual legal powers to bring criminal charges such as the RSPCA, which at least has some claims to independence from the culture they need to police ? 

Or make a donation to the Animal rights groups ?  They seem to be doing a better job at policing than industry has proven capable of !

Offline bronx

  • Group3
  • User 1160
  • Posts: 814
« 2015-Feb-17, 02:22 PM Reply #62 »
I stand to be corrected, but to me it appears there's quite a bit of effort in setting up such establishments.

Our taxes are being wasted on surveillance equipment to check if so and so exceeded the speed limit over some section.

Who gives a cloaca!

Either you record and secure the movement of every registered dog, through GPS collars. Or survey every training joint. Preferably both.

There is a technology solution that will severely hamper the dastardly ambitions of these dog cheats.

So find out what that is, and use it!



Some are really going over the top with this now.


Lets put tracking anklets on all greyhound trainers like convicted pedophiles.

Lets strap a go-pro to the bridle of every horse so that we can see 24/7 whats going on with the horse.

Lets put surveillance cameras in every stable in every establishment to watch them needling or drenching horses.

While we are at it lets put cameras in every home to see that noone is having a bong or shooting up
or in bedrooms having sex with the same sex or even an animal.

Every back yard garage or lawnmower shed needs to have a camera with surveillance 24/7 so noone can create a meth lab.


Is every aussie that goes to Bali a drug trafficker???
Just because a couple have been caught how many thousands do nothing wrong?


You can go thru a lot of sports with its problems....Lance Armstrong, World Cup Soccer, cricket match fixing. It is everywhere.
Corruption is in everything.


Even if it is now after the fact I am sure the Controlling bodies will now get the picture that they currently arent doing enough & rectify.
Some heads should roll along with the heads of the people involved & caught out.






Online jfc

  • Group 1
  • User 723
  • Posts: 6933
« 2015-Feb-17, 02:45 PM Reply #63 »
Our politicians are reassuring us that they'll catch us exceeding the speed limit through facial? recognition of our number plates.

What a waste of resources for no good purpose! I speed at every opportunity to distance myself from wowser drivers.

Surveillance cameras and collars, anklets whatever are extremely low cost.

They'll make the job that much harder for the perps in this caper.

Just because convicted pedophiles wear a surveillance device (I wish!) is no justification for assuming anyone wearing a surveillance device is a pedophile.





Offline manikato1

  • Group 2
  • User 195
  • Posts: 4144
« 2015-Feb-17, 02:48 PM Reply #64 »
There are a lot of excuses for doing nothing.

However doing nothing is what has landed greyhound racing in this mess in the first place. 

The fact is that a handful of animal activists and a couple of Four Corners reporters have achieved more in a 45 minute television program than the greyhound officials have achieved in decades.

They achieved it by being pro-active.  Not sitting on Sal Perna's arse waiting for a whistleblower to come forward to tell them all about it but by actively investigating greyhound racing's dirty not-so secret.

It is cringe worthy that the government is going to throw millions of dollars at the very authorities who have failed to enforce there own rules especially when those they have failed to catch are so deeply entrenched in the industry - the President of the United Queensland Greyhound Association, the industry's leading trainers, the brother of the former deputy chief steward, the President of the Cranbourne Racing Club,etc.

Would it be better to throw that money at someone with actual legal powers to bring criminal charges such as the RSPCA, which at least has some claims to independence from the culture they need to police ? 

Or make a donation to the Animal rights groups ?  They seem to be doing a better job at policing than industry has proven capable of !

Or at least separate the regulation from the promotion of the sport, so the regulators aren't beholden to the commercial aspects of the sport.

Offline worldisavampire

  • Group 2
  • User 545
  • Posts: 3986
« 2015-Feb-17, 03:50 PM Reply #65 »
I was sent this today from an old sports journo. Would love to know what you guys think-



I was shocked by a few other things on the show last night.

I honestly thought that every greyhound that races has had a live kill of a rabbit as part of their training. Last night gave me the impression that some dogs aren't given a live kill. That surprised me. Rabbits are a serious pest in this country. They are environmental vandals. I always envisaged that greyhounds were let loose on a property with rabbits on them and they were allowed to maul them to death.

Tying up the rabbits to a lure and allowing them to be slowly eaten was horrific obviously and hopefully this is one step to stopping it.

I remember talking to a guy I played football with a long time ago. He grew up in the country and took time to get used to city life. He would tell stories of life on his huge property in NSW. During the drought, one of his neighbours dogs got pregnant. They weren't able to afford to feed the 9 puppies that resulted so they were all put in a bag and put in the incinerator. I was outraged and I still get sick thinking about it. But it was explained to me that country folk deal with completely different issues to those from the city.

I won't see an animal get killed for 10, 20, 30 years- maybe even ever. They see dozens of animals killed every single day. When we want chicken for dinner, we go to Coles. When they want chicken for dinner, one of the teenage sons goes outside and cuts the head off a live chicken. A few hours later the family eats.

So when they see a rabbit that has destroyed their land or a feral pig being eaten by a greyhound, it doesn't even register with them like it did with all of us. Think of the little girl last night that was there to see the live baiting. She would have seen animals getting killed every day of her life. She hates rabbits because they are costing her family food and money.

Rabbits get caught in traps and take hours to die sometimes. A bullet lasts 1 second. Poison takes from 2 to 30 minutes. And live baiting usually takes 2 minutes.

I just hope an entire industry isn't brought down over the final 120 seconds of a feral pig or environmental vandal rabbit's life.

Offline worldisavampire

  • Group 2
  • User 545
  • Posts: 3986
« 2015-Feb-17, 04:43 PM Reply #66 »
This just gets more and more interesting to me

It is estimated there are 200 million rabbits wrecking Australia.

In 1859 some moronic Englishman brought 24 rabbits over so he could hunt them for sport. By the 1920's those 24 had grown to 10 billion.

Since the 1950's Australia has tried biological methods to eradicate this pest. But the fight is being lost now because the rabbits build up natural immunity. God bless Charles Darwin.

All those rabbits that we saw yesterday will be killed. Slaughtered. Usually they will be poisoned which takes a long time and would be extremely painful. So does this even up the argument that the few thousand that are used as greyhound bait actually suffer less and end up exactly how we want them. Dead?

Offline worldisavampire

  • Group 2
  • User 545
  • Posts: 3986
« 2015-Feb-17, 04:52 PM Reply #67 »
More... sorry this is a live email chain and I'm finding it very intriguing as my opinion begins to get confused and possibly shifts.

If Greyhounds had blood lust for cockroaches or cane toads and to be trained they chased a bunch of cockroaches until they caught and ate them, would there be an uproar?

Well to the country folk of Australia, rabbits and feral pigs are 8,000,000 times worse than cockroaches. So maybe they should be excused if their heart doesn't bleed when some hideous rabbit gets killed. Remember that the next time you pull out the poison to kill that cockroach in your kitchen.

Offline arakaan

  • Group 1
  • User 192
  • Posts: 10699
« 2015-Feb-17, 04:55 PM Reply #68 »
What about the possums that the pricks in qld took such glee in killing(one also shown killed in NSW). You know the protected species.  :whistle:

P.S I have hunted and killed rabbits on my uncle farms as a teenager. Have shot plenty of them. Last night's viewing was disgusting.

Offline worldisavampire

  • Group 2
  • User 545
  • Posts: 3986
« 2015-Feb-17, 05:09 PM Reply #69 »
Agreed. The possums being killed should mean those who did it get prosecuted. But talk of jail time for those killing rabbits when we are poisoning them at the same time is a moral dilemma.

Some of the latest poison being used, is weaker because of other environmental issues. So it sometimes takes a week for a rabbit to die. One week of having your insides rot.

Offline koolcat

  • Group 1
  • User 26
  • Posts: 5123
« 2015-Feb-17, 06:00 PM Reply #70 »
I was sick at last nights Four Corners the stinking bludgers being so cruel to every animal rabbit,possum and a tiny piglet who was so small what about the cats that have been known for years to be used to blood greyhounds you can't tell me that stewards haven't known about this being done is a falicy I heard about a training track outside Queanbeyan blooding greyhounds back in the 70s when we took a racehorse down to Canberra and parked our Caravan at the Park there and cats were disappearing like clockwork every week inc mine a guy living at the park spoke about the trial track being used to blood dogs with cats,the people running this had lookouts up trees so they could see any cars coming as well as locked gates.

Offline tontonan

  • Group 2
  • User 106
  • Posts: 3463
« 2015-Feb-17, 06:31 PM Reply #71 »
But it not a question of animals dying.  It is a question of the cruelty inflicted.  It is the Prevention of CRUELTY to Animals Act we are talking about.

It is not about the 'rights' of animals at all.  Ultimately the Act is about the responsibilities of people not the rights of animals. 

It is unacceptable in our society to torture animals.  Strapping an animal down, dragging it around a track while it is ravaged by your dog is cruelty and totally unacceptable in our society. The fact that the animal dies is a natural mercy that spoils your sport.

The crime is not that you have killed the animal.  The crime is that you have tortured it.

Offline D-G

  • Group 2
  • User 425
  • Posts: 4615
« 2015-Feb-17, 06:32 PM Reply #72 »
Being the flawed human hypocrite that I am, I eagerly await my roast piggy to finish cooking tonight.

I have no doubt that watching Darren Mcdonald with the little piggy had at least a small part in my choice of dinner tonight  :chin:

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 26226
« 2015-Feb-17, 06:46 PM Reply #73 »
But it not a question of animals dying.  It is a question of the cruelty inflicted. 





 :clap2:

Offline Jeunes

  • VIP Club
  • Group 2
  • User 296
  • Posts: 2866
« 2015-Feb-17, 06:54 PM Reply #74 »
As most people know, Four Corners had a story on live baiting.

It will be interesting to see what happens as a result with some trainers being suspended. Story below.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-17/leading-greyhound-figure-bob-smith-live-baiting-controversy/6131244

Greyhound racing: Former top official Bob Smith identified in live baiting footage aired by Four Corners

By Caro Meldrum-Hanna, staff

Updated 24 minutes agoTue 17 Feb 2015, 7:26pm

Greyhound Racing Victoria's (GRV) former integrity and racing operations manager has been identified as one of the men seen training dogs at sessions using animals as live bait, in footage aired by Four Corners last night.

Bob Smith, the state's former second in charge of greyhound racing, can be seen in the footage taken at the Tooradin trial track south-east of Melbourne.

Smith has been serving on a GRV steering committee and his involvement casts serious doubt over the regulator's claims of integrity.

A Four Corners report on Monday night aired footage showing live piglets, possums and rabbits being fixed to mechanical lures before being chased and mauled to death by dogs during training sessions in Victoria, Queensland and New South Wales.

Live baiting has been banned and criminalised for decades, but trainers and owners across the country have been using the illegal training method in the belief that it will improve a dog's performance.

Another former GRV staffer, steward Paul Anderton, was identified by Four Corners as a member of Tooradin's secret live-baiting ring.

The state's racing integrity commissioner, Sal Perna, acknowledged the problem could be bigger than first thought.

"My guess is that it is isolated, but I really don't know yet," he said.

The Victorian Government announced two separate investigations into the industry following the Four Corners story.

The state's chief veterinary officer was appointed to undertake a broad investigation, while Mr Perna was to conduct an independent probe.

Mr Perna also called for urgent reform to racing rules to stop trainers getting around sanctions by transferring ownership of their dogs to relatives.

"If it doesn't have any effect because they can move a dog over to someone else and continue to be doing what they did," he said.

"They're not working and they need to be addressed."

The RSPCA, in conjunction with police in NSW, Victoria and Queensland raided five properties on Wednesday last week.

The raids came after Four Corners, in conjunction with Animals Australia and Animal Liberation Queensland, confidentially handed over the results of its seperate investigations to the state-based RSPCAs more than a fortnight ago.

Accusations authorities failed to act on complaints

In Queensland, the number of suspended trainers is up to 13. Live baiting ring leader Tom Noble is believed to be one of them.

"I'll be put out for life. I know that. I've got nothing to lose," Mr Noble said.

But the ABC has obtained information that Racing Queensland has failed to act on multiple reports about conditions at Mr Noble's track.

Photographs obtained by the ABC show a greyhound found languishing paralysed on Mr Noble's property in 2012, and the regulator also received at least one complaint about him in 2010.

New Queensland Racing Minister Bill Byrne said he believed it was a matter for an inquiry process to reveal what level of regulatory oversight was absent.

"What's needed is a clear understanding of how such things could possibly happen given the regulatory framework that we have," he said.

Greyhound Racing New South Wales has also announced a taskforce to investigate the extent of live baiting.

While calls grow for independent inquiries into the three state regulators, federal MP Andrew Wilkie said that was not enough.

"What needs to be done now is for all greyhound racing right throughout this country to be immediately suspended," he said.

"No more races until this matter is fully investigated and until safeguards are put in place to stop this animal cruelty."

Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce has hit out at the animal rights activists who have helped expose the evidence of live baiting, questioning whether they had broken the law to obtain the footage.

Mr Joyce said he was opposed to cruelty to animals, but said activists should not be trespassing onto private properties to secretly record vision.

"You cannot decide to take the law into your own hands," he said.

"Once you do that, once you make that exclusion, that apparently you can break the law for this person, then where does it stop?"


BACK TO ALL TOPICS
Sitemap