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Jack Hobbs ( Sorry Golden Horn )- The new Frankel - International Racing - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Jack Hobbs ( Sorry Golden Horn )- The new Frankel  (Read 22811 times)

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Offline firezuki

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« 2015-May-14, 03:40 AM Reply #25 »
That would be Frankel, then.  He did nothing else. 

Offline The Jackal

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« 2015-May-14, 02:13 PM Reply #26 »
That would be Frankel, then.  He did nothing else. 


9 of Frankel's 10 Group 1 wins were in successive races, which is a record in itself.
Cirrus Des Aigles pushed him to a 1 3/4 lengths in a race with no pace over an unsuitable trip.

He's been runner up to Gentildonna at Group 1 level and Goldikova ( 14 Group 1 wins)  over an unsuitable trip.

They're probably hasn't been a horse that has competed against better horses consistently than Cirrus Des Aigles.
















Offline The Jackal

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« 2015-May-14, 02:25 PM Reply #27 »
To put 9 successive Group 1 wins in perspective.

Bernborough won 7 in succession.

Black Caviar won 8  but 2 of them were at Morphetville FFS.     :lol:   :lol:   :lol:

Offline worldisavampire

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« 2015-May-14, 04:23 PM Reply #28 »
Frankel is the best I've seen whichever way you dice it.

Offline sobig

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« 2015-May-14, 05:15 PM Reply #29 »
Frankel is the best I've seen whichever way you dice it.

  emthup

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« 2015-May-14, 05:50 PM Reply #30 »

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Editor's BlogPay Homage to Elm Park and get the 18-1 at the double

13 May 2015

Whether he was simply jesting, playing to the crowd or really believes it, John Gosden rammed home the point on Wednesday at York that to have Jack Hobbs as favourite for the Derby is just plain ‘silly’.

And in almost every way he is right.

Jack Hobbs is favourite for the Epsom showpiece purely because, in the market’s view, nothing has come out of the trials better than his taking success at Sandown in a handicap off a handicap mark of 85.

Winning at Esher by 12 lengths was certainly visually impressive, but it always left Jack Hobbs open to being overrated next time out and that appears to be the case on the Knavesmire.

He might not even be the best contender for Thursday’s Betfred Dante Stakes in his yard.

The son of Halling is 9-4 favourite to land the meeting's feature event, but last night was being pushed for the role of market leader by Golden Horn, also trained by Gosden.

On form, Golden Horn’s defeat of Peacock, who was rated 106, in the Fielden Stakes at Newmarket last month puts him on a similar level as the favourite.

But the most important aspect to this, is that neither horses' form stacks up to that of Elm Park’s.

Elm Park progressed through the ranks last season to win the Racing Post Trophy, which has been a strong feeder race for the Dante Stakes in recent times.

A lot of people have crabbed Elm Park’s form, but the horses he has beaten are a much stronger bunch than anything Jack Hobbs, or even Golden Horn, have faced.

The son of globetrotting Phoenix Reach appears to go on any ground, and is versatile in terms of tactics - in the Royal Lodge he stumbled on exiting the gates but came home strongly. In the Stonehenge Stakes in August and at Doncaster he was up with the pace, if not forcing it.

His achievements far outweigh anything in the field and he really should be favourite.

With the market searching for a strong contender, the winner of the Dante Stakes will almost certainly head the betting at Epsom so the 18-1 available that Elm Park wins the Dante and the Derby with Skybet looks a good piece of business.

I also would not put anybody off trading Hans Holbein, the Chester Vase winner. Once the dust settles after the Dante, he is likely to be significantly shorter than the 20-1 he is currently available at.



« Last Edit: 2015-May-14, 05:52 PM by Authorized »

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-May-15, 12:23 AM Reply #31 »
Perhaps Golden Horn deserves the big wrap. That was impressive.

Both are good horses as seen by the fact the 3rd horse is a group 1 winner.

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-May-15, 12:34 AM Reply #32 »

Gosden on GOLDEN HORN: "He's a well balanced horse and he's neat, whereas Jack Hobbs is a big rangy boy and a different type"


Online wily ole dog

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« 2015-May-15, 07:37 AM Reply #33 »
Perhaps Golden Horn deserves the big wrap. That was impressive.

Both are good horses as seen by the fact the 3rd horse is a group 1 winner.


What sort of G1 winner was it?

G1 SA Oaks or AJC Oaks?

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-May-15, 07:41 AM Reply #34 »
The Racing Post Trophy. All 3 are quality horses.

Offline j.r.b.

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« 2015-May-15, 08:38 AM Reply #35 »
The Racing Post Trophy. All 3 are quality horses.

Agree.

O'Brien's runners were appalling.

Offline Hareeba

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« 2015-May-15, 10:08 AM Reply #36 »
That would be Frankel, then.  He did nothing else. 

Frankel won weak races in a weak era. Black Cav won twice as many btw lol

Offline Hareeba

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« 2015-May-15, 10:09 AM Reply #37 »
Times fail
Major races fail
Strong opposition fail

Frankel fails all 3 champion tests lol

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-May-16, 01:27 AM Reply #38 »

Offline worldisavampire

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« 2015-Jun-07, 01:30 AM Reply #39 »
Big moment for this bloke. I backed him at 6.50.


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jun-07, 01:47 AM Reply #40 »
Seems the stablemate has stolen his thunder and is the new Sea The Stars.  :nowink: :no: :yes: :embarrassed:

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jun-28, 03:43 AM Reply #41 »
Won the Irish Derby in nice fashion.

Good horse.


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jun-28, 10:53 AM Reply #42 »
360-derby-ire

Jack Hobbs powers clear to record a brilliant win

 PICTU RP GRAPHICS

Hobbs hits rivals for 
six in Irish Derby stroll

Report: Curragh, Saturday

Dubai Duty Free Irish Derby (Group 1) 1m4f, 3yo

JACK HOBBS, no match for his stablemate Golden Horn in the Derby, became the first British-trained winner of the Irish Derby since 1993 when he justified favouritism in the 150th running of the Curragh Classic on Saturday.  

Sent off a 10-11 chance, Jack Hobbs oozed class under William Buick on his way to victory in Ireland's richest race as he confirmed Epsom superiority over Storm The Stars and Giovanni Canaletto, who made the frame behind Golden Horn in the Derby.

The son of Halling's success provided Newmarket-based John Gosden with his maiden win in the Irish Derby and makes him the first British trainer since Henry Cecil saddled Commander In Chief in 1993 to land the €1.25 million Classic, which has been dominated in recent years by Aidan O'Brien.

However, his four-strong squad for the Dubai Duty Free-backed contest, which included Oaks heroine Qualify, had no answer to the impressive winner, who was cut to 8-1 (from 12) by Betfred and Paddy Power for the Qatar Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.

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"He was fantastic and is a great horse," said Buick, adding to his Classic triumphs in the St Leger on Arctic Cosmos and Masked Marvel.

"I had a lot of belief in him before Epsom and he was even better today. He's improving all the time and it's fantastic to win an Irish Derby - it's also great to ride horses like him.

"He's been handled brilliantly by John. He's a late-maturing horse, but has improved with every run. He's a serious horse."

Jack Hobbs used to run in the colours of Gosden's wife Rachel Hood, but now carries the famous royal blue Godolphin silks of Buick's employer Sheikh Mohammed.

"It's brilliant for Sheikh Mohammed and the whole team," added Buick, who won racing's richest prize in March when Prince Bishop struck in the $10m Dubai World Cup.

"Everyone works so hard behind the scenes so to get days like this is brilliant and to get an Irish Derby on my CV is even better."

Storm The Stars, trained by William Haggas, was sent into the lead by Pat Cosgrave and was tracked by Buick on Jack Hobbs, although he briefly looked tight for room turning in when Joseph O'Brien got after Giovanni Canaletto.

The cool Buick showed no signs of panic though and Jack Hobbs shot clear to record a five-length victory.

"Pat was always going to ride his own race in front, but I always wanted him to be my target," said Buick. "It went pretty smooth in the end."

Gosden, who is set to saddle red-hot favourite Golden Horn in next Saturday's Coral-Eclipse, said of Jack Hobbs: "We'll put him away for the Prix Niel at Longchamp and go for the Arc after.

"He'll be better at four because he's quite light framed and needs to fill out. I loved the way he finished his race out - it's solid Epsom form and William waited with him, which was the right thing."

O'Brien, who was chasing his 12th Irish Derby victory, may have to work some magic to find a middle-distance colt to trouble Gosden's brilliant pair, although he has top miler Gleneagles under his care at Ballydoyle.

His runners filled places three to six with Kilimanjaro, Highland Reel and Qualify chasing home Giovanni Canaletto.


Steve M

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« 2015-Jun-28, 01:58 PM Reply #43 »


Replay

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jul-08, 02:56 PM Reply #44 »
Frankel - ascot - 20/10/2012

Frankel: took six runs to reach mark of 130

 PICTU Mark Cranham (racingpost.com/photos)

Frankel

Dewhurst
The final run of his juvenile campaign and fourth start ended with Frankel racing off  an official mark off 123.

Result: A two and a quarter length defeat of Roderic O'Connor and the first of 11 Group 1 wins.

Rise +3lbs (New mark 126)

Greenham
The first start of an unforgettable Classic campaign saw Frankel rated 13lb clear of his nearest rival at Newbury.

Result: A four-length stroll beating Excelebration, who would prove a worthy but ultimately outclassed foe.

Rise: None (Mark 126)

2,000 Guineas
The first Classic of the season and one of the most memorable performances in modern-day history.

Result: A six-length decimation of the field, making most at a lung-bursting pace.

Rise +4lb (New mark 130)

Golden horn (frankie dettori) wins the derby

Golden Horn: took five runs to reach mark of 130

 PICTU Getty Images


Golden Horn

Feilden Stakes
Following a debut win at Nottingham, Golden Horn started this season on a mark of 90 at Newmarket.

Result: A straightforward length and a half defeat of Peacock, then rated 16lb superior.

Rise: +21lb (New mark 111)

Dante
Usually the strongest Investec Derby trial, this looked the case again, with stablemate Jack Hobbs the 2-1 favourite.

Result: The 1m2½f trip led to a new best as Jack Hobbs was seen off comfortably by two and three quarter lengths.

Rise +7lb (New mark 118)

Derby
Golden Horn's stamina for 1m4f was the major concern, but it proved to be no problem whatsoever.

Result: Frankie Dettori surged clear by three and a half lengths, again defeating Jack Hobbs.

Rise: +8lb (New mark 126)

Coral-Eclipse
Took on elders for the first time and received chunks of weight on the age scale.

Result: A drop in trip and change in tactics provided another three and a half length victory, this time Dettori making virtually all.

Rise +4lb (New mark 130)


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jul-08, 03:01 PM Reply #45 »
GOLDEN HORN (GB)Bay colt 2012 
Cape Cross
Bay or brown 1994
Green Desert
Bay 1983
Danzig
Bay 1977
Northern Dancer
Bay 1961
Nearctic1954 14-c
Natalma1957 2-d
Pas de Nom
Bay or brown 1968
Admiral's Voyage1959 4-n
Petitioner1952 7-a
Foreign Courier
Bay 1979
Sir Ivor
Bay 1965
Sir Gaylord1959 2-s
Attica1953 8-g
Courtly Dee
Bay or brown 1968
Never Bend1960 19-b
Tulle1950 A4
Park Appeal
Bay or brown 1982
Ahonoora
Chestnut 1975
Lorenzaccio
Chestnut 1965
Klairon1952 1-w
Phoenissa1951 5-h
Helen Nichols
Chestnut 1966
Martial1957 2-e
Quaker Girl1961 1-m
Balidaress
Grey 1973
Balidar
Brown 1966
Will Somers1955 1-s
Violet Bank1960 8-d
Innocence
Grey 1968
Sea Hawk1963 3-f
Novitiate1959 14-c
Fleche d'Or
Bay 2006
Dubai Destination
Bay 1999
Kingmambo
Bay 1990
Mr Prospector
Bay 1970
Raise a Native1961 8-f
Gold Digger1962 13-c
Miesque
Bay 1984
Nureyev1977 5-h
Pasadoble1979 20>
Mysterial
Bay or brown 1994
Alleged
Bay 1974
Hoist the Flag1968 5-i
Princess Pout1966 2-s
Mysteries
Chestnut 1986
Seattle Slew1974 13-c
Phydilla1978 6-b
Nuryana
Bay 1984
Nureyev
Bay 1977
Northern Dancer
Bay 1961
Nearctic1954 14-c
Natalma1957 2-d
Special
Bay 1969
Forli1963 3-b
Thong1964 5-h
Loralane
Bay 1977
Habitat
Bay 1966
Sir Gaylord1959 2-s
Little Hut1952 4-r
Lora
Bay 1972
Lorenzaccio1965 5-h
Courtessa1955 9-c

Offline worldisavampire

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« 2015-Jul-08, 05:04 PM Reply #46 »
Love the title change mate.   :lol:

Excellent.


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Jul-08, 05:34 PM Reply #47 »
 :beer:

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Aug-19, 10:02 PM Reply #48 »

Nuryana and her foal called fleche d'or, who later became dam of golden horn

Nuryana (left) and her foal Fleche D'Or, later the dam of Golden Horn

Long days and long nights made worthwhile

Julian Muscat pays a visit to the village of Cheveley and meets the dedicated and enduring team behind Golden Horn's early days.


CHRIS SMITH will be an anonymous presence at York this afternoon. He will have travelled up from Cheveley, a small village on the fringe of Newmarket, to reacquaint himself with a horse he knew in its youth. Smith is the gardener at Hascombe and Valiant Studs, where Golden Horn was foaled and raised before his transfer to John Gosden’s stable.

By staff consent Smith is the one among ten full-time employees who follows racing more closely than anyone except Hascombe’s secretary, Fiona McGlone. Although that might seem strange for a man not directly involved with rearing horses, it is often the way on stud farms. The staff are first and foremost stockmen.

As much is evident from the obvious question: which of them made the most money when Golden Horn won the Derby? It draws blank looks all round. There is obviously collective pride in graduates of Golden Horn’s calibre, but in the years ahead the horse who streaked to victory at Epsom will be remembered at Anthony Oppenheimer’s breeding grounds in other ways.

“Chris just wants to be there for one of Golden Horn’s races,” says Hascombe’s second in command, Steven Golding. “Mr Anthony took us to Ascot for the King George because he wanted us to see the horse. Unfortunately he didn’t run, but we thoroughly enjoyed it.”

Only when you visit these private breeding fiefdoms can you appreciate the expertise on hand. Golding is in his 29th year at Hascombe, a 290-acre pasture embracing three different land tracts. Winner of the Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association’s Stud Staff Award last year, Golding is responsible for foaling the stud’s mares. On March 27, 2012, a date etched indelibly in his mind, he oversaw the birth of Golden Horn.

He was summoned from his sleep by Heidi Steggles, whose internal clock has been turned upside down every winter for the last eight years. From January through to May, Steggles starts her 12-hour shift at 10pm, sitting alone in the foaling unit, waiting for signs that heavily pregnant mares are about to give birth.

“I love it,” she says. “It’s just me and the horses. All is peaceful and quiet.”

Steggles, too, was on hand when Golden Horn entered the world, the rich bay colt causing his dam Fleche D’Or no complications whatsoever. He would continue in that vein for the next 20 months.

Steggles has worked with horses all her life: she left school at 16 to work at Hugh Van Cutsem’s Northmore Farm. “I suppose one of the highlights of my life was when I was asked to look after Black Caviar when she came over here from Australia,” Steggles says. The detail makes a revealing snapshot of her professional standing.

It’s a recurring theme at Hascombe, where staff tend to stay put. The standard was set by Roy Gedge, who retired in 2013 after 47 years’ service, most of it as stud groom. And when Oppenheimer recruited Gedge’s successor he turned to Andrew Biddle, who had worked at Hascombe under Gedge before spending the lion’s share of a decade at Lord Derby’s Stanley House Stud.

While there, Biddle foaled down a chestnut colt out of Lord Derby’s outstanding racemare, Ouija Board. He would subsequently prepare the son of Galileo for the yearling sales where, in 2012, he fetched 525,000gns at Tattersalls. That turned out to be Australia, winner of last year’s Derby.

All those involved with Golden Horn’s formative months remember him for the best reason. Which is to say, they barely remember him at all. “Some young horses have major problems and others are very complicated,” Gedge says, “but this one was always very straightforward. You never really knew he was there. He was healthy and just did everything right.”

Golding believes Golden Horn’s placid nature is hereditary. “His dam Fleche D’Or was a lovely mare with a great temperament, as was [her own dam] Nuryana,” he says. “And all the foals we’ve had by [Golden Horn’s sire] Cape Cross have been quite good-natured.”

It’s a little-known fact that on the same day Golden Horn was foaled the stud celebrated another new arrival who would line up against Golden Horn on Derby day. However, the bay colt by High Chaparral was born in Ireland, rather than Hascombe. Sold as a yearling, he was named Moheet and ran in Al Shaqab Racing’s silks at Epsom, where he finished tenth.

Although Moheet was sent to Tattersalls in the same Hascombe consignment as Golden Horn in 2013, it was the presence of another yearling in the draft that probably ensured Golden Horn would return home unsold.

It has been well documented Golden Horn failed to reach his 200,000gns reserve. But that asking price was raised considerably 24 hours after Hascombe had sold a Dansili colt for 525,000gns.

Together with Golden Horn, the Dansili colt was seen as one of two potential stars in the draft. And when the imperative to recoup a handsome financial dividend was satisfied, Oppenheimer was content with the prospect of putting Golden Horn into training in the event his reserve was not attained. There were long faces everywhere at Hascombe that evening except in the proprietor’s house.

It would transpire that fate dealt Oppenheimer a helping hand. The 525,000-guinea Dansili yearling, subsequently named Bartholomew Fair, has won but a humble Yarmouth maiden from five starts. Golden Horn remains unbeaten in five.

Golden horn as a foal

Derby and Coral-Eclipse winner Golden Horn as a foal


HASCOMBE is run on the principle that staff work hard in exchange for their employer’s paternalistic embrace. “It’s a demanding job, especially during the foaling season,” Golding says. “You can have long days and long nights, which ties you to the place. You don’t really get the chance to get away but having a Derby winner like Golden Horn makes it all worthwhile.

“Many of the staff have been here for a long time and I think Mr Anthony likes that continuity.

“It builds up trust when you have familiar faces around. We always try to give him honest answers when he asks for our opinions about the horses and he is very approachable when you want to talk to him about anything. Mrs O [Oppenheimer’s wife, Antoinette] is exactly the same.”

As for the old chestnut that all and sundry at Hascombe were as sure as sure could be of Golden Horn’s golden future, Steggles lends a sense of perspective. “It’s almost surreal to have had a Derby winner through our hands,” she says. “There is usually one colt each year we think could be the one, but I think to say that of Golden Horn is probably wishful thinking.”

On that note, Golding and Steggles depart for lunch while McGlone, a relative newcomer of eight years’ standing, threads a path through a majestic tree-lined walkway, flanked by mature hedges, with paddocks on either side. The setting is befitting of the thatched stable yard through which you gain entry. The initials “JJ” – which commemorate Sir John Jarvis, who founded the stud in 1936 – are ornately engraved on an archway that houses an elaborately painted clock.

McGlone rode out at Sir Henry Cecil’s for four years before settling at Hascombe, where she has found her professional niche. She speaks enthusiastically about everything to do with the farm, from its many attractive features to its committed workforce.

“This is a way of life,” she says. “With studs, what people don’t see is all the work that goes into getting foals as correct as possible. Keeping them light; weight off the leg you want to stay straight; the paddock management, and so much more.

“People think we just throw the horses out and bring them in for the sales before making a small fortune,” she continues. “There’s a lot more to it than that. The bills are horrendous, but that said, we’ve had the best year anyone could possibly have.

“And the beauty of it is that the Oppenheimers deserve it. The whole thing has been a bit of a whirlwind. The two of them have been like children on Christmas Eve and you can’t help notice everyone is delighted for them. The boss had all his family there on Derby day; I thought he was going to cry.”

Gedge, for his part, laments that Oppenheimer’s father Sir Philip, who died 20 years ago, could not share in the Derby triumph he so craved. “I wish he had been here to see it,” he says. “It would have made him proud.”

And Gedge admits to a minor lament of his own. “In some ways I just wish I’d stayed on until Golden Horn had won the Derby and retired then,” he says. “But I suppose that’s hindsight for you.”

Whatever comes to pass at York this afternoon, nothing can detract from the fact Hascombe and Valiant Studs has achieved the pinnacle of breeding ambition. To win the Derby with a homebred horse is as good as it gets.


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« 2015-Sep-13, 10:57 AM Reply #49 »
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