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Everything Jockeys - Jockey - Racehorse TALK

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Offline westie

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O.P. « 2007-Jun-11, 08:55 PM »
The Jockey's Room

Ode To The Jockeys, our sometimes Forgotten Heroes, risking their lives on a daily basis
to make this Sport Of Kings go around.
We hit the turn a runnin’, but a funny day for me,
In the last, at last, no trouble as we fought on doggedly,
We were not aboard the favourite, for the fave it went to Bill,
And the first and second winners too, for Bill he ain't no dill,
But we mighta had him here ‘n now, this race just might have been, 
The one to put our name in lights, the one to set the scene,
To have us at the forefront, when the whips are cracking sweet,
With the horseflesh striding boldly, and the jocks in pretty seat.

But at the furlong pole he joined us quick, oh Bill ya’ here again,
With your showy silks and your polished boots,
And your horse with flashing mane,
But then my little mare sees Bill as well,
And she digs it in real fine,
And she leaves ‘ol Bill to watch our seat,
As we lengthen for the line,
And when the presentation’s done at last,
We all depart with Bill our friend,
And we’ll see ‘ol Bill at next weeks meet, and do it all again.

    ("Horse and Rider", the Winning Combination)

and this from A.B. Patterson


"A racehorse, it should be said, is not a thing that can be whirled round like a top. A horse at full stretch covers some eighteen feet of ground: he weighs three-quarters of a ton and his velocity is fifty-three feet per second. The rider has not only to make up his mind in the eight part of an instant but he has to try to convert the horse to the same way of thinking. Imagine, then, a big field, say twenty horses, in a short distance race, each horse requiring eighteen feet of ground to act in and each frantically determined to get to the front. They cannot all get off well even if the start is perfect, as some jump into their stride quicker than others. Imagine, then, what are the calls on a jockey's judgement when he finds himself wedged in among this flying mass of horseflesh, horses all around him, hoofs thundering, leather steaming, the white rails flying past. Crouched on his horse's neck, he sees nothing but the waving mane of his own mount and the heels and tails of the horses just in front of him. Some animal in front drops back a little, leaving a slight opening, and the rider has to decide in the twinkling of an eye whether he will go for the opening. He must not pull his horse out of his stride, just the lightest touch on the rein and the least possible change of direction is all he can allow himself. If he misses the chance, something else will be into the gap. If he goes for it and gets blocked, he may be worse off than ever."


Have you something good, bad or indifferent to say this is the place.
« Last Edit: 2008-Nov-30, 08:32 PM by westie »

Offline westie

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« 2008-Nov-30, 08:37 PM Reply #1 »
Dangers of the Profession

Make no mistake about it, being a jockey is a dangerous profession.

It takes training, skill and courage. Not only in controlling a huge animal but in the running of the race itself.

Riders must be ever alert and quick thinking, able to react to the changing circumstances and conditions that occur throughout a race.

They are required to ride horses at full gallop in company with numerous others sometimes with lesser training and with poorer skills.

And sometimes under heavy rain and in dangerously poor track conditions with the thought of accidents ever present in their minds. No matter how many precautions are taken, in horse racing, accidents are inevitable.

Accidents of course mean injury and injury means loss of income and maybe the inability to ride for long periods.

This can result in a loss of status, lose of reputation and loss of confidence.

Today many risk associated with horse racing have been reduced. The racing clubs have introduced many regulations to make horse racing safer. Heavy penalties for dangerous riding, extensive camera surveillance, smaller race fields, stewards controls and inquiries all reduce risk and encourage safe racing tactics.

Improvements to the basic skull cap and other riding gear greatly reduce injury.

However, horse racing is still a dangerous past time and over the years racing accidents has taken the lives of many riders and horses.

Since 1847, sadly 300 jockeys have been killed or died from injuries as a result of falls on racecourses throughout Australia.

That may be of surprise to some but the reason these deaths are not publicised is that they occur more often in country horse racing and attract little attention.

Hundreds more jockeys have suffered injury and hospitalisation as a result of incidents and accidents during races and training.

During the running of the Caulfield Cup in 1885, which was contested by a large field of 41 starters, two horses collided and fell at the home turn bringing down most of those following. Altogether 16 horses fell and 13 others were pulled up as a result. One jockey and one horse were killed and this is probable the worst racing accident to have occurred in Australia.

Horse racing is a lot safer nowadays but the dangers for both rider and horse are inherent in the nature of horse racing and are ever present.


Offline westie

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« 2008-Nov-30, 08:58 PM Reply #2 »
Accidents, Incidents and Falls

 

Horse racing is a dangerous past time and over the years horse racing accidents has taken the lives of many riders and horses.

Since 1847, sadly 300 jockeys have been killed or died from injuries as a result of falls on racecourses throughout Australia.

That may be of surprise to some but the reason these deaths are not publicised is that they occur more often on the country tracks and attract little attention.

Hundreds more jockeys have suffered injury and hospitalisation as a result of incidents and accidents during horse racing and training.

Horse racing is a lot safer nowadays but the dangers for both rider and horse are inherent in the nature of horse racing and are ever present.

Here are a few of those incidents;

    During the running of the Caulfield Cup in 1885, which was contested by a large field of 41 starters, two horses collided and fell at the home turn bringing down most of those following. Altogether 16 horses fell and 13 others were pulled up as a result. One jockey and one horse were killed and this is probable the worst horse racing accident to have occurred in Australia.

 

    In March 2005, in Victoria two separate race falls at country meetings resulted in the deaths of two jockeys, Gavin Lish and Adrian Ledger. 

    On the 11th June at Eagle Farm Racecourse Jockey Michael Cahill was dislodged from his horse after passing the winning post. Clinging to the reins he skimmed alongside the horse for about 100 metres before bringing the filly to a halt. A few hours later, Michael won the $1million Stradbroke Cup.

    In the early days, the track at Flemington was marked by a number of widely spaced posts set in the ground. But in the running of the 1878 Melbourne Cup a jockey a horse fell throwing it’s rider against one of the post and badly injuring him. As a result of that accident running rails were installed.

    In the 1881 Cup a dog ran onto the track and became entangled in the legs of one of the horses causing it to fall bringing down another horse who fell heavily onto it’s rider who later died from the injuries.

    In 1979, a horse was injured in the melee but did not fall. The horse, Dulcify, broke his pelvis and was destroyed.

    At Sandown in March, 2005, A huge flock of seagulls gathered on the track were disturbed by the horses approaching at the 200metre mark. The birds literally panicked and flew right into the horses creating chaos. Several horse shied and threw their riders. 5 Jockeys were left sprawling on the track and 3 were taken to hospital. In the eleven horse race, every horse was affected by the birds and the race was declared a “no race” under the rules. 

    Four jockeys were injured in a five horse collision at Canterbury on 16 January, 1985. It took nearly an hour for the scene to be cleared and the jockeys transported to Hospital.

    At a country race meeting at Lismore in 1988, Iris Neilsen was killed when her mount collided with a fallen horse. Iris was the first female jockey killed in Australian horse racing.


Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:45 PM Reply #3 »
Would just like to ask a question re the following Jockeys,
What does Nash Rawiller, Brad Rawiller, Damian Oliver, Luke Nolan and Craig newitt have in Common???

Offline Authorized

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:46 PM Reply #4 »
They are all good jockeys ?

Offline Authorized

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:46 PM Reply #5 »
The same 4th dam ?

Offline arakaan

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:47 PM Reply #6 »
They've all pulled up a horse.  :p

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:48 PM Reply #7 »
That is apart being among Australias Best Riders??

Offline Authorized

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« 2010-Jul-21, 04:50 PM Reply #8 »
There fathers were jockeys ?

Offline richo

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« 2010-Jul-21, 05:02 PM Reply #9 »
they all ride longer tham most jocks

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 05:10 PM Reply #10 »
You could all be right but not the answer I was looking for, they have something very specific in common, another with the same commonality is Chris Symons

Mark

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« 2010-Jul-21, 05:44 PM Reply #11 »
Spit it out sunshine..

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 05:45 PM Reply #12 »
Ray Murrihy doesn't think any of them are very "Brite"

Offline Falcon

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« 2010-Jul-21, 06:35 PM Reply #13 »
They're all males   :biggrin:

Offline Authorized

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« 2010-Jul-21, 06:55 PM Reply #14 »
You could all be right but not the answer I was looking for, they have something very specific in common, another with the same commonality is Chris Symons
Ray Murrihy doesn't think any of them are very "Brite"

Is Holywood Ray right ?

I would not have thought he'd have had much to do with Chris Symons ?

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 09:38 PM Reply #15 »
With the crack about Ray Murrihy I was being Facetious, my point was that what they all have in Common is that they are all strong proponents of the use of Spurs, Nash in particular has given spurs the credit for improving a lot of horses that he rides, and yet Murrihy is on record as saying categorically that they have no effect!! So obviously if Nash & Co continue to use them they must be slow learners according to Ray Murrihy, it follows a sure as night follows day! some trainers whose riders often wear spurs are Moody, Freedman and Waterhouse and the late Jack Denham, there are many more both Jockeys and Trainers too many to mention,
I know who I think isn't very "BRITE" and it isn't Nash and Co

Offline el zoro

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« 2010-Jul-21, 09:46 PM Reply #16 »
The topic of spurs has been brought up previously. Why wouldn't all jockeys wear spurs if it was legal?

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-21, 10:29 PM Reply #17 »
Because they listen to know it alls like Murrihy saying they do not work!! Bossy says they don't work, but then he never wears them so how would he know?? if you were going to ask someone what it was like to walk on the moon would you ask just any Astronaut or go directly to Neil Armstrong??
Of Course it is legal or no jockey would use them!!
I personally would like to see them banned they're cruel but if not at tell us when there is a "gear Change"

Offline Wyatt Earp

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« 2010-Jul-22, 10:26 AM Reply #18 »
Personally, I like the shiney ones with the pointy wheels that spin round and round. :yes:

Offline Authorized

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« 2010-Jul-22, 01:18 PM Reply #19 »
Because they listen to know it alls like Murrihy saying they do not work!! Bossy says they don't work, but then he never wears them so how would he know?? if you were going to ask someone what it was like to walk on the moon would you ask just any Astronaut or go directly to Neil Armstrong??
Of Course it is legal or no jockey would use them!!
I personally would like to see them banned they're cruel but if not at tell us when there is a "gear Change"

Myself and another forumite who seems to have given us the flick have been calling for them to be part of the gear changes for a while now.

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2010-Jul-22, 02:37 PM Reply #20 »
Myself and another forumite who seems to have given us the flick have been calling for them to be part of the gear changes for a while now.

Would be a tricky situation to keep track of Matt, and not sure how you would go about it.

A lot of the times, jockey's wear spurs, with out the trainers say so.

See the thing is, it is a jockey gear change, and not a trainer gear change.

Kelvin Wharton is one who wears them a lot here in Qld, and has a lot of success with them.

A lot of jockeys, can't wear spurs, as they ride to short, for them to be of any use.

So probably the best thing to do, is to recognise what jockeys wear them, and which jockeys do not.

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-22, 06:28 PM Reply #21 »
The thing is I have seen Jockeys like Larry Cassidy, Darren Beadman, Chris Munce etc wear them, all with success(Never seen these jocks beaten when they wear them) they don't wear them very often so how do you know when they are going to have them on?
Allinghi wore them when she won the Newmarket but was beaten either side of the Newmarket(Lightning I think and T J Smith) she didn't wear them in her beaten runs!
if a Jockey wears them without the trainers permission then he is a pretty poor trainer! I have never seen a Jockey wear them when riding for Bart Cummings! I remember Larry Cassidy using Spurs on 2 of John Hawkes's when he was stable rider, he was sacked shortly after, not saying that was the reason they parted company it probably just a coincidence but have never seen a Hawkes horse with a Jockey wearing Spurs either
Shocking had them on when he won the Hotham prior to his cup win, I backed him and remember the Caller saying he was badly blocked for a run and would have to spring quick if the run came, that was never in doubt for me when Rodd dug him with the spurs! not sure if he had them on in the Cup though that is not the type of race you would usually wear them!
Useless information I know but just illustrating the point, I can't believe that Murrihy can say they do not work when all the evidence says they do!
mind you they do not work in all situations you have to know when they will work! or know who knows when they will work!

Offline richo

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« 2010-Jul-22, 07:00 PM Reply #22 »
most jocks ride to short for them to be effective ride a bit longer and they are.

Jim Pike

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« 2010-Jul-22, 07:24 PM Reply #23 »
The Jockeys especially Munce for example are not noted for riding long!

Offline richo

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« 2010-Jul-22, 07:56 PM Reply #24 »
not many of them are built like chris.


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