Jeff Lloyd - Jockey - Racehorse TALK
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Jeff Lloyd - Jockey - Racehorse TALK

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Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2017-Feb-12, 04:01 PM Reply #25 »
Dave

I'm not doubting anything you say.

What are the attributes a world class jockey/ horseman possess that a world class jockey lacks?

 

Offline Dave

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« 2017-Feb-12, 06:23 PM Reply #26 »
The feel for a horse, hard to explain in writing, may be easier to explain what  a class Jockey possesses that a class horseman who isn't really a class Jockey doesn't, an instinctive sense of timing and tactics, Beadman was more of a Champion Horseman I feel than a natural Class Jockey, by that I mean when he had time off it would take him 6 months to get his timing back to it's best, it wasn't instinctive, I believe that is the real reason he went to Hong Kong when we had that interruption to racing in about 2007, Beadman worked hard to be a great Jockey, he could not afford to sit around and not ride on a regular basis, I believe he would have one of the highest IQ's of any Jockeys around, he knew his weakness and worked on it and overcame it, he made himself a great Jockey.......take Jim Cassidy, he could have 10 years out and would come back and be the same on day one as he was when he left, there is no thought process, it is all instinctive.....Rod Quinn was a great Horseman but only a fair Jockey, Shane Dye was a Great Jockey but only a fair Horseman.......a horseman can transmit his thoughts to the horse by feel and can change how a horse thinks..............there are very few horseman left..............they all ride too short to have any control and kids are taught to be jockeys, not horse people................and there is a difference between being a horseman on the ground and a horseman on the horses back too.................I dare say there are a lot of top trainers who have never actually been on a horses back..................of course it is only an opinion.....but that gives you and insight into my opinion on today's riders

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Feb-12, 06:41 PM Reply #27 »
Fair points.

What differentiates a horseman from a jockey ?


Offline Dave

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« 2017-Feb-12, 07:16 PM Reply #28 »
understanding the horse under you, communicating with the horse, too few around these days to really matter, what we really have now are trained monkeys, they ride too short to be able to communicate, Jockeys fall off at every meeting, often on the way to the start.......and I am not talking about falls, the horse doesn't fall, just the Jockey, their centre of balance is their ankles, the horse moves sideways and the Jockey falls off, the Horse stumbles or throws it's head down and the Jockey goes straight over it's head, Jockeys in places like Hong Kong started it, they invite the world's best riders there, when they return to their own Jurisdiction they started riding shorter so all the locals ride the same,,,,,,even 3kg apprentices, blood dangerous......if they set the driving standards for our roads based on the ability of Grand Prix drivers how dangerous would that be?.....in Hong Kong they race at 2 tracks so horses get to know their surroundings and they are ridden by the worlds best.............in Australia they race on a 1000 different tracks all round the country, ridden by some very ordinary jockeys......and we wonder why so many are getting killed and badly hurt! often new conditions every start, horses are prey animals, they are naturally wary of their surroundings, it is in their DNA, they scare very easy when they see something new or unexpected............jockeys train on rocking horses bolted to the floor.....they learn to be Jockey, I doubt they are really taught to understand a real horse with as much purpose..................you can't differentiate with the rules based on who is good and who is not so stewards should not allow any Jockeys to ride so short in Australia, it is getting them killed!

Offline fours

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« 2017-Feb-12, 11:33 PM Reply #29 »
Dave,

Beadman suffered when he went to Victoria and then there was his ride on Lonhro..... possibly the worst I've ever seen... even Lonhro exhibited body language that something was very wrong with the ride.
 
Otherwsie Beadman rather good indeed.

Fours

Offline Dave

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« 2017-Feb-13, 01:45 AM Reply #30 »
I assume you are talking about Beadman's ride on Lohnro when he was beaten by Grand Armee? He was beaten by a better horse on the day and by a great tactical ride,the connections of Grand Armee worked out what Lohnro's fallibility might be and rode Grand Armee accordingly to exploit that, give credit wher it is due, it worked!  Lohnro never could run a strong 2000, that is why he could not win a Cox Plate, sure he won an Australian Cup, he beat the immortal Delzao, need I say more?....he beat Sunline before the Cox Plate when she was below her peak, but I digress.......back to the Grand Armee defeat, he was closer to Grand Armee at the 200 than he was at the finish, he was losing ground and in another 50 metres maybe less he would have lost second place to Pentastic who was fast over hauling Lohnro.....what do you think Beadman should have done? obviously if he had gone earlier he would have got tired sooner and not even run second....Beadman was one of the greats, never disputed that........He made it look easy but I suspect had to work hard to make it look easy....where someone like Jim Cassidy was a more natural Jockey, not better, just did not have to work as hard on his timing etc it came natural to him

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-04, 01:24 PM Reply #31 »
63 kgs of Jeff Lloyd thumping up and down, how will the filly go ?

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-04, 01:30 PM Reply #32 »
Thankfully no need for that nonsense slamming down on her back.

Superb filly.


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Mar-04, 01:42 PM Reply #33 »
I thought his experience showed through when he dismounted while they loaded the others. As it was the race ran over 3 minutes late and he didn't subject her unnecessary load.    emthup

Offline westie

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« 2017-Apr-12, 06:26 PM Reply #34 »
Jeff Lloyd did well at the Sunshine Coast today, five mounts three winners a $10.00 win bet [total $50] on all his rides would have returned $599.00. Not bad for those that follow him, god knows what a parlay would have paid.

Offline sobig

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« 2017-Apr-12, 09:45 PM Reply #35 »
<a href="http://" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://</a>

While I agree Westie that he was exceptional (as usual lately) today a couple of his rides were replacements for the injured Jim Byrne

so a parlay or all up might have been unlucky.

Online Arsenal

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« 2017-Apr-17, 08:30 AM Reply #36 »
LLOYD RIDES HIGH ON AGELESS GLORY AS CHAMPION HOOP RECALLS STELLAR CAREER

Picture url=https://postimg.org/image/gwm3zc2ld/][/url]

IRONMAN: Jeff Lloyd after setting a new riding record in Brisbane. Pictu Grant Peters, Trackside Photography

Picture

FAMILY MAN: Jeff Lloyd with wife Nicola and sons Jaden and Zac and daughter Tayah.


AT an age when most jockeys have long retired, JEFF LLOYD is still breaking records as he explained to GRANTLEE KIEZA for our Sunday Session

You turn 56 this year but last week you broke Chris Munceís Queensland record for most metropolitan wins in a season

ó 103. You did it in eight months.

At my age people donít expect that sort of thing but Iím averaging 13 wins a month. Iím still riding like a much younger man.

I read that you plan to ride another 50 winners this season?

Iíll ride 100 if I can. Every horse I win on is lengthening the record further and making it tough for the next person to break it.

Youíve been a jockey for more than 40 years. Whatís the motivation to stay in the saddle?

I just love winning. If youíre not there to win you shouldnít be in the game. I never get lazy or take it for granted. If you asked me at 50 if Iíd still be riding at 55, I wouldnít have been sure. But as long as you keep yourself young and fit, and as long as you stay sharp so that your mind allows you do the things you want to do, anything is possible.

You suffered a stroke in 2013. Is it true that it actually added to your longevity as a rider?

It gave my body a rest. My lower back has been giving me problems for 10 years and I was riding in pain a lot of the time. I changed my style to suit my bad back. Everyone comments on the way I bounce on horseback but I couldnít do that for years because my back was too sore. The time off allowed my back to recover and it allowed me to ride the way I used to.

How long did you have off?

Fourteen months. The doctors said there was no way Iíd be riding again. When youíre 52 years old and you have a major stroke, no one would expect you to be riding races again. But I still felt I had more to give.

How did the stroke hit you?

I was just about to get on a horse on the Sunshine Coast and I had a very bad dizzy spell. I thought Iíd simply got up too quickly. Iíd fallen off a horse the day before and I was suffering bad headaches. I thought Iíd damaged my neck or back and it was causing the headaches. The next day I got off the ride at the Sunny Coast and went to the chiropractor. I laid down there and felt terrible. My head was spinning. The chiropractor sent me to get an MRI and it picked up that Iíd suffered a full-blown stroke. They feel that an artery to the brain tore from the whiplash I suffered in the fall. I ended up in intensive care.

Itís amazing that you came back so well. Being a jockey is such a tough sport physically.

Physically and mentally. Probably more mentally. There are so many ups and down in the sport that you have to be very mentally strong.

You were toughened up at a young age by the apprentice system in South Africa?

Itís like going into the army. Itís a five-year apprenticeship. You go into the academy from the age of 14 and the first year they start the torture chamber. They took me away from my family in Johannesburg for the first two years. I was at Durban and then three years back in Johannesburg. You get bullied and hammered and hit around. From age 14 to 15 you grow up 10 years in those 12 months.

Whatís your family background in racing?

None. Iíd never ridden a horse before I became a jockey. Never touched a horse. Dad was an amateur boxer and an electric engineer and Mum stayed home to look after all the brats. My dad wanted to be a jockey but never got the chance.

Why the affinity with the horses?

I was born in England and as a kid I watched all the top horses on the TV while my mates were outside playing. I watched Nijinsky, Mill Reef, those type of horses winning, and I fell in love with them. When I was 11 my family emigrated to South Africa as my dad was chasing what he thought would be a better future for us. I didnít even know they had racing there. We didnít have a TV and it wasnít until I was working in the garden on a Sunday to earn some pocket money and I heard the big race there which was called the Durban July in 1973. My father made some inquiries and we phoned the jockey club and said I wanted to be a jockey. I had to go for interviews where they checked my size and bone structure to see if I would stay small. The last interview was on the Greyville Racecourse where the big July race is run. Probably 30 or 40 kids rocked up and they cut it down to about 16. So off I went to the academy and I didnít see my family for two years.

You were six-times South African champion. When did you leave?

I left 11 years ago when I was 44. The crime was getting so bad that my wife and I did not think it was a safe environment for our three children, Tayah, Jaden and Zac. We went to Sydney first but we really liked the Gold Coast because the climate was like home with the warmer winters. My two boys have started riding. Jaden is 15 and Zac is 13. Iím not pushing them but they are getting keener and they ride a couple of days a week.

You had a great day at Caloundra last November?

I rode seven winners, seven of the last eight races. That was a great day. I did that three times at home but it was special to do it in Australia at the age of 55.

Youíve now ridden more than 5000 winners. What are your career highlights?

One was winning the Hong Kong International mile on a horse called Able One in 2011. He was a nine-year-old carrying a 50-year-old. It was a wonderful way to finish my career in Hong Kong. In 2006 I won the Singapore Gold Cup for trainer Patrick Shaw with a horse called Mr Line. And not long after we emigrated from South Africa I won the AJC Derby on Nom Du Jeu in 2008.

Who is the best jockey youíve seen?

Lester Piggott is my idol. I was lucky to ride with him at the end of his career in South Africa and England. He was 20 years in front of anyone in his era.

Whatís the best advice youíve received in your career?

From a young age my boss always told me to be the first at the track and the last to leave. Thatís the best advice I can give to any apprentice.


Giddy Up :beer:



« Last Edit: 2017-Apr-17, 08:40 AM by Arsenal »

Online Arsenal

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« 2017-May-24, 07:24 PM Reply #37 »
Veteran jockey Jeff Lloyd has set a Queensland record for the number of wins in a season, aptly aboard a horse trained by his main supporter, Toby Edmonds.

Prontezza ($3) raced away to win a fillies and mares race at Ipswich on Wednesday and give Lloyd his 156th Queensland winner and his 121st Brisbane metropolitan winner for the season.

Lloyd was earlier successful on Silky Brown ($6.50) and Eight Below ($9).

He had already broken Chris Munce's metropolitan record of 103 wins and he now has the state record to his name.

Edmonds and Lloyd have combined for a 56 winners this season.


"What more can I say about Jeff. He is the ultimate professional," Edmonds said.


"Prontezza is a nice mare with a lovely pedigree so I would love to get some black-type for her."

The Bryan and Daniel Guy training partnership took the rare opportunity to engage Lloyd who is usually booked by other stables.

"While we are based at the Gold Coast and so is he, he is usually booked up when we want him," Bryan Guy said.

"His only winner for me was on a horse called Flying Lamborghini back in the 1800s.

"That is how long it feels since he rode for me."


Guy has high hopes for Silky Brown, a two-year-old by Captain Sonador, later in her career.

"I think she might make a nice stayer later in her career. She had to make a 1000 metre run today and not many two-year-olds can do that," Guy said.

Eight Below was the second leg of a winning double for the Gillian Heinrich and Ben Rodgers training partnership with Chicago Nights winning earlier on the day.

"Eight Below can be tricky to ride but Jeff had ridden her at Caloundra before and knew what to expect," Rodgers said.

By Mark Oberhardt

BRISBANE, May 24 AAP

Giddy Up :beer:


Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Jan-01, 01:48 PM Reply #38 »
Fan's of Jeff got a nice reward in the last in Brisbane on Saturday booting home a massive winner.   emthup

But I just noticed a stat that needs to be shared ......

Jeff Lloyds last 25 rides on favourites at Metro meetings.

In that last 25 favourites he's booted home 19 winners   - only 5 of which were odds on.

Now that's about the most extraordinary stat I've ever seen.  :wacko:



Offline fours

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« 2018-Jan-01, 05:05 PM Reply #39 »
Wenona,

Lots of high strikes at the moment as the depth is thinner than normal giving the favs an easier time of it.

Fours

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2018-Jan-01, 07:53 PM Reply #40 »
Wenona,

Lots of high strikes at the moment as the depth is thinner than normal giving the favs an easier time of it.

Fours


Nonsense imo

19/25 with 5 odds-on is pretty incredible regardless of how "thin" the depth.

 

Online wily ole dog

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« 2018-Jan-02, 06:25 AM Reply #41 »
Ugly riding style but bloody effective

Online Arsenal

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« 2018-Jan-02, 09:42 AM Reply #42 »
Ugly riding style but bloody effective

Unconventional rather than ugly .............Jeff's a marvel ............let's hope he continues and no more health issues. :no1:

Another thing Jeff picks his own rides after a very successful stint with top riders' agent Cameron Partington.


Giddy Up :beer:
« Last Edit: 2018-Jan-02, 09:45 AM by Arsenal »

Offline arthur

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« 2018-Jan-02, 11:07 AM Reply #43 »
Another thing Jeff picks his own rides

 . . giving lie to the widely held belief that jockeys are bad judges

You could do a lot worse than follow his mounts . . but not on the pari-mutuel

Offline Devil

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« 2018-Jan-02, 11:25 AM Reply #44 »

Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Jan-03, 09:09 AM Reply #45 »
Well Jeff's on the pre-post favourites in the first three races at Doomben today.

Last night I took the $3.60 (2) Clockwork Orange in the first and it's into $2.60 with UBet. Looks a great chance.

I can't have the other two at the odds :

R2 - (1) Dauphin De France (Lloyd) must be showing something in private to be $3.00. It's a weak race but that's too short for me - I've had a small each-way bet on (8) Lady Selke at $35 this morning. (3) Page One & (7) Fortunately look the other major chances but anything could happen.

R3 - (1) Beat The Beast (Lloyd) was second at it's only start but again $3.10 looks skinny. I think (4) Boscobella has a  bit on these if it makes expected improvement on it's first up run and I've taken the $3.60 this morning. Wouldn't be surprised to see Boscobella end up favourite. Probably have a small each-way (7) Dream Wilder $41 as well.
« Last Edit: 2018-Jan-03, 09:12 AM by Wenona »

Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Jan-03, 12:32 PM Reply #46 »
Jeff gets the first favourite home with a nice ride - obviously knew the topweight would lead and the others didn;'t have a lot of early speed.   emthup

SP'd $4.20 on Betfair.
« Last Edit: 2018-Jan-03, 12:34 PM by Wenona »

Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Jan-03, 12:46 PM Reply #47 »
And he nails the second race favourite as well - $3.70 the tote.

That takes him to 21 in the last 27 (also won 18 of last 21)

I'll have to go back and look behind that 19/25 to make sure that didn't win.
« Last Edit: 2018-Jan-03, 12:48 PM by Wenona »

Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Jan-03, 01:29 PM Reply #48 »
Runs second on the favourite in the third - it seemed to be in a mood and not have its mind on the job.

OK that makes it 21/28 (18/22)

Online Arsenal

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« 2018-Jan-03, 08:28 PM Reply #49 »
Runs second on the favourite in the third - it seemed to be in a mood and not have its mind on the job.

OK that makes it 21/28 (18/22)

It got a mention in the stewards report not one of Jeff's best efforts imo

Giddy Up :beer:


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