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Michelle Payne - 2012 Lady of Racing - Jockey - Racehorse TALK

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Offline Gintara

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« 2015-Nov-03, 10:05 PM Reply #25 »
Can just imagine the extended family bbq with a bit of sibling rivalry "So where's your Melb Cup ...." or "Hands up who's won a Melb Cup" :p

Offline westie

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« 2015-Nov-03, 10:27 PM Reply #26 »
Magic moments. Danny Weir has two in the Kyneton Cup tomorrow Our Voodoo Prince and Akzar, Michelle will be on the latter.

Offline koolcat

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« 2015-Nov-04, 10:26 AM Reply #27 »
9I've loved Michelle Payne since she won the race I went close to winning in 1999 when she rode the Bart Cummings trained Allez Wonder in the 2009 Toorak Handicap and then rode the horse in the Melb Cup..but even though I'm a great fan of Darren Weir I couldn't back her in this years Cup as I was another stupid head that thought the Imports had the Aussies covered...I wish the media would get their stories correct as twice I've heard them say Michelle and Stevie share a house together but today on the ABC news Michelle said Stevie lives with Dad...this story has to have a movie made as it is so much more to offer than the movie The Cup and I firmly believe Bart has caught up with Michelle's Mum and they both helped those runs come for her in the 2015 cup seeing James or Anthony didn't get a runner in the race he would be rooting for the girl to win it. :flowers: :no1:

Edit...Michelle talked to CH9 not ABC Darren was on the ABC and CH9 wasn't happy with him not turning up there.
« Last Edit: 2015-Nov-04, 11:54 AM by koolcat »

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Nov-04, 10:35 AM Reply #28 »

KEVIN BLAKE'S BLOG

    Following jockey Michelle Payne's shock success in the Melbourne Cup, Kevin examines her comments that racing is 'chauvinistic' and argues that her outburst is likely to do more harm than good to the reputation of the sport.

Michelle Payne’s “chauvinist” comments leave a sour taste

The Melbourne Cup has long been known as the “Race That Stops A Nation”, but there is no doubt that it has truly become a sporting spectacle that resonates around the world. The sense of occasion and excitement is palpable through a television screen at the other side of the world and this year’s renewal produced a result that was a headline writer’s dream.

The contest was won by the unconsidered 100/1 shot PRINCE OF PENZANCE for Australian trainer Darren Weir, with jockey MICHELLE PAYNE becoming the first female to ride the winner of the race and the horse being led up by Payne’s brother Stevie, who has Down’s Syndrome.

It was a feel-good against-the-odds story that quickly spread around the world. Positive mainstream stories are hard to come by for a minority and often polarising sport such as horse racing. With one of horse racing’s most valuable unique selling points being that it is one of the very few sports in the world in which women compete directly against men, the positive attention generated by victories for female jockeys at the highest level is like gold dust for the game.

Thus, it was understandable that Michelle Payne was the focus of attention after the Melbourne Cup. It was a crowning moment for both her as a trail-blazing female jockey and for her racing family. However, when a microphone hooked up to the world was put in front of her, she chose to use that platform to label the sport that has given her a living as “chauvinistic” as well as having a pop at the horse’s owners with one named exception for considering a jockey other than her.

Unsurprisingly, her eyebrow-raising comments generated plenty of “right on, sister” positive reaction from the mainstream media, but while it gives me no pleasure to pour cold water onto what otherwise was a wonderfully memorable result for the sport, I wouldn’t be doing my job if I didn’t express my opinion that her comments were ill-judged, poorly timed and likely to do much more damage than good to both the reputation of the horse racing industry and to her colleagues in the female jockey ranks.

This isn’t a throwaway comment from a frustrated young female apprentice rider, this is Michelle Payne. She hails from a family steeped in racing and has had a long and successful career as a jockey, riding her first Group 1 winner back in 2009 and riding in the Caulfield Cup and Melbourne Cup in the same year. For her to tar the entire horse racing industry that has been so good to her as chauvinistic on the most high-profile of stages was truly puzzling to witness. Such a high-profile victory for a female jockey had the potential to inspire young female riders all around the world, but her post-race comments may well have the opposite effect.

Payne may have been unhappy that Prince Of Penzance’s owners considered another jockey for him, but when one looks at the facts, the likelihood of that being due to Payne being female are remote. There were just 16 Australian-based riders with mounts in this year’s Melbourne Cup. It is the biggest race in the country and competition for rides is always fierce, with many of the top jockeys in the world as well as domestic riders seeking out a mount in the race.

Michelle Payne is not in the top 16 jockeys in Australia. In fact, there were 132 riders that rode more winners than Payne in Australia last season and 66 that earned more prize money than her. Not to mention the multitudes of high-profile international riders that would have loved to ride in the race. That the owners of Prince Of Penzance stuck with Payne is a testament to their loyalty to her and they didn’t deserve to get accused of being chauvinists with one named exception in front of the world after the race. Be they male or female, jockeys lose rides on horses in preference for other jockeys that are considered better all the time. That is the nature of the sport. It isn’t chauvinism, it is meritocracy at work.

A consequence of Payne’s comments will be that rather than discussing her wonderful achievement and the incredible story surrounding it, the question on many people’s lips will be “is racing really a chauvinist sport?”

Given that chauvinism is essentially a mind-set that is next to impossible to reliably quantify, it is worth pointing out some relevant facts. Australia may often be stereotyped as a macho nation, but it is the leader amongst all major racing nations when it comes to giving opportunities to female riders. Over 50% of apprentice riders in Australia are female and five individual female jockeys have ridden Group 1 winners in the last decade. Indeed, 25% of all trainers in Australia are female, including the world-renowned Gai Waterhouse.

Given that Waterhouse presumably has no anti-female leanings, why have next to none of her big-race winners over the decades been ridden by women? Her answer to that question is almost certainly the same as it is for every other top trainer in the major racing nations, that they judge jockeys and give opportunities to them based solely on their merits, not their gender, background, nationality, or anything else.

I laid out my opinions on why more female riders do not succeed at the highest level in horse racing in this piece earlier this year. For me, accusations of widespread chauvinism carried weight 40 years ago, but nowadays it is no more than an easy excuse and a cop out to justify the lack of success of female jockeys at the highest level on level terms against men. The real truth of the matter is staring us as an industry directly in the face in the form of long-term statistics from around the world and evidence from other sports as outlined in the above article, yet the fear of being politically incorrect and accused of sexism is preventing many from engaging in this important discussion.

There would be nothing better for horse racing as a sport than for more female jockeys to succeed at the highest level, but as long as the sport continues to keep its head in the sand, such successes are likely to remain regretfully rare.


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Nov-04, 10:41 AM Reply #29 »
My Thoughts on Michelle Payne and the Battle of the Sexes

http://www.cappingwithcandice.com/   Candice Hare

In a breakthrough year for women in sports, another monumental accomplishment was achieved when Michelle Payne -- a 30-year-old veteran of the sport -- became the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup.

Following her victory, Payne had a stern message for not only her peers in the industry, but the sports world, as a whole.
 
[quote]“I would like to say that, you know, it’s a very male-dominated sport and people think we are not strong enough and all of the rest of it ... you know what? It’s not all about strength, there is so much more involved, getting the horse into a rhythm, getting the horse to try for you, it’s being patient and I’m so glad to win Melbourne Cup and hopefully, it will help female jockeys from now on to get more of a go. Because, I believe that we sort of don’t get enough of a go and hopefully this will help.”[/quote]

For these words to be uttered by a woman who has lived and breathed the sport since her childhood, whose siblings were also trained as jockeys and whose brother -- who suffers from Down Syndrome -- and strapped the very horse to win "the race that stops the nation" is as momentous as it is eye-opening. 

While strides have been made in recent times, there is little doubt that stigmas against both sportswomen and those who are disabled exist and yet with one win via a 100-1 longshot, the message that anyone can accomplish their dreams no matter the obstacles thrown in their way was displayed in front of one of the larger international audiences of the sport. 

The fallout has been massive with several applauding Payne's comments and others deeming them misguided or poorly timed. Questions of whether or not the sport is truly chauvinistic have been raised, again with wide-ranging responses. Blaming her for what some unfairly deemed as speaking out against the sport, however, is misguided. 

The fact of the matter is that these sorts of topics are never going to result in a singular answer. As easily as I could find five people who would say that horse racing -- and the world for that matter -- is full of male chauvinistic pigs, I could find just as many who would disagree completely. 

There is no universal truth. In this instance, the only truth is her truth. 

If Payne indicates that in her experience she feels she had to overcome her gender in order to achieve her goals, then from her perspective the sport is in fact chauvinistic and nobody should try to tell her otherwise. While others may not share the same experiences as she has within the industry, to say someone shouldn't feel discriminated against because it's not a universal truth for all is inappropriate.

As far as the timing of her comments is concerned, it's worrisome that critics have deemed said timing selfish, saying she should be a more graceful winner. It's when given this platform that role models in any community should speak out either against what they feel are injustices or to inspire the next generation. 

In a few short lines, Payne did both and, dare I say, taking the time from what was easily the biggest moment of her career was not only selfless, but it's indicative of her deep-rooted love for the sport. For her to choose a platform as large as the winner's enclosure at Flemington following a historic victory deems her message of such importance that she felt it worthy of an international audience of millions. Should one struggling young woman -- who has perhaps faced similar challenges to Payne -- find her dedication to the sport reinvigorated, the goal was achieved. 

Payne is a living example to young girls riding ponies that it can be done. Even they can win the nation's biggest race and her words merely back up her actions. 

Whether or not horse racing is universally a chauvinist sport should not be the takeaway from this statement. Instead, Payne let it be known that no matter what obstacles a woman faces, even she can win the big one.

Offline koolcat

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« 2015-Nov-04, 11:24 AM Reply #30 »
At the local club I used to go to a couple of times a week to their Sports Section but I haven't been since the first week of August as I was sick of hearing punters knocking the female jockey's especially one person who continually said the female's should be shot and never let on another horse,I was so sick of him selecting Michelle with his foul comments that I went to the management to complain about his continual comments and as it wasn't the first time I had complained I was a lot stronger in my beliefs this time so this particular person was finally banned from the club so I feel sorry for the only place in town that will allow him into their TAB owing to not many going there but he will always mouth off especially about female jockeys so there is chauvinistic males in Australia unfortunately.

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-04, 11:43 AM Reply #31 »
We can't expect the male species to agree that the racing industry is full of chauvinists.  They never will.....but it certainly is!

 Anyone who thinks it isn't has been living under a rock!  Onya Michelle!  onya!    :no1:

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2015-Nov-04, 12:27 PM Reply #32 »
We can't expect the male species to agree that the racing industry is full of chauvinists.  They never will.....but it certainly is!

 Anyone who thinks it isn't has been living under a rock!  Onya Michelle!  onya!    :no1:

That's a bit harsh Goldie, to say full of, is insulting to those that actually do believe the females can be just as good as their male counterparts and to those willing to put them on their horses.

If they are good enough, they will certainly be given an opportunity, Rachel Mason rode a lot of winners for us as did Lacy Morrison.

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-04, 12:39 PM Reply #33 »
Not insulting Magic!  "Full of"....means plenty around.....!  Not sparse! 

"if they are good enough they will certainly (certainly???)  be given an opportunity"....  :lol:       :no:........Bet if you asked all female jockeys that question, they would vehemently disagree with you! 

Just because you are fair and unbiased doesn't mean all other males are! 

Chauvinism in Australia is alive and well...in all areas/circles/businesses...make no mistake about it !  Only a fool would deny that! 

I'm not going to get into a discussion re this on this site! (of all sites!    :lol: )   It would be totally pointless!

 Have stated my opinion! And I'm a woman so I would know more on this topic than men - having experienced the "glass ceiling" in the Corporate world for over 30 years!   

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2015-Nov-04, 02:11 PM Reply #34 »
Plenty of male jockeys believe they are good enough also, but still struggle to get a ride.


Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-04, 02:19 PM Reply #35 »
A true saying..........."there's plenty of room in the world for average men but there's no room in the world for average women".........! 

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2015-Nov-04, 02:21 PM Reply #36 »
Not trying to detract from this thread and or the stigma facing female jocks Goldie.

There are some very talented young lady jockeys getting around and I feel that is only going to keep increasing, there in part, to the likes of Michelle Kathy ohara Claire Lindop and many others ;)

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2015-Nov-04, 02:22 PM Reply #37 »
Also by certainly given opportunities, I mean by those that don't have issues with female jocks

Offline Gintara

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« 2015-Nov-04, 03:16 PM Reply #38 »
10 to 15 years ago in racing I might agree but these days it matters not, if you're good enough you get the rides.

I was getting a bit sick of the main stream media turning this into a girl thing today.

She gave it a great ride and produced in a perfect spot to go on and win, it's what we expect from a jock in the top tier regardless of gender  💡

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-04, 04:17 PM Reply #39 »
10 to 15 years ago in racing I might agree but these days it matters not, if you're good enough you get the rides.

I was getting a bit sick of the main stream media turning this into a girl thing today.


Well it clearly does matter as she clearly told the world, many of the male owners wanted her off the horse, so "good enough" doesn't count! It sure as hell was a gender thing!    emthup


Offline Gintara

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« 2015-Nov-04, 06:12 PM Reply #40 »
Ever thought they just wanted a better jock  :bulb:

You know as well as I do that owners & trainers change jocks frequently regardless of gender.

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-04, 09:32 PM Reply #41 »
Clearly you didn't hear what she said on National TV......! 

Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Nov-05, 08:04 AM Reply #42 »


"if they are good enough they will certainly (certainly???)  be given an opportunity"....   :lol:        :no:........Bet if you asked all female jockeys that question, they would vehemently disagree with you! 

 

If you ask a female jockey just how good they rate themself will they be honest.

Most male jockeys are battling to get any rides at all.

Most male jockeys who get regular rides are riding at the bush and provincial meetings.



Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-05, 08:35 AM Reply #43 »
I'm not going to debate gender discrimination with men!        :lol:   :lol:   :lol:


Offline Authorized

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« 2015-Nov-05, 09:28 AM Reply #45 »

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-05, 10:03 AM Reply #46 »
  :lol:

Clearly she is at the end of her tether!  So to speak!     :lol:

Offline Gintara

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« 2015-Nov-05, 03:54 PM Reply #47 »
Clearly you didn't hear what she said on National TV......! 

Of course I heard it. Just because she said it doesn't make it right, in her mind she thinks she right, the reality might be a lot further away.

So I guess you believe everything you hear? Never question what's said?   :chin:

She rode a cracking race as most winners do, I just feel the media over did the whole girl thing, detracting from the fact she rode a great race.

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2015-Nov-05, 03:58 PM Reply #48 »
Not going to debate gender discrimination with you!  You'd know diddly squat about it!  Be like talking to a bucket of rocks!   :yes:

But continue on with your usual provocative, abrasive manner....as you always do! 

 :wavecry:

Offline Gintara

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« 2015-Nov-05, 04:43 PM Reply #49 »
I know diddly squat? Based on what? That I don't agree with you?   :lol:

I'm the best looking bloke on the planet. :no1:

Using your logic you must surely believe me? After all I just said it so it must be right  :bulb: Plenty 'round here have met me, surely they will back up what I've said is right  :p

Anyway can you please point out what I said in this post is wrong?

Of course I heard it. Just because she said it doesn't make it right, in her mind she thinks she right, the reality might be a lot further away.




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