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Nash Rawiller in strife - Jockey - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Nash Rawiller in strife  (Read 2526 times)

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Offline arthur

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« 2018-May-01, 10:46 AM Reply #25 »

Stranded Rawiller faces toughest of penalties for betting in Hong Kong
By Chris Roots29 April 2018 — 4:12pm
which saw Australian  jockey Chris Munce spend 20 months in jail in 2007.


Off topic and very 'picky' but spending 20 months in 'lag' in a calendar year (which wasn't even a leap year) would be a tough gig



What do they teach these days in "Journalism 01"?

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 12:49 PM Reply #26 »
As Chris Roots says:

but the 43-year-old is   facing the real threat of jail time, which most would consider excessive.


Jail time is way over the top. Yes. Most would consider it excessive except one or two characters on this thread    :lol:

The Hong Kong Jockey Club is administered by a country that has an atrocious record when it comes to Human Rights and scant regard for Freedom Of Speech judging by the number of political prisoners in their jails.

Putting someone in jail for this type of crime is barbaric and if any jockey is jailed (Australian or otherwise) it should be condemned by all decent Australian Racing participants. I don't share the sycophancy displayed in some quarters for the HKJC.

I could make a comment about politicians the depth and breadth of the world (including Australia and China) and their record on "self interest" and how a fair few of their own number should be the ones in jail for graft significantly larger than what Nash Rawiller is accused of. But that would be going off topic............

Offline Authorized

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« 2018-May-01, 01:07 PM Reply #27 »
Whether you think it is excessive or not I am sure he knew of the consequences should he get caught.

If you are not prepared to do the time do not do the crime.

I can not think of any greater deterrent than the consequences actually meaning something. Perhaps Australia could think along similar lines.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 04:54 PM Reply #28 »
Whether you think it is excessive or not I am sure he knew of the consequences should he get caught.

If you are not prepared to do the time do not do the crime.

I can not think of any greater deterrent than the consequences actually meaning something. Perhaps Australia could think along similar lines.

I feel for the family back in Australia. They must be worried sick.

Jockeys have always received slings out here and I cannot recall a winning jockey getting suspended over a sling let alone being put in jail.

My description of barbaric stands, and especially in light of the record of the Chinese government on justice.

Looking at Chris Munce's description of jail in Hong Kong it looks like it is what drug dealers deserve. Not Nash Rawiller.

I take it a step further. The Australian racing administrators should support the family by publicly stating they oppose jail time for our jockeys. The breeders should show their support by threatening to ban Hong Kong buyers from the Sales nationally. Unless of course they have sold their souls. And perhaps some other sanctions as well.

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-May-01, 07:13 PM Reply #29 »
What the heck do Australian penalties have to do with Mr Rawiller's situation ? I am sure (unless he is completely devoid of grey matter) that when he signed his contract to ride in Hong Kong he was well and truly aware of the consequences should HE decide to behave in a manner inconsistent with that contract. He even had a precedent (Munce) to guide him in the decisions HE made. He chose to flout their rules and now must deal with the consequences of his actions. We can't go beating a drum about Hong Kong, China or anyone else for that matter and their record in regards to human rights or whatever. They would only need to remind us to look in the mirror.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-May-01, 07:24 PM Reply #30 »
No further details on his fate coming out of Honkers ........ignorance of the law is no excuse ......so it's likely he'll face court and possibly spend some time in chokey ..if he's lucky like Chris Munce he may get paroled to serve time in an Australian Corrections Centre ........more like a Farm rather than an iron motel would be his best option.......I assume they exist in NSW his home state.

Giddy Up :beer:

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 07:44 PM Reply #31 »
We can't go beating a drum about Hong Kong, China or anyone else for that matter and their record in regards to human rights or whatever. They would only need to remind us to look in the mirror.

Can you give an example of a political prisoner who is in an Australian jail for speaking out against the incumbent government?

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 07:52 PM Reply #32 »
No further details on his fate coming out of Honkers ........ignorance of the law is no excuse ......so it's likely he'll face court and possibly spend some time in chokey ..if he's lucky like Chris Munce he may get paroled to serve time in an Australian Corrections Centre ........more like a Farm rather than an iron motel would be his best option.......I assume they exist in NSW his home state.

Giddy Up :beer:


I love that saying. "Ignorance of the law is no excuse" - it is pretty much what they say to political prisoners in places like China before they lock them up for a long time for nothing other than speaking their mind.

"Sorry. I didn't know it was illegal to point out that El Presidente is corrupt".

"Ahhh well. Ignorance of the law is no excuse."

The only other time I tend to hear it when someone - typically a judge - is lamely trying to justify a harsh and unfair penalty.

The farm friendly jails must exist in NSW - didn't Munce finish his sentence here?

(Nash is from Victoria  ;) )

Offline nemisis

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« 2018-May-01, 08:03 PM Reply #33 »
PP7 I been accused of being a "bleeding heart" most of my life but I agree with Gunbower.

Nash Rawiller is 42 yrs old .....how could he be so stupid?

Heavy scrutiny is part of the golden opportunity he was gifted......what was he thinking?







Offline gunbower

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« 2018-May-01, 08:22 PM Reply #34 »
Poison you can persecute a man in many different ways. Off the top of my head google the life of a man named John Sinclair of Queensland and you will find how a corrupt Government will , and can try to make life very uncomfortable for someone with a different point of view. Or read transcripts of say the Fitzgerald Inquiry how honest coppers received in the mail dog turds from their fellow officers because they exposed corruption within their ranks.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 10:24 PM Reply #35 »
You guys seem to fail to grasp the difference between a finding and a penalty.

It is the penalty that concerns me.

You think what fits the "crime" is if Nash is put in a jail cell with 30 others like Chris Munce was? 20 months? Serves himself right? Is that what I'm hearing?

The Rawiller family has been right up there with the Paynes as one of the great racing families in Australia and I think they deserve a bit more respect and support than anonymous so and sos on the internet telling the Chinese "do what you want with him - serves himself right". They would be all very upset at the moment.

A hefty fine and lengthy suspension is plenty for a discretion of this nature.

But jail? Some of you guys need to have a good hard look at yourselves. Compassion is a dead trait  :wavecry:

Online Jeunes

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« 2018-May-01, 11:15 PM Reply #36 »
Sorry PP, but I disagree with you and it is nothing to do with compassion. It comes down to respecting the laws of the countries you choose to live or travel or work in.

I have travelled to countries where I felt some laws were barbaric or outdated compared to Australian laws but I still followed them. Look at the number of Australian tourists who get themselves in trouble every year and we have people criticise the governments of the countries and make excuses for those caught.

We live in a great country but if you choose to go o/s, respect the laws of the countries you are in.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-May-01, 11:28 PM Reply #37 »
Geez. Tough crowd  :huh:

Online Jeunes

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« 2018-May-01, 11:40 PM Reply #38 »
Geez. Tough crowd  :huh:

ASIC could get lessons from the HKJC.  :lol:

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2018-May-02, 11:05 AM Reply #39 »
.


Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Jun-26, 08:42 PM Reply #40 »
Nash Rawiller’s life on hold as regulators investigate conduct
RAY THOMAS, The Daily Telegraph
June 24, 2018 2:06pm
NASH Rawiller faces a nervous two weeks as the Hong Kong Independent Commission Against Corruption continues its investigations into allegations the expatriate Australian jockey received gifts or money in exchange for race tips.

Rawiller’s passport was confiscated by ICAC eight weeks ago. The commission can order him to remain in Hong Kong for up to 10 weeks before either pressing charges against him or returning his passport.

The Hong Kong Jockey Club has already disqualified Rawiller for 15 months after finding he had twice accepted “pecuniary or other gifts for providing tips on horses he rode”.

Rawiller was also found to have “on diverse occasions had an interest in bets on horses, with those bets facilitated by people known to him”.


Jockey Nash Rawiller after winning the Group 1 Longines Hong Kong Sprint in December. Pictu AFP
The 43-year-old jockey’s disqualification is the longest issued by the HKJC since Australian rider Chris Munce was banned for 30 months over the “tips for bets” affair in 2008.

Munce was also jailed for 20 months after ICAC found him guilty of tipping for financial gain.

Fingers crossed for his sake that ICAC does not meet the deadline and returns his ticket to freedom .

Giddy Up :beer:



Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Sep-13, 07:31 PM Reply #41 »
Nash Rawiller reportedly back in Australia
Posted by: AAP+ at 6:41pm on 13/9/2018
Posted in: Horse Racing News
0 Comments
   
IMAGE: STEVE HARTJockey Nash Rawiller is reportedly back in Australia
Jockey Nash Rawiller is reportedly back in Australia after avoiding charges from Hong Kong’s Independent Commission Against Corruption.

The 43-year-old had been stranded in Hong Kong without his passport after being detained by the ICAC after Hong Kong Jockey Club stewards disqualified him for 15 months in April after finding him guilty of accepting money or gifts in return for race tips.

The South China Morning Post said on Thursday, Rawiller had left Hong Kong and returned home.

At the inquiry on April 25, stewards said there was “no evidence before the Stewards that N Rawiller had ridden any horse in Hong Kong with the intention other than to obtain the best possible placing for the horse.

“Further, the evidence before the Stewards was that N Rawiller had only tipped horses ridden by him and never horses he had ridden against.”

They disqualified him after finding he had twice received money or gifts in exchange for tips on horses he rode and had at times had an interest in bets on horses he rode.

In 2007, jockey Chris Munce was sentenced to jail in Hong Kong for tipping for financial gain after an ICAC inquiry.

Munce served 20 months of a 30 month sentence, the latter part in Sydney’s Silverwater jail after intervention from the NSW government.ENDS

Would have been on the first Sampan outa there once he got the word and passport returned.

Giddy Up :beer:

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Sep-13, 08:09 PM Reply #42 »
Can't believe how the "Racing press" goes looking for the opinions of jockeys on all matter of things. The majority , even the good ones , seem completely bereft of any grey matter. They seem totally thick.


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