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Offline timw

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« 2019-Jan-20, 07:27 PM Reply #750 »
I have been to all capitals other than Darwin and I never got Brisbane real estate wise even though I went there a bit.  According to one website the last sale was $154,000 in 1996 and it is on 761sqm.  Looking at the 1996 photo it had one garage - perhaps photographer didn't catch the front well?  Its funny (strange) that if this place was in a middle ring suburb in Melbourne  with no heritage overlay it would almost certainly be bulldozed 
 and be replaced by a 50-60 square 2 story monster built to the back fence (on a similarly sized block) possibly with a basement and a lift depending on the budget. That's the new Melbourne. 

Cheers

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Jan-21, 08:58 AM Reply #751 »
Tim I confirm the house was sold for that price I thought it was 1994 but probably 1996 is correct it would be from guvment records...it was built by the QHC in 1961  it cost 3750 pounds in those days I was earning about 15 quid a week... the house had two garage doors the same as shown in the current profile we raised the house and built in under in the 70's...landscaped the yard and installed the pool . .the current owners have renovated extensively installed the front deck and did a very good job overall....  I expect it'll go quickly although there's no yard to speak of for kids and the pool was a money muncher salt water chlorine but still looks in pristine condition......lots of older homes in the suburb have been renovated or replaced by modern structures some more appealling than others......currently there's a unit complex under construction on the way to the golf club made of prefabricated concrete blockswhich look  like old war time bomb shelters all installed by crane ...it looks like a monstrosity only half finished .

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Feb-17, 10:48 AM Reply #752 »
The BRC's decision to rely on the Liquor Act banning Ben Currie from Doomben and Eagle Farm seems extreme based on the provisions which allow licensed premises the right to remove and ban unruly or intoxicated patrons from their premises......I'm guessing none of which would apply to Ben Currie...while he was banned his horses were not ..that was a decision the BRC couldn't change....some time ago the golf club took action against two members both removed from the clubhouse after an incident after a club competition on a Saturday ..one received a one month ban .....and is since back playing and behaving hisself.......the other was hit with an unspecified indefinite ban and is still excluded ...that was months ago ......... the Club could have exercised the disciplinary provisions in the constitution in the second case which would have given the club the right to impose specified sanctions on him and in the event of serious penalties which from what I have heard of his behaviour the most serious sanctions would likely apply.......if so  he would have the opportunity to appeal to the full membership...who would decide to confirm or dismiss or amend the board's decision ...as it stands this guy has lost his membership privileges cannot enter the clubhouse or the golf course and cannot play golf ..what he has done or intends to do is not known to me ...he is still on the outer .......so Ben Currie although treated unfairly IMO still retains his right to train .....almost a double at Doomben yesterday and with runners at Toowoomba last night I haven't checked the results....he has legal issues to finalise one next Friday will be crucial tohis future.

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« Last Edit: 2019-Feb-17, 10:49 AM by Arsenal »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Feb-26, 06:44 PM Reply #753 »
I've just finished reading a very good book ..paperback fiction set in Sydney ...by Richard Beasley SC the same RB who sits on Racing NSW's racing appeal panel ..his book  "The Burden Of Lies" is a  fascinating story of crime, corruption, murder, relationships and betrayal culminating in a jury trial of his client......the main character is Peter Tanner a criminal lawyer has a way with words...lots of quotable quotes..well worth reading if you like a good yarn .

SMH review "Up there with the best of those legal eagles on page and screen ....A cracking read."


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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Feb-27, 08:16 PM Reply #754 »
I had a game of golf today with a guy I've not met before.... he said he usually plays in the morning field that's probably why I haven't run into him before ..... A very big hitter off the tee but his short game isn't in tune with his driving distance ....neither of us played well.
Darryl is his name  and he was very  good company.....  most enjoyable to play with...very laid back we enjoyed a chat and a joke. He told me He's a boilermaker and works in the mines has 4 days on 4 days off and is a member of the AMWU.

This reminded me of one of my old mates Jack Egerton who I came to know well through his son Ron .Jack was a boilermaker by trade and was head of the Qld Trades and Labor Council as well as President of the QCE the Labor Party.....he was knighted for his contributions to society but it never changed him he was always just Jack to his friends although his knighthood did lead to some well remunerated appointments QANTAS was one I remember
.
Many years ago in the early years of night trotting Ron Egerton and I were on the committee of the forerunner of today's BOTRA ..... I don't recall its name only that it was a representative body for the harness racing participants.........we arranged a deputation to the then racing minister Bill Knox to convince him to appoint some industry representatives to  the QHRB ....from a list of names we gave him ......Sir Jack Egerton and Ian Wylie QC later a judge were both appointed to the harness board...sadly they are no longer with us.

My other connection to the AMWU was my very first  case as an industrial advocate  in 1964 or 1965 before a Full Bench of the State  Industrial Commission ...it was an application based on comparative wage justice.... the like with like argument for fixing wages ..which was the path to success in those days  ....I argued for a flow on of increases awarded under the Metal Trades Award  to  our members employed under Part vi of the Public Service Award –State.......this followed a  decision in the Federal Arbitration Commission  brought by the Metal Worker's Union resulting in  a massive increase of two pounds two and six a week .....it was a winning result for us but not to the full extent claimed......we usually faced strong opposition from the PSC and seldom got what we asked for..there were no sweetheart deals in my time.

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Offline gunbower

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« 2019-Feb-27, 08:52 PM Reply #755 »
Arsenal,  Plenty of memories with your story. Do you remember the outcry when the strong Labor man, Jack Egerton accepted the knighthood. It was totally abhorrent to the principles and history of the Labor Movement. I , for one , think it tarnished his reputation within the Party forever.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Feb-28, 11:12 AM Reply #756 »
Arsenal,  Plenty of memories with your story. Do you remember the outcry when the strong Labor man, Jack Egerton accepted the knighthood. It was totally abhorrent to the principles and history of the Labor Movement. I , for one , think it tarnished his reputation within the Party forever.
I do gunbower and you're right Labor disowned him...very unforgiving of some not so others...... I particularly recall Gough Whitlam referring to him as "Sir Toby Belch"  on his knighthood to make it worse it was a Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen action by which HM graciously doffed Jack......Gough conveniently forgot it was Jack Egerton through Tom Burns who saved his leadership while the great man ..who I admire....but not his disrespectful comments about Jack....was sitting outside the Federal ALP conference room awaiting a verdict onhis leadership from "the faceless men" that vote orchestrated by Jack Egerton saved Whitlam's bacon so the story goes.

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Offline gunbower

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« 2019-Feb-28, 07:59 PM Reply #757 »
Very true Arsenal. There is no question Egerton did some great things for the party : especially in regard to reform of the ALP Conference. Sadly though his legacy, like others such as Hughes , Lyons , Gair etc will always be of one who sold out his values for his own personal betterment . I think the depth of feeling amongst "The True Believers " was even more severe because of the involvement of Bjelke -Petersen whom I think is probably one of the most reviled  political leaders to Labor Party people in the history of this Country. Naturally I exempt P Beattie from those comments.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Mar-03, 10:15 PM Reply #758 »
Luck's a fortune .....good luck that is...we all have a share of bad luck...I had no luck at all on Friday at golf ..hit a nice tee shot I thought until it curved into the rough on the left hand side of the 8th ...this is a photo I took on my phone...slap bang up a great big gum tree...had to take an unplayable lie which ruined the hole.



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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Mar-14, 08:38 PM Reply #759 »
Thanks to R.Ackland editor of Justinian " A reasonable doubt for a reasonable price"  I've discovered the writing talents of Richard Beasley SC who heads the RNSW appeals panel ...I 've just finished his brilliant novel "Me and Rory MacBeath "   he has a few more to his credit which I hope to pick up "Hell Has Harbour Views" was on ABC TV but no longer available on iview I might get lucky and find the DVD......another one yet to arrive at my humble abode is "Cyanide Capers" a Peter Tanner fiction...and I have had no luck in trying to find "The Ambulance Chaser"

Highly recommended reading the two I've read.  :king:


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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Apr-08, 10:29 PM Reply #760 »
I've just finished watching Season 1 of After Life a black comedy on Netflix with Ricky Gervais in the leading role only 6 episodes a few laughs and Ricky is at his irritating best for most of the episodes still well worth a look if you can tolerate Ricky's form of comedy.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8398600/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1

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« Last Edit: 2019-Apr-08, 10:32 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-May-05, 05:20 PM Reply #761 »
Clubs’ digital death sentence
DARREN CARTWRIGHT

FORTITUDE Valley and the CBD have become a graveyard for clubs with the long-established Public Service Club the latest victim and one of more than 160 venues to close statewide in the past decade.

Members voted unanimously last month to wind up the 55-year-old entity – just 12 months after it re-opened in its new Tank St location. It was forced to relocate from its William St base because of the $3.6 billion Queen’s Wharf development.

Liquidator Peter Lucas, of P A Lucas and Co, said the demise of the Public Service Club was not only the end of an era but the last of its kind in Australia.

“It’s been around for 50 odd years or so and it’s the last public service club to close its doors in Australia,” Mr Lucas said. The Public Service Club sits alongside the Irish Club and Brisbane Polo Club as the more notable venues within the CBD to bite the dust in recent years.

Clubs Queensland chief executive Doug Flockhart said he was saddened, but not surprised by the news and doubts if any small venue can survive in the Valley or the heart of Brisbane. “This club was challenged by being in the CBD, no different to the Irish Club, because of consumer choices,” Mr Flockhart said.

“The CBD and Fortitude Valley for the club business, except for private clubs like the Queensland Club and Tatts, the writing has been on the wall for some time.

“I’m saddened by it, but not surprised, and it comes back to the fact the public service has changed as well and people are time poor.”

Former Public Service Club vice president Matthew Donaghue said the Tank St location was far from ideal.

It was positioned well away from its membership base at the top end of George St and that, combined with a 15 month delay between vacating William St and re-opening, worked heavily against it.

“The relocation to Tank St did not work. Simple,” he said.

“It will be missed, but economically it has become another memory of what Brisbane had and has lost.”

Smaller clubs, like the Public Service Club, are on notice, said Mr Flockhart. He said the rise of online bookmakers, the increasing popularity of Uber Eats and tighter smoking regulations have worked heavily against local clubs in recent years. Wagering on horse racing can all be done from home, Mr Flockhart said.

ENDS

The original  State Service Club opened in the basement of the QSSU premises in 67 Elizabeth St Brisbane  in 1966....and existed at that site at least until 1987 when the club celebrated it's 21st Anniversary.........in 1963 or thereabouts construction started to expand the old building by erecting a three story structure on the vacant land at the rear of the premises resulting in refurbishing  the union offices a new conference hall and the State Service Club....  when I started working for the QSSU in 1963 our office consisted of two rooms and a conference hall with a couple of shops..... a luncheonette and a news agent tobacconist with a barber shop at street level .....  P J Bredhauer was QSSU General Secretary at the time and I was on the bottom rung of the ladder behind him and T J Wallace the Industrial officer .... PJB sought advice from Joe Borsallino as to how to go about establishing the club facilities...... the first manager was "Major" Booth his wife an accomplished chef ran the kitchen...it was very popular with the members very convenient for those located at the top end of town in the government precinct ..but too far away from those elsewhere....certain members of the press were regular patrons Max Jessop a great patron and exceptional journalist is one I remember fondly ...the building eventually  was sold to Seymour Developments and the Public Service Club was relocated to premises leased by the State.....and now it is no more.

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-May-07, 08:14 PM Reply #762 »
I ran into a guy I know yesty  whose a barrister-at- law works for the DPP prosecutes crooks ....told him "I saw you had a big win the other day got quite a write up in the paper' ..he replied "Well yes it was a win but hard to lose a case when he pleaded guilty"

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-May-15, 05:59 PM Reply #763 »
I've just finished reading Richard Beasley's second novel The Ambulance Chaser the story is built around a disbarred barrister who investigates suspicious deaths of claimants who face significant compensation from a monopolistic insurance company ........a very engaging story with numerous characters all set in Sydney ....Richard Beasley has a great SOH which he incorporates into the story line well worth a look if you're interested in legal and illegal activities .....so all that's left is to get my hands on his first novel "Hell Has Harbour Views" and that'll complete my reading of all of his offerings so far.

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Jun-05, 06:27 PM Reply #764 »
I watched DEADWOOD the movie on Monday night set in 1899 to celebrate the State of Dakota gaining statehood Ian McShane as Al Swearengen very aptly named character owner of The Gem Saloon and Whorehouse on his deathbed being serenaded by the crippled cleaning lady with Banjo Paterson's immortal verse Waltzing Matilda a check revealed Banjo composed this poem on Dagworth Station near Winton in QLD in 1895.

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Jun-17, 06:15 PM Reply #765 »
I've just finished "HELL HAS HARBOUR VIEWS" by Richard Beasley SC this was first printed in 2001 reprinted again in 2005 and 2009 and the current issue is a 2019 reprint it's set in Sydney Australia's largest law firm and was adapted by the ABC for TV in 2005 well worth finding if you enjoy humour and lawyer talk ...other books by the same author are THE AMBULANCE CHASER......ME AND RORY McBEATH .....CYANIDE GAMES and THE BURDEN OF LIES the last two are Peter Tanner thrillers all very readable.....and at a reasonable price.

A few lines about the author from his  book...originally from Adelaide he worked as a barrister in Sydney since 1997 ....."Through what some lawyers think one of the world's longest typographical errors, he was appointed silk in 2011............HELL has been hailed as a "penetrating biography of our firm" by countless young lawyers around the globe.
 
It remains an uncredited resource for members of the Australian judiciary when giving speeches lamenting the scandalous expense of legal services ,a matter that strangely failed to trouble many of them during the course of their careers pre elevation to the bench.

 It,and Beasley's subsequent thrillers ,are shortly to be made compulsory reading for any law graduate seeking a practising certificate in any jurisdiction."
A third Peter Tanner novel is work in progress. :thumbsup:


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Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Jun-18, 05:12 PM Reply #766 »
Evan Whitton 1928 -2018 had a way with words...... in his Can of Worms covering the Wran Royal Commission, amongst other interesting cases, he painted a graphic word picture in his descriptions of those involved as each witness or barrister took part in the proceedings......the Remington or Olivetti described the dress or appearance of the subject......George David Freeman who was one of the subjects in Channel 9’s Suburban Gangsters  show on Sunday night last ,was one witness mentioned in Evan Whitton’s daily report.
He is mentioned frequently, this is just a snippet of the great writer’s words.

“The morning session got off to an intriguing start. First to rise –and putting me  irresistibly in mind of an ibis coming out of a swamp –was the tall ,balding and angular Desmond Anderson, for George David Freeman ,horse race tipster for Murray Farquhar,former chief stipendiary magistrate . Mr Anderson begged leave to withdraw from the Commission until such time as Mr Freeman should actually have to give evidence ,thought to be next week.

‘There is a matter ,’ Mr Anderson said ,’of a stretched financial position affecting my client, impecuniosity.....’ Which suggested that, sadly, Mr Freeman’s remarkable facility for foretelling the result of horse races –stated in 1977 to have been within two percentage points of being totally accurate- has, only momentarily ,we hope, deserted him.”


Evan Whitton was a teacher at Downlands on the Darling Downs he later worked for The Toowoomba Chronicle and several other news papers he was a delight to read especially in covering the Fitzgerald Inquiry in the mid 1980’s.

Brief extracts follow  from the Musswellbrook Chronicle on Evan Whitton’s career....with a link to the whole article.

"Whitton won five Walkley awards for ground-breaking journalism and the Graham Perkin Australian journalist of the year award in 1983 for “courage and innovation” in reporting for The Sydney Morning Herald the Street royal commission. This examined allegations that chief magistrate Murray Farquhar had tried to influence a court case against rugby league boss Kevin Humphreys and that NSW premier Neville Wran may have influenced Farquhar. Wran was cleared, Farquhar jailed and Humphreys convicted."

"Whitton had led development of a form of new journalism – writing non-fiction as a meticulously researched narrative, linking detail of characters and events into patterns with dialogue, atmosphere and tone. His stories could be challengingly long but he broke them up “with a joke every 30 pars or so”. He used this technique at the Street commission and the Fitzgerald inquiry."

https://www.muswellbrookchronicle.com.au/story/5545183/obituary-evan-whitton-1928-2018/

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