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Offline dubbledee

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« 2010-Dec-28, 08:50 PM Reply #25 »
ED, you should be able to reduce the size in your image software.

I've downloaded it, and re-sized.  Hope that's OK.

Offline El Dufus

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« 2010-Dec-28, 10:30 PM Reply #26 »
You assume too much optimism in my computer talents, DD.

Image software? What's that?

I just went to the little "Link Inline Image.." thingy above the message screen and clicked on "Inline Fullsize Attachment", then went down to browse, found the image, and attached it.

That's the extent of my attachment skills.

Thanks for the edit - it looks much better.

ED

Offline dubbledee

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« 2010-Dec-29, 11:09 AM Reply #27 »
ED

A few points that might be helpful.

1.  To display an image such as I did (of your photo) I use the "inline fullsize attachment" option in the drop down box to the top left.

2.  Before displaying your image, I saved the one you posted to my hard drive, then sized it down using the software I'm familiar with (Graphic Workshop Professional).  There are many other such programs around.  Many use PhotoShop.  I don't know whether the standard Windows image software (that comes with Windows 7, for example) allows you to scale down images.  Others will be able to answer that, and may well be able to recommend a simple software package for you to try.

3.  With regard to "sizing down", it's worth getting a bit of background knowledge on image dimensions.  As a starter, digital images are usually measured in pixels - the more the pixels the bigger the picture.  They also have a "size" expressed in bytes, or kilobytes, etc.  As an example, the original image you posted was 2048 x 1536 pixels, and had a size of 571 kb.  The one I posted - after scaling down - was 614 x 461 and was just 44.9 kb in size.  That's the reason it fitted more neatly into the viewing window.

You might find this link useful:

http://www.eznetu.com/Graphics/PhotoPrep.html

Offline Norton

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« 2010-Dec-29, 12:07 PM Reply #28 »
Oh.

Offline gratlog

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« 2010-Dec-29, 12:25 PM Reply #29 »
Really enjoy that Doc Martin show.

  We had a Doc like that in the army.  I was going overseas once and had to have a medical clearance.  Doc rang me up and asked how I was feeling and when I said OK he replied that I had just passed my medical.
   Only the week before I had beaten him in a game of squash and I think that he was still p----ed off with that  :biggrin:

Offline El Dufus

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« 2011-Feb-21, 12:20 PM Reply #30 »
This story is about Russ Hinze, who was the "Minister for Everything" back in the Joh Bjelke-Petersen days. Russ is most remembered for his stints as Minister for Main Roads and Racing.

I have no idea if the story is true or not, but I've always thought it was a great yarn, and just so typical of how things were done in the good ol' days of Joh, Russ, and all of the other white shoe brigade cronies.

Russ was very involved in the racing industry and owned a stud at Oxenford, on the way to the Gold Coast. It was called Waverley Park after his great horse Lord Waverley of Cox Plate Bonecrusher fame. He also had a large business interest in a sand and gravel company on the Gold Coast which provided a lot of material for roads and other similar projects. Hence he was an "ideal" choice to be Minister for Main Roads and Racing!

But as his health deteriorated after his political life had ended, the stud was sold, and some twelve months down the track, the new owner (name I can't recall) realised he had never received an electricity bill.

Many of you will know that during the foaling season, all paddocks containing broodmares about to give birth are lit full-time at night, so the resultant electricity bill is horrific. The new owner did not want to be hit with an enormous bill, and was concerned that an administration error had led to the non arrival of his electricity account. His concern was understandable.

The electricity department obviously undertook an investigation into the reasons for the oversight, and the reason soon became clear.

Waverley Park Stud had been connected to the Main Roads street light circuit, so had an endless supply of electricity!

After the investigation, the "oversight" was quickly rectified.

Aaahhh, the good ol' days!

ED

PS Apologies to any of Russ's rellies who might be reading this. No harm meant - just a funny story entering into folklore!
 

Offline El Dufus

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« 2011-May-13, 05:17 PM Reply #31 »
My younger brother has his own specialist cruising travel agency, and a few weeks ago he contacted me to say P&O's Pacific Dawn had two cabins with balconies left on a 7 day cruise to Noumea, Lifou, and Vila, and was I interested. I quickly rang some friends who are also retired, and after a quick conversation, we grabbed them.

I'm not really a cruise person, as I prefer getting to a location quickly and having time to look around, rather than taking time to get there and then not much time to look around.

Nevertheless, we'd never been to the South Pacific, so this was another retirement adventure.

I have to say we had a terrific time.

The Pacific Dawn is a 70,000 tonne ship with capacity for 2,000 passengers and 700 crew. It was fully booked for this trip. A ship that size cuts through the sea very easily but you still feel the roll in a good sized swell. Luckily, my wife and I do not get seasick, but on the first day at sea in a 3 metre swell more than 500 people attended the medical centre! On the last day of the cruise, we had a 5 metre swell and the dining rooms were about half full - more food for us.

For those of you who have not taken a cruise, your cost includes all meals in the common dining areas, but not your alcohol. The common dining areas consist of a buffet where everyone just lines up with a tray and you eat an enormous variety of food, or a more formal dining room where you book a table (usually sharing with someone else), and order from an a la carte menu.

There are other dining rooms on the ship where you book your own table, and pay for the entire meal yourself.

The buffet (lovingly called "the trough" by seasoned cruisers) is ideal for breakfast and lunch if you don't mind lining up for your food, but the more formal dining room is better for dinner. Casual dress is OK for "the trough", but collared shirts and long trousers are preferred for dinner.

I have to say that our excursions to "the trough" provided ample evidence of the epidemic of obesity that is overtaking Australia. Without labouring the point, it was an eye opener of the worst kind.

The cabins were immaculate, and to have a small balcony outside where you can relax and watch the ocean is just superb. I spent many an hour just reading the latest John Francome or Daniel Silva books with the seabreeze in the face and the sun shining.

I can't describe the number of activities provided on board, some with a modest cost, and most for free. They are just too numerous, but there is no excuse for boredom. Sports, arts and crafts, trivia, cards, fitness, cosmetics, an art gallery and many more.

There is a casino for the gamblers, and there are about 7 or 8 bars if you just want to drink yourself into oblivion. There is a show lounge with a different stage show every night, all of good quality.

And activities for children abound, so families are well and truly catered for.

There are two swimming pools (which are closed in rough weather), and many, many deckchairs for the sunbathers.

With two thousand passengers, this was a floating town, and we met some really interesting people over dinner or drinks.

Noumea was a bit "tired", Lifou was a beautiful coral reef island, and I was a bit disappointed in Vila the town, but not the resorts (a very long lunch!) , but that did not detract anything from the week. They were all still recovering from a cyclone earlier in the year.

The trip home was a bit rough, and many passengers found the swell quite difficult.

I have to say that the four of us had a really good time, and I'm sure that we will take another cruise at some stage in the future, as Australia is becoming a cruise Mecca for many of the shipping companies, and more and more of the large ships are making us their base in our Summer months.

ED







Offline El Dufus

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« 2011-May-30, 02:39 PM Reply #32 »
.
« Last Edit: 2011-May-30, 02:43 PM by El Dufus »

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Jan-31, 11:53 AM Reply #33 »
I think it's early onset ........!

In real life, I rarely dream.

If I do dream, I rarely recall the details, just know that I had a dream about something.

This morning I woke myself up at 5.30am laughing out loud, and I could recall the dream in detail.

I was changing jobs. I was leaving my previous job (no idea what it was), and I was joining Queensland Treasury Department on the following Monday (I have never worked for the Qld Government, and I have been retired for over two years).

But I had work to complete at my old job before I felt I could leave, so I stayed on for the Monday, but did not inform Qld Treasury that I was not starting until the Tuesday.

I had a lovely farewell at my old job on the Monday.

On Tuesday morning, I was walking down Queen Street in Brisbane looking for the Treasury Building. For some reason, it was the original beautiful old Treasury Building of thirty years ago (now the Treasury Casino), but in my dream it was situated somewhere further down Queen Street near the old Lennons Hotel.

I found it eventually, and phoned my new boss from the ground floor to tell him I had arrived and I was sorry for not showing up on the Monday, and not even advising him. I had been delayed "in the country" (I have no idea why I lied!)

He wasn't happy, and said he had to consult the rule book to see if I still had the job.

I hung up the phone, took the lift up to his floor and walked in to his office without knocking. He was dressed in a very conservative dark three piece suit and looked very severe and unhappy. He scowled at me.

I put my briefcase down right in the centre of his desk, and opened it up. He was horrified at this total lack of manners, and I suddenly noticed a lot of other people in his office.

I then proceeded to perform some magic tricks with coins and cards (in real life, I couldn't do a magic trick to save myself).

I finished my routine by pulling a bouquet of flowers out of his left ear.
 
Everybody in the room burst out laughing (except the boss), and I then woke up laughing loudly.

OK, all you dream psychologists - what was that all about?

Should I just voluntarily admit myself into a funny farm, or should I bow to the more knowledgable about these matters and ask DD and/or Ascot for some advice?

I won't ask Mugsie, as she will be ROFLAO.

ED

« Last Edit: 2013-Jan-31, 12:37 PM by El Dufus »

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2013-Jan-31, 12:04 PM Reply #34 »
  :lol:

I like the "straight to the funny farm" option myself!   :lol:

Offline Ascot

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« 2013-Feb-03, 09:37 AM Reply #35 »
Hmmmmm.  :chin:  Lot of issue in there ED.

Firstly, dreaming is an open field for the mind so I am disappointed your brain went with something as mundane employment (retirees are allergic to that, for starters) and magic tricks without the pretty assistant being sawed in half.  :wtf: .   This suggests a mental deprivation syndrome popularly known as  "Relevance Deprivation", or simply "sour grapes".  It is known to occur in people who frequent internet forums for nefarious purposes e.g. my good mates Maxthelobbyist  and WillyWhiteshoes.    :biggrin:  But let's not pin that tag on you yet, just be aware of the dangers though.

No I suggest the real psychosis is this....."Too Happy Syndrome".  A mate of mine published this a couple of years back.....Oishi, S., Diener, E., Lucas, R.E. (2007). The Optimum Level of Well-Being: Can People Be Too Happy?. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2(4), 346-360. DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-6916.2007.00048.x  They asked the question "is it possible to be too happy?", and went on to find that an extremely happy person might be less motivated to seek a better job.  There is the clue.......here you are dreaming of working in Qld Treasury   :embarrassed: ....oh the shame.  But it fits.  You are too happy in retirement.  :wacko: . I have the same problem

Now is this serious?  Far from it if you follow the prompts......your brain is telling you to break free of the constraints of retirement and become a magician.  Do it son.  We look forward to a box of tricks on show on Australia Day at the Gold Coast bash  :clap2: .  Note: if you try lifting wallets from people as a trick, just don't open the ones you lift from DD, Vadim or Mono  :stop: .  The Club won't be happy if they have to get pest controllers to deal with the moth infestation in the Directors Lounge afterwards.

Offline Ascot

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« 2013-Feb-05, 09:26 AM Reply #36 »
ED, can you PM me with your address.  I need to invoice you for the above advice.  Will be mates rates as a bulk billing episode and you can claim it back from Medicare.

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Feb-05, 05:37 PM Reply #37 »
I must apologise for being so tardy in responding Ascot, but it has been difficult to find a specialist willing to provide a second opinion.

It's not that they don't want to, but many have said they are very busy with other members of the forum who are suffering from a range of afflictions including:

"slow racehorse" syndrome
"empty wallet" syndrome
"I know all the answers" syndrome (aka "kick RQL to death" syndrome)
"right wing loony" syndrome
"left wing loony" syndrome
"divine right to rule" syndrome (aka "Mr Rabbit" syndrome)
"what the hell is he talking about" syndrome (aka "porky" syndrome)
"racing conspiracy" syndrome, but if you google that, you will be redirected to the "JFC" syndrome site
"pauly" syndrome, but when I googled that one, I got a warning from Interpol that it was a forbidden site

- there were several others, but I suddenly realised that if a dream was the most I had to worry about, then I wasn't in too bad a shape.

I did try to make an appointment with DD's doctor, but the poor thing burst into tears over the phone and said "Not another one, please". I have no idea why his reaction was so disturbing, but it sounded like he needs your advice too!

Please send the account to:

El Dufus
Wolston Park Warm & Fuzzy Medical Facility
Goodna Road
Goodna Qld

Please accept my thanks for your concerns, and I hope I will be allowed out to attend the function on 23rd February at Mugsie's home away from home.

ED




 


Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2013-Feb-05, 07:33 PM Reply #38 »
  :lol:

Sounds like I should hand out little green pills with the name tags on 23rd?      :wub:

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Mar-22, 10:17 AM Reply #39 »
A few years ago, I served on a jury for the first time. It wasn't a pleasant case, which I obviously cannot talk about, but I want to share my experience of the actual selection process.

I'm not sure if our current jury process is "the best", and I know it comes up for discussion every now and then, and I can't offer a real alternative other than make a few minor suggestions below.

For those of you that have never had the opportunity, the process starts with a letter in the post advising that you have been chosen for jury service for a particular period of time, and if you have a valid reason for not serving, to advise within a short period. In previous years when I had received the letter, I had my own business, and could not spare the time, and that was a good enough reason. This time I was in the process of retiring, and I wanted to see how it all worked anyway. I accepted the offer.

Having cleared that hurdle, I then received another letter a short time later telling me to arrive at the Courts at 8am on the date and gather in a particular section of the court building for "mustering". I would be required to make myself available every weekday for two weeks.

There were probably 200-300 people all gathered on the ground floor awaiting further instruction.

A marshall arrived after half an hour and announced that we were required to go through security, and then proceed to an area a few floors above for further instructions.

We all started walking towards security screening, and I noticed a very nervous looking lady beside me . She looked rather distressed, and to calm her down I made conversation with her.

I said "Is this your first time like me?" and to my amazement her reply was "Yes, and they should all be locked up".

I kid you not!

I burst out laughing, much to the chagrine of the marshall and the security person, who gave me an extra check.

I wondered who the poor defendant was going to be who copped this lady on their jury.

Having arrived in the marshalling area upstairs, we were all given a numbered card, and then sat and listened to a person speaking about our responsibilities explaining how the actual empanelling (ie being chosen) process worked. We then watched a video on the court process.

We were all required to attend the courts every week day for a fortnight unless otherwise directed, or until we were chosen for a case by having our number randomly selected. Taking a book was suggested as a way to pass the time. We were told that counselling would be available for anyone who was required to sit on a case and suffered stress or anxiety from evidence presented (particularly in major crimes).

On my third day of attendance, my number was called, and I presented myself to the court, was not "challenged", and subsequently empanelled and took my place in the jury.

I met my fellow jurists for the first time at a morning tea break in the jury room, where we were locked up with a Sheriff stationed outside the door with the key. The jury room was rather small, but comfortable. Refreshments were provided.

We were a mixed lot, from public servants to retirees, from homebodies to business people, from young to old - but thankfully not my lady "friend" from the other day.

I can't talk about our deliberations, but the most interesting part for me was listening to the attitudes of the jury members, which in many instances were totally irrelevant to the evidence being presented.

One older person with a large red nose said "In my day, the problem would have been sorted out the back".

Another said they could not believe the offender could have done this crime as he/she was "such a nice looking and well dressed person".

Another said the defendant's parents looked like a really lovely couple, and had been in court to support their adult child every day, and that should be taken into account.

Our case was not particularly complicated. Evidence was clear, but I have to admit I was disappointed with the debating skills of both the prosecutor's and the defendant's legal teams. They all seemed so young and inexperienced, stumbled over their words a lot, and had difficulty making their points.

I was not expecting a television drama, but was generally disappointed in the quality of the legal teams.

The case lasted a few days, and was very exhausting for all. I have to admit to being very relieved when it was over, and I was glad to escape the closed quarters of the jury room and my fellow colleagues, one of whom took some convincing that hanging was not acceptable in this day and age if the defendant was found guilty! Not quite that bad, but Gawd...................!

Having listened to it all, on later reflection I started wondering how as a group we would have handled a complicated fraud case, or a really nasty murder or similar. I would never classify myself as a particularly clever person (I like a bet, don't I!), but some tax or fraud cases or other major crimes would be really difficult for a lot of people forced into this jury process.

As I said before, I don't have a solution, but I suggest in complicated cases, perhaps there should be a practitioner or at the least someone with relevant experience as part of the jury. I acknowledge that most State jurisdictions don't require a unanimous verdict if a jury is deadlocked these days, and that probably does assist. But I reckon there's got to be some improvements for the more difficult cases.

El D










Offline Ascot

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« 2013-Mar-26, 07:30 AM Reply #40 »
Interesting stuff ED.  Can't wait my turn.  I always thought the Judge took a mentoring role for juries, allbeit sternly and without humour, and pointed out that decisions must get made on evidence alone and not the colour of the bridesmaids dress or the  nazi tattoo on the defendants nose.

I must admit though I have got off the bus early to wait for another when the passenger next to me started sharpening his penknife.  :/ 

Offline Gintara

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« 2013-Mar-26, 10:36 AM Reply #41 »
ED a friend of mine was selected and sat on a murder trial for around six weeks, he made daily updates on Facebook, not specifically on facts but more on the humour and mannerisms of witnesses, it was a pretty funny read as it involved lots of druggies etc who held scant responsibility for the law. Many times they were sent home due to witnesses not turning up  :/

It was pretty easy at the end to work out through the media what the case was.

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Sep-01, 03:33 AM Reply #42 »
Thanks for the dob-in DD!

Yes, Mr & Mrs El Dufus are currently travelling around the western regions of the ol' US of A, in preparation for their son's wedding in Las Vegas in early September. As a stop-off, we visited Los Angeles for a day. LA is a pointless waste of time, where the only thing that interests anyone is celebrity ism. We took a day bus tour around the city and the only thing the guide talked about was where the various movie stars lived and how nice they were to visitors. Saw Beverley Hills, Bel Air etc, and while we were glad to have seen the place, it is not on our places to re-visit.

Flew from LA to San Francisco - now here is a place I could easily stay another week. Absolutely beautiful city, with a harbour to match Sydney. The cable cars are a delight, as is the public transport system generally. The best way to see San Fran is to get a two day tourist bus (Big Red Bus) which will take you everywhere. Saw Alcatraz, crossed the Golden Gate Bridge, and spent time at Fisherman's Wharf which is inundated with sailing people for the America's Cup at the moment.

We are with another couple who have been family friends for over thirty years, and we hired a car to travel from San Francisco to Las Vegas, via Yosemite, Death Valley, Grand Canyon and Monument Valley.

Yosemite is marvellous, although drought stricken at present, so the waterfalls are very dry. The mountain scenery is fabulous, as are the canyons. It is rock climbing heaven, and we saw many intrepid climbers perched on some terrifying ledges on a journey to greater heights. Our guide for the day was a well known rock climber by the name of Ken Boche, whose knowledge of the area was superb. Whilst we only had a day in Yosemite, it will remain a highlight of the tour to date.

Yesterday, we travelled through Death Valley in our hire car. What an experience! One of the most fascinating drives we have taken anywhere. Desert, deep canyons, wonderful but very tiring roads, and temperatures that peaked at 113 degrees. We stopped for lunch in a place called Furnace Creek, and the name is sooo appropriate! The desert features were spectacular, but the outside temperature made it very uncomfortable to spend too much time walking around to tourist spots. It is a must see place for those who like unusual and brilliant scenery.

Today we are in a smallish town North of Las Vegas called Mesquite. It is a new city, mainly based around golf and gambling, and has virtually been carved out of the desert. It boasts 6 championship golf courses, which make an unusual scene because they are so green against the desert background. How they are so well kept in such a dry climate is a mystery to me.

Tomorrow we head off to a town called Page, which is our accommodation point to Monument Valley (lots of spaghetti westerns have been made in Monument Valley!), then on to the the Grand Canyon the day after.

Hope you enjoyed this quick summary, and will try to do a occasional update from time to time.

El D

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2013-Sep-01, 06:51 AM Reply #43 »
Fabulous E.D.   On reading this, I felt as if I were on the tour with you. It sounds like you are having a great time. 

Please have a good look around Grand Canyon for me and take lots of pics.  I was there with 3 Aussie girlfriends when I was 19 but alas, it was AFTER we had spent 4 days in Vegas when, believe it or not, none of us slept the entire time. We went from Show to Show, nightclub to nightclub, party to party!  Alas, on arrival at the Canyon on our way back to L.A. we all checked into a Hotel/Motel there, saw four beds and fell into them comatosed for 15 hours straight!    Never saw a thing before having to board a 'plane the next day to return to L.A.  They tell me it is absolutely fabulous!    :lol:   I have since been back to Vegas 4 times but never back to the Canyon!

Continue to write to us not-so-lucky ones re your trip, take lots of photos (pretend you are Ascot!) and enjoy your son's wedding.  You should have a blast!   ())=( -())=(



   

Offline dubbledee

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« 2013-Sep-01, 10:42 AM Reply #44 »
Thanks for the travelogue, ED.

I know you'll post some pics, too.  :unsu

Offline westie

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« 2013-Sep-01, 08:32 PM Reply #45 »
Mr & Mrs El Dufus
Spot on about Frisco, did you visit Alcatraz or just view from a distance.  Not sure how long you are in the USA but hope you get to see the East Coast. Thanks for the update.

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Sep-02, 02:03 AM Reply #46 »
Another terrific day yesterday, as we drove from Mesquite to Page, although a bit longer than expected. Unusually, this area, despite being desert, has had above average rainfall in certain parts. Some parts of Arizona have had floods, yet others are still very dry. We saw both, and the result of rainfall has been akin to rain in our outback.

At one stage during the drive, we came over a rise to be confronted by a desert valley of green which seemed to stretch forever. It was a photo opportunity not be missed, but I don't think our photo will give sufficient depth and contrast to show the splendour. So on one side of a mountain was dry desert, and on the other was green pasture - unbelievably beautiful.

Our journey to Page was extended as our road had suffered flood damage, and the detour put us over an hour late in reaching our destination. And when we arrived, we discovered that Monument Valley was still a further three hours away. So,we have made a management decision to miss the valley, and spend today in Navaho territory exploring more of the intriguing countryside. Page sits on a very large lake (Lake Powell), and the rivers that fill the lake meander through canyons of beauty, so a boat trip is today's plan now.

Tomorrow is the Grand Canyon, and then to Las Vegas for a week.

El D.

Offline Racehorses

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« 2013-Sep-02, 10:17 AM Reply #47 »
ED, have lots of fun and enjoy  -())=( :yes:

Offline Goldie Locks

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« 2013-Sep-02, 10:26 AM Reply #48 »
El D.................don't miss the Dancing Waters outside the Bellagio Hotel in Vegas.  Sooooooooooooo romantic late at night!  Bellagio one of my favourite Hotels!    emthup

Offline El Dufus

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« 2013-Sep-03, 01:39 PM Reply #49 »
Thanks for the good wishes.

To answer a couple of queries - I wouldn't know how to upload a photo to save myself DD. Westie, we tried to get to Alcatraz, but the visits were booked out 10 days in advance, and we couldn't get a ticket for our short stay, so we just took the boat cruise around it.

Now for an update, yesterday we took a boat cruise on Lake Powell, which is near the town of Page, where we were staying. We thought it was a small lake until we learnt that it's basin is bigger than Sydney Harbour, and we explored a tiny little part. It is a major resort area, with many million dollar boats moored at the marina, including one with helicopter. Now this is Arizona, which is desert country, so to see and travel on this enormous water basin situated in deep canyons is just incongruous in the extreme.  The lake's water is supplied about 90% from snow melt from the Rockies, and they have had two dry seasons, so the lake is about 150 feet below its highest point. The depth of the lake is 420 feet on average, so you can imagine the volume of water it holds.

After seeing this phenomenon, we decided we would take the long drive to Monument Valley after all. It took us a good two hours to arrive, and we were so happy we made the effort - it is spectacular! The name comes from the shapes of the rock formations, which thrust into the air to great heights and in different formations (they are called sandstone butts). Anyone who has seen an American cowboy movie will have seen Monument Valley, and anyone old enough to remember John Wayne will also recognise the area.

We were so glad we made the trip, although I had to drive back into the western sun.

Today we travelled to the Grand Canyon. Words cannot describe this unbelievable destination. The size and depth of the canyon takes the breath away. It is a mile (1500 m) deep, and you can virtually stand on the edge and look down to the bottom. Occupational Health & Safety would have a field day, as there are very few safety railings, and I think the authorities give individuals the common sense to not take too many risks. Certainly we did not stand too close to the edges.

We spent a magnificent couple of hours taking in the splendour, including a delightful lunch looking out over the canyon. The main hotel on the south rim of the canyon charges around $400 a night for a fairly modest room (but steeped in history), so we declined the offer!

We are due in Las Vegas tomorrow, so we drove an hour or so from the canyon to a very ordinary motel on the famous Route 66, which has featured in movies and songs forever. Funnily enough, there was a photo shoot right outside the motel when we arrived, where a very well endowed model was strutting her stuff. Lots of 60's memorabilia in the Main Street, so a bit of reminiscing was in order!

That's all for today. Next update from Las Vegas in a couple of days.

El D



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