Follow JWH -the Tweet-Twitter Alternative - Blogs - Racehorse TALK harm-plan

Racehorse TALK



Follow JWH -the Tweet-Twitter Alternative - Blogs - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Follow JWH -the Tweet-Twitter Alternative  (Read 86240 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Mar-17, 12:48 PM Reply #475 »
Ring ring

EFK "EFK here"

DA "David Attenborough"

EFK "David, how are you? Still protecting those endangered species?"

DA "I'm talking to an endangered species now."

EFK "What are you talking about?"

DA "About the laundering that was going on here under your stewardship."

EFK "The only laundering that I know of was when I assigned P1 or P2 to fetch my shirts on Friday afternoons."

DA "That's bullshit. We've just been pinged $45 million because of your hanky-panky. What do you say to that?"

EFK "HELLO DAVID, HELLO. I can't hear you. The satellite connection must be breaking up." 
       CLUNK

DA  "Grrrr.



Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Apr-02, 10:35 AM Reply #476 »





The 75-year-old received his award during a private event in Stockholm before a scheduled concert in the city.

Klas Ostergren, a member of the Swedish Academy, said the ceremony was a small, intimate event in line with the singer's wishes, with just academy members and a member of Dylan's staff attending.

"It went very well indeed," he said, describing Dylan as "a very nice, kind man".

Other members of the academy told Swedish media Dylan seemed pleased by the award.

During his show hours later, Dylan made no reference to the Nobel award, simply performing a set blending old classics with tunes from his more recent albums.

Dylan had declined the invitation to attend the traditional Nobel Prize banquet and ceremony on December 10, 2016 — the date of Alfred Nobel's death — pleading other commitments.
But in order to receive the award worth $1,172,585, Dylan must give a lecture within six months from December 10.

Dylan had said he would not give his Nobel lecture this weekend, but a recorded version of it would be sent later.

Taped Nobel lectures have occasionally been presented, most recently in 2013 by Canadian Nobel literature laureate Alice Munro.

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded to Dylan "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition".

He had expressed awe at receiving the Nobel Prize and thanked the Swedish Academy for including him among the "giants" of writing.


Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-May-24, 04:38 PM Reply #477 »
 :hbd:

Bob

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Jun-06, 09:19 PM Reply #478 »



  :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:   :noteworthy:

Offline Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 30555
« 2017-Jun-07, 02:35 AM Reply #479 »
Good timing ?

Offline Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 30555
« 2017-Jun-07, 02:37 AM Reply #480 »

Bob Dylan finally delivers Nobel Prize lecture, mere days ahead of deadline

Rob Moran

Published: June 6 2017 - 10:04PM

If he missed the cut-off, he wouldn't get his $1.2 million prizemoney.

Even Nobel Prize winners are procrastinators, it seems.

Musician Bob Dylan has finally delivered his Nobel lecture, a prerequisite for the award's accompanying prizemoney, almost eight months after he was controversially awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in October.  

The singer had been granted six months from December 10, the date of the Nobel Prize ceremony, to deliver his lecture in order to receive the 8 million krona ($1.2 million) prizemoney.

He made the deadline with just days to spare.

In the 30-minute address, reportedly sent to the Nobel Prize academy via audio link, Dylan waxes poetic on the connection between his song lyrics – "folk lingo, the only vocabulary I knew" – and classic literature, as jazzy piano chords play in the background.

In a pronounced laconic drawl that online commenters have compared to late comedian Mitch Hedberg, the musician discusses his early admiration of Buddy Holly and black blues and folk music, before breaking down the formative novels he read in grammar school – Moby DickAll Quiet On The Western Front, and The Odyssey – whose themes, he says, later informed his music.

"If a song moves you, that's all that's important," he says in the speech. "I've written all kinds of things into my songs. And I'm not going to worry about it – what it all means."

Dylan's enthusiastic English tutorial was praised by the Swedish academy's permanent secretary Sara Danius, who called the speech "extraordinary and, as one might expect, eloquent," in a blog post.

"Now that the lecture has been delivered, the Dylan adventure is coming to a close," she wrote.

And perhaps not too soon, the added subtext might imply, as the musician ruffled feathers over the lengthy course of his Nobel-winning saga.

As well as backlash over Dylan's own nonchalance over the prize – he refused to acknowledge the honour for weeks after his win, before announcing he would miss the December 10 ceremony, where the winner traditionally delivers their lecture, due to "pre-existing commitments" – the academy's initial announcement was met with criticism from author types, including Irvine Welsh and Gary Shteyngart, who thought the prize should've been awarded to a deserving novelist rather than a songwriter.

Dylan seemed to respond to those criticisms in his speech's closing stanza, saying "songs are unlike literature."

"The words in Shakespeare's plays were meant to be acted on the stage. Just as lyrics in songs are meant to be sung, not read on a page," he said.

"I hope some of you get the chance to listen to these lyrics the way they were intended to be heard: in concert or on record or however people are listening to songs these days." 


Offline Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 30555
« 2017-Jun-07, 02:41 AM Reply #481 »
  • The Times

Bob Dylan has delivered a lecture to qualify for the cash reward that comes with the Nobel prize for literature, months after the singer-songwriter was named the winner at a ceremony he declined to attend.

“When I received the Nobel prize for literature, I got to wondering exactly how my songs related to literature,” Dylan, 76, said in a recorded 26-minute address.

“I wanted to reflect on it and see where the connection was. I’m gonna try and articulate it to you — and most likely it will go in a roundabout way.”

He does not disappoint, offering freewheeling summaries of three books that he said were special influences — Moby-DickAll Quiet on the Western Front and The Odyssey.

Of Moby-Dick, he wrote: “We see only the surface of things. We can interpret what lies below any way we see fit. Crewmen walk around on deck listening for mermaids, and sharks and vultures follow the ship. Reading skulls and faces like you read a book. Here’s a face. I’ll put it in front of you. Read it if you can.”

He also highlighted the influence of Buddy Holly and Huddie William Ledbetter, the American folk and blues musician known as Lead Belly.

In a warm, raspy delivery, with lounge-style piano in the background, he called Buddy Holly his first musical hero, praised his “imaginative verses” and remembered seeing him in concert not long before Holly died in a 1959 plane crash.

“Something about him seemed permanent and he filled me with conviction,” Dylan said of seeing Holly on stage. “Then out of the blue, the most uncanny thing happened, he looked at me right straight there in the eye and he transmitted something, something I didn’t know what. It gave me the chills.”

Dylan’s relationship with the Swedish Academy, which awards Nobel prizes, has been testy. He irked some academy members by failing to comment for weeks after he was named the winner. He declined to attend the ceremony in December, opting instead to collect the award privately later. To qualify for the £715,000 ($1.2m) cash prize he had to deliver a lecture by June 10.

He ended his lecture with what seems like a teasing jab at the academy. “Songs are unlike literature,” he said. “They’re meant to be sung, not read ... I hope some of you get the chance to listen to these lyrics the way they were intended to be heard: in concert or on record or however people are listening to songs these days. I return once again to Homer, who says: ‘Sing in me, oh Muse, and through me tell the story.’ ”

The Times


Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7033
« 2017-Jun-23, 01:08 PM Reply #482 »
I have just come across this blog,does anyone read this rubbish ?

Offline mortdale

  • Listed
  • User 2513
  • Posts: 444
« 2017-Jun-23, 01:40 PM Reply #483 »
.
« Last Edit: 2017-Jun-25, 09:31 AM by mortdale »

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Jun-23, 01:47 PM Reply #484 »
 Mort

I'm not exactly sure how long you've been around here but this rubbish of mine has been around  about seven years.

The site is called "Racehorse Talk" but it, and its predecessor, has always been more than just race talk. 

Offline mortdale

  • Listed
  • User 2513
  • Posts: 444
« 2017-Jun-23, 02:41 PM Reply #485 »
.
« Last Edit: 2017-Jun-25, 09:30 AM by mortdale »

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Jun-23, 03:29 PM Reply #486 »
Mort

If you take a couple of minutes to think it might twig that I was lampooning ( or trying to) social media and some people's obsession with letting all and sundry know everything about themselves.

If the subject of those early posts didn't  ring a bell then surely the name of this thread should have given a clue.

Anyway, there's no compulsion on anyone to read anything.

Offline mortdale

  • Listed
  • User 2513
  • Posts: 444
« 2017-Jun-25, 09:40 AM Reply #487 »
Mort

If you take a couple of minutes to think it might twig that I was lampooning ( or trying to) social media and some people's obsession with letting all and sundry know everything about themselves.

If the subject of those early posts didn't  ring a bell then surely the name of this thread should have given a clue.

Anyway, there's no compulsion on anyone to read anything.

JWH, I read your response in depth and I need to apologize as I now see that you were only taking the "micky" out of the modern day blogger with their over zealous need to tell everyone of their movements 24/7.

Yesterday I took my 3 nephews out to the movies and then lunch. All through lunch they were taking pictures and sending to their friends with every detail of their food etc.

I said, "turn those phone offs we are having a family lunch". You would have thought I had broken their legs.

JWH, I can see your early blogs were written out of frustration just like my actions yesterday.

Have a good Sunday.

 :clap2:

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Sep-03, 11:45 AM Reply #488 »
I've just noticed that the prospective new star of the turf is Vega Magic and the granny of the currently undisputed champion of the turf, Winx, is the similarly named, yet unrelated (as far as I know, Auth to advise) Vegas Magic.

Well, it's interesting to me.

Offline sobig

  • Group 2
  • User 583
  • Posts: 3238
« 2017-Sep-03, 02:17 PM Reply #489 »
Definitely no relation there jwh.

The name Vegas Magic comes from her grand dam Vegas whereas Vega Magic's name comes from her sire Lope de Vega,

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Sep-03, 02:54 PM Reply #490 »
So I know that Sobig :beer: but Auth likes going back into the dim dark ages to show that there was a common ancestor.

So I wanted to qualify what I wrote.

Offline Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 30555
« 2017-Sep-05, 04:03 AM Reply #491 »
I shall look into it later.


Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Sep-14, 02:50 PM Reply #492 »
I notice an opinion piece by Elmer Funke Kupper in the Financial Review has his credentials noted as "a private investor.  He was previous chief executive of ASX and director of the Business Council of Australia."

Seems he has expunged his gig at TABCORP from his CV.

I wonder why. :chin:

Remember those rollicking good times, right here on this very thread, when EFK, our erstwhile mate praiseworthy,(aka P1) and our current mate philby42 (aka P2) and EFK's PA Marge used to have the times of their lives with all of us being privy to all the activities?

I might just go back to the start of this thread and re-live those times when I can spare a few hours or so. :bulb:

More later



 
« Last Edit: 2017-Sep-16, 06:22 PM by JWesleyHarding »

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Oct-21, 03:57 PM Reply #493 »
Seems to me that the Caulfield Cup winner was bred for 7 furlongs rather than 1 1/2 miles of a hot pace. 

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Oct-23, 07:48 PM Reply #494 »

Online JWesleyHarding

  • Group 1
  • User 231
  • Posts: 17238
« 2017-Nov-11, 11:05 AM Reply #495 »
For the life of me I can't work out why today's 10f Emirates Group 1  is worth twice the Darley 6f Group 1 race  :what:

Offline Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 30555
« 2017-Nov-12, 08:56 AM Reply #496 »
One day, in the not too distant future, it will take over from the Cox Plate as Australia's premier race.

Offline PoisonPen7

  • Group 1
  • User 55
  • Posts: 18102
« 2017-Nov-12, 09:20 AM Reply #497 »
One day, in the not too distant future, it will take over from the Cox Plate as Australia's premier race.

The problem with that is that they are "watering the beer".

In a space of 5 weeks, you have the Turnbull, the Caulfield Stks, the Cox Plate and the McKinnon, interspersed with races like the Underwood (1800m) and the Makybe Diva (1600m) - all Group 1.

You cannot sustain the same quality across all races. The consistent Happy Clapper was beaten 1.5 lengths in the Emirates, and 6.55 lengths in the Cox Plate - sort of accentuates the point.

Offline PoisonPen7

  • Group 1
  • User 55
  • Posts: 18102
« 2017-Nov-12, 09:28 AM Reply #498 »
...lest I be seen as being negative, what I'd like to see the VRC do is to leave the Emirates where it is, and ramp up the Darley to 3 or 4 million. Look at the field it attracted yesterday.

In future years, I could envisage the international stables sending out teams that include stayers and sprinters, where the sprinters could run in the Everest- Darley double.

Would be a great feature of the whole carnival in general, and in particular the final day which sometimes can be a bit of an anti-climax.


BACK TO ALL TOPICS
Sitemap