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Offline monologue

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« 2011-Mar-01, 07:39 PM Reply #50 »
Yes great news in relation to Malcolm's appointment as CEO of the Lions.

Through my association with vadim ( as a mate) I got to meet Malcolm on many occassions and he was a delightful person to talk too.
He would always come up to our table and have a chat on racedays and on the odd oaccassion invited us into the CR for a drink.

He was the one that gave us blokes from the Bay a title that has stuck and we still use it frequently today, in fact we have a successful punters club account with the name he bestowed upon us.

If only some others in positions like his were a bit more friendly the world of clubs may be in a better state than they are in now.

All the best Malcolm and hope we can catch up with you at the track some time in the future. 8-)

Offline Walter Watermelon

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« 2011-Mar-01, 08:19 PM Reply #51 »
He might have the credentials off the field but is he handy at full forward?

Online arthur

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« 2011-Mar-02, 12:40 PM Reply #52 »
He'd be a bit out of place there if he was . . . might make a good coach/talent scout though  :chin:  :chin:

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-02, 02:44 PM Reply #53 »
Malcolm Holmes was CEO of the Hurricanes Rugby Union Club.  He has a ton of experience in sporting organisations and in regards to AFL he understands the market, the environment and the culture.  Not everything that contributes to the success of a footy club happens on the field, and he has all the skills to make sure everything is tickety boo after the siren on Sat and until it blows again a week later.  He did a great job for NZ racing and I am confident he will get the Lions organisation roaring. 

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-04, 09:50 AM Reply #54 »
Back to Health, the CM reports some alarming data on wait times in the QH public system.

 http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/five-year-wait-for-queensland-patients-just-to-get-on-the-surgery-waiting-list/story-e6freoof-1226015609908

The cause?  Underfunding and too many freeloaders perhaps.

Offline monologue

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« 2011-Mar-04, 11:07 AM Reply #55 »
I and the wife opted out of private health insurance years ago.

We decided and have done so for years to deposit our usual health insurance fees into an interest bearing deposit account.
Over the years we have built up a healthy bank for possible future surgery.

Well I'm booked in for minor surgery which requires 1 day and night in hospital with an early release the next day, all going well.

After deciding not to wait up to 12 months for a spot in the public system I booked myself into a private hospital.

This morning I received my quote for the procedure.
As an interest I'll put some details up so people can see just how expensive private health care is.

Amount due to Specialist $1,706

Hospital Fees- Theatre $1,706..One night accommodation -$817.00 Pharmacy $40.00
Total $2,563 payable to ......Hospital

Anaesthetic Fee...An estimate of cost will be forwarded to you by your Anaesthetist.

For post op care  I had to buy a surgical stocking to wear while the leg heals at a cost of $140.00 and must bring it with me .

Now I can afford to pay as we have been fortunate to save a bit in readiness for these type of things that will surface as we get older.

I'm grateful I can afford to pay for the swiftness of the service but unfortunately there are many out there that can't afford to pay for early treatment and this is where something needs to be done. 

According to the report in to days; CM the waiting list in public hospitals have been cut substantially but many on these long waiting list may beg to differ with that quote.

I'm not smart enough to toss in any suggestions as to how the public system could be fixed but something definitely needs to be done because there are just too many genuine people out there including the battlers( aren't we all battlers these days) that can't afford private health care.

Don't forget that most of these people waiting on public health systems have indeed contributed all of their working lives with taxes paid into the coffers of the various government departments, and I believe they are entitled to good health and good health care in their old age.

Let the pollies give up their over generous handouts and freebies ,perks and such when their political careers are over and save the public purse strings for things more important like good affordable health care.

Offline winner

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« 2011-Mar-04, 12:02 PM Reply #56 »
Monologue even if you go through the "private" system (without cover) you are still entitled to claim back certain things via medicare. Would be interesting to know how much of the private bill they will cover.

Offline monologue

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« 2011-Mar-04, 12:07 PM Reply #57 »
Thanks Winner

Medicare refund approximately $425.00...that's for fee to specialist, no refund shown for any other fees.

Offline dubbledee

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« 2011-Mar-04, 12:10 PM Reply #58 »
It's the hospital side of things that can send us broke.

Mono's only having his tubes tied, so not gonna be a big-ticket item. :nowink:

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-04, 12:32 PM Reply #59 »
Mono

Well done for putting up some true costs.  At least it kills the optimistic expectation of some that banking rather than spending money on insurance premiums is the way to go.  Wait until you have a long stay in a private hospital for abdo or orthopaedic surgery.  That is as much a gamble as taking out health insurance.   It is true that some people will never see a hospital in their lives and might rightly see insurance as a waste of money.  It is also true that some people will have an illness that could bankrupt them.   But on average a typical over 60 patient could reasonably expect (before they die) to need an opthalmologist for cataracts or retinal disease, a gastroenterologist for for colonoscopy, gastroscopy investigations or fatty liver disease (thats if you have had a beer or two a day since you were an adult), a cardiologist for coronary artery disease, a dermatologist for resection of BCC or SCC lesions (no one used sunscreen when I was a teenager), an orthopaedic specialist for spine degeneration disease, knee and hip problems, a rheumatologist for joint diseases, a vascular physician for any number of circulation problems like varicose veins, a respiratory physician for emphysema (we all smoked, remember).  And those are only run of the mill illnesses that occur "naturally" and progressively with ageing.

Tack onto that unexpected illnesses any of us might encounter including as stroke, heart attack, cancer, diabetes, MVA's,.....get the picture.   My shout next beer if you can find someone on this forum who has not seen themselves, a relative or a mate who has not had a serve of at least one of the above.

I return to my original point that if you can afford it, private insurance should be a priority in our society.  I say that simply because the evidence is that you will eventually need it or wish you had it.  They had a bloke on ABC radio today who had a need for a colonoscopy.  His wait time so far has been two years and he still has no visible appointment.  I can ring up a gastroenterologist and get one done privately next week.  Why the difference?  I suggest there are too many people using the public system.  Are there that many genuine welfare cases about?  I doubt it.  There is no such thing as a free lunch and similarly there is no such thing a free health care...someone has to pay.  

Maybe the immediate solution is to means test the patient to bring the genuine welfare cases to the front of the queue.  I could live with that.  At the moment in the public system the millionaire gets the same rating as the poverty case........whoever got in the door first gets seen first.

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-04, 12:35 PM Reply #60 »
Doesn't hurt Mono, just have some frozen peas in the fridge in case the jewels swell.

Bit worried about you shelling out that much for a pair of tights.  DD pays nothing like that.

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-05, 01:18 PM Reply #61 »
Even Paul Lucas agrees with me about supply and demand, and the ageing problem.  What he won't admit, but I know he thinks, is that access to public health care should not be 100% free for everyone.  Ultimately, access to the freebies has to be means tested.  We simply, as taxpayers, cannot afford to subsidise it 100% and the very people it is intended to be there for can't access it because of the freeloaders.


http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/paul-lucas-turns-hospital-waiting-list-blame-back-on-ageing-population/story-e6freoof-1226016143155



Offline Authorized

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« 2011-Mar-05, 01:29 PM Reply #62 »
As far as I know it is not 100% free to any tax payer.

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-05, 04:50 PM Reply #63 »
Matt

In Qld it is 100%free.  All they want to know is your medicare number and they cost shift what they can, the rest is free....no gap payment required.  The thing is a holy cow tenant left over from the 1950's when the Golden Casket Lottery system was introduced.  Joh campaiged on it all his life....very popular with the voters is free health care for all.  All profits from the lottery went to Health Dept to run the hospitals.  In those days there were no casinos, pokies or TAB so if you wanted to be a gambler you had to go to a racetrack, find an SP or buy a lottery ticket.  So they had a pretty captive audience and the system worked.   I think NSW established a Lottery system of similar style except they directed profits to build the Sydney Opera House.  Trouble is they privatised gambling and those profits now go elsewhere.

So anyone can walk in off the street and get a Liver Transplant (provided you need one, of course) that costs the taxpayer about $500K all up, no questions asked. 

Offline Authorized

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« 2011-Mar-05, 04:59 PM Reply #64 »
Don't tax payers pay 1% income tax towards Medicare ?

Offline sobig

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« 2011-Mar-05, 05:17 PM Reply #65 »
Don't tax payers pay 1% income tax towards Medicare ?

And higher income earners who do not have private insurance pay a surcharge.


Offline Walter Watermelon

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« 2011-Mar-05, 05:48 PM Reply #66 »
So anyone can walk in off the street and get a Liver Transplant (provided you need one, of course) that costs the taxpayer about $500K all up, no questions asked. 

I'll do it for $250k. No personal cheques accepted.

No questions asked. :x:

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-07, 07:21 AM Reply #67 »
Mat

Medicare levy does not normally fund the cost of hospitals.  Govt Health Depts can offset some of the cost of you seeing a doctor in a hospital by bulk billing to medicare but that component of the cost of your visit is relatively small.   But the money goes (albeit by a devious path) to the doctor not the hospital.  You can also cost shift back to Medicare some pathology and radiology services but the amounts are also minor.  Hospitals are funded by Federal grants through the so called Medicare Agreement but don't confuse that with how the levy you pay is used.  The new Fed health system shifts the chairs around a bit in terms of efficiency of use of funding but does not alter the fact that the system is not funded to deliver "free" health care to anyone who expects it........hence the logjam in getting access to it.


Sobig

The surcharge is a disincentive for those who could afford private insurance but choose to freeload on the public system.  Yes it raises money, but nowhere near the sums that would compensate the cost of them opting out.

But the more important point is that healthcare cannot be free for everyone......it is an illusion.  So what happens is you get long wait times that continue to increase and a slow decline in quality of the system.  The solution to that is to raise taxes to expand the system or means test access to send the freeloaders to the private system.   The most important thing is that the public system is there for those that really need it, not just so anyone who likes a freebie can take it.


Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-08, 05:05 PM Reply #68 »
History Chapter 1
The 1950's

Norton has been a Brissie boy all his life  8-) .  North of the river, of course.  The mob on the southside  :/ may as well have been in Tasmania.  I can remember the 1950's in Brisbane but only vaguely.   Dirt roads in 'burbs, timber outhouse up the backyard, louvre windows so regularly smashed by a cricket ball  :embarrassed: we kept spares in the laundry.  Clothes were hand washed in a copper with Sunlight Soap or Rinso.   The "spin dryer" was a set of rubber coated rollers moved by a handle.  No Hills hoist, just wire strung between two posts that looked like crucifixes and the wire was held up in the middle by a timber prop.  Trains were red rattler carriages with puffing billy steam engines.  Open trams with drop centre boards the only restraint from getting out on the wrong side.  Dinosaur busses that went to low gear to get up hills, and occasionally a few passengers had to get off halfway up so the bus could reach the top.

Holidays were at the grand parents family shack at Cribb Island (now the  runway at Brisbane Airport), Surfers Paradise or Kirra/ Coolangatta.  Pies at Yatala once a year.  The pie shop is still there today and I never fail to stop and have one when going to the Coast  :p .

Have never missed a Brisbane Ekka except on three occasions when working in the USA or UK.  Cracker night with a roaring bonfire in the backyard.  And someone always tried to blow up the dunny or the letterbox  :blush: .

We were tough back then....none of this woossy pre school or kindy stuff. Just Sunday school with the presbos down at Redcliffe then off to Grade 1 with the Good Samaritan Sisters at Enoggera  :rolleyes: .  Mother Superior was stylised by the nun in the Blues Brothers movie, and we would come home with the bruises on hands and buttocks from the bashings to prove it.  They really loved discipline, the ruler and the cane.......probably explains why I know how to behave myself when I have to. 

Mass on Sunday preceeded by a morning fast, Confession Saturday night.  No meat on Fridays.   Regular Novenas and always the Rosary chanted at night.  We starved on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday  :shutup: .  And we scammed for Plenary Indulgences.....a promise that Jesus would give you a tip the end was nigh  :wavecry: so you could do a quick repent with the last breath and bypass St Peter for the members enclosure in Heaven  :bop: (that is the bit over the wall and away from the prods). Have mine in credit so I can still safely  play up.  Even if St Peter tripped you on a technicality (e.g. using an expired ticket) you only went to Purgatory for a bit just to get a feel of the heat from the fires of Hell (no need to weep and gnash the teeth) and be grateful you were good at least some of the time.  You could cash in indulgences to erase accumulated Purgatory fines for mortal sins.  I never did cash any on, so I intend to die in a thermal suit, just so it will be tolerable.  I feel sad for the prods because Martin Luther proclaimed the indulgence stuff was a con, and they believed him....poor buggars.

We walked to school, listened to Superman, Hop Harrigan, Whats That, Dad & Dave, Argonauts etc on the radio after school and into the evening.  Bath was run once and first in got the best of it, was bit dodgy by the fourth kid through  :sweat: .  Trips to the dunny after dark was by candle and we wiped our bums with newspaper.  If someone got sick  :sick: with the vomits, runs, lumps or rash we all got it, and the GP did housecalls to inject you with a gallon of penicillin from a syringe the size of a Volkswagon.  Bread was delivered to the door, often still hot, by the baker in the mornings.  Ditto full cream  milk with the collar of cream at the neck of the bottle.  Lawn was always green because it always rained somtime during the week, and bindii seemed to be confined to a few patches we all learned to avoid.  Lawn got cut with a push mover and we raked the clippings.

Gee life was good  :no1: .  Dad worked, mum housekept, they stayed married their whole adult lives, and the 4 kids lived the life of Reilly.  And people smoked cigarettes, even on the bus, train and tram.



Offline Norton

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« 2011-Mar-15, 05:00 PM Reply #69 »
Saw these on Facebook today.  Have mates who are doing a clinical rotation at a rural Qld hospital.  Thought I might share some of their more "amusing" moments from this week:

1.   Consulted morbidly o/wt man on ward round with large "fxxx off we're full" tattoo. On handover nurse mentioned he stipulated Australian doctors only. We rocked up with 4 of 6 team members ethnic.

2.  Consulted a guy with a swastika tattoo today.  He had a mullet and pretty sure it was a prison tattoo... all inky and thin.

3.   Had to suture a drunk that got glassed last night. Spent the entire consult telling me to fxxx off so he could "rxxt the german bitch" (read: Senior House Officer) that was supervising me, or failing that get back to the pub 

Good solid citizens enjoying the benefits of Queenslands free public hospitals system.    emthup

And Andrew Fraser said this week that our doctors are overpaid.
« Last Edit: 2011-Apr-03, 05:38 PM by Norton »

Offline chuggers

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« 2011-Apr-03, 07:29 PM Reply #70 »
Saw these on Facebook today.  Have mates who are doing a clinical rotation at a rural Qld hospital.  Thought I might share some of their more "amusing" moments from this week:

1.   Consulted morbidly o/wt man on ward round with large "fxxx off we're full" tattoo. On handover nurse mentioned he stipulated Australian doctors only. We rocked up with 4 of 6 team members ethnic.

2.  Consulted a guy with a swastika tattoo today.  He had a mullet and pretty sure it was a prison tattoo... all inky and thin.

3.   Had to suture a drunk that got glassed last night. Spent the entire consult telling me to fxxx off so he could "rxxt the german bitch" (read: Senior House Officer) that was supervising me, or failing that get back to the pub 

Good solid citizens enjoying the benefits of Queenslands free public hospitals system.     emthup  

And Andrew Fraser said this week that our doctors are overpaid.


Yes--every one of them are angels---my latest experience is all good---just luck I suppose--had a large cist under my arm that need to be lanced---go to Wollongong Hospital at 11am on Saturday--no one in emergency--could not believe it---they did what they had to do--very painful--but the job was done---then had to go back every few days for a repackage--on the first revisit--the nurse in the hospital says---do you really want--to wait with the ferals in waiting room for this--I can give you a week off and get the local community nurse to visit you--well thanks---and a week on the punt---won over a $1000.

Great people.

Life is always good.

 8-)


Offline Norton

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« 2011-Apr-04, 04:25 PM Reply #71 »
Thanks for the tips.

Offline Authorized

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« 2011-Apr-04, 04:40 PM Reply #72 »
Saw these on Facebook today.  Have mates who are doing a clinical rotation at a rural Qld hospital.  Thought I might share some of their more "amusing" moments from this week:

1.   Consulted morbidly o/wt man on ward round with large "fxxx off we're full" tattoo. On handover nurse mentioned he stipulated Australian doctors only. We rocked up with 4 of 6 team members ethnic.

2.  Consulted a guy with a swastika tattoo today.  He had a mullet and pretty sure it was a prison tattoo... all inky and thin.

3.   Had to suture a drunk that got glassed last night. Spent the entire consult telling me to fxxx off so he could "rxxt the german bitch" (read: Senior House Officer) that was supervising me, or failing that get back to the pub 

Good solid citizens enjoying the benefits of Queenslands free public hospitals system.     emthup  

And Andrew Fraser said this week that our doctors are overpaid.


The big GREEN stuff needle should be free and freely used by doctors.

Tell me what good are these people to the over all good of the human species ?


Offline Norton

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« 2011-Apr-04, 06:44 PM Reply #73 »
Well it takes all types to make a society.

Offline Norton

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« 2011-Apr-08, 09:48 AM Reply #74 »
There is an article in the latest New England Journal of Medicine that might give some a different perspective into the Gulf Oil Spill off the US last year.  It is a bit different to the mainstream media reporting and informative to boot.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMra1007197


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