2018 The Kosciuszko - World's Richest Country Race - N.S.W Gallops - Racehorse TALK
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2018 The Kosciuszko - World's Richest Country Race - N.S.W Gallops - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: 2018 The Kosciuszko - World's Richest Country Race  (Read 9398 times)

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Offline Gintara

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« 2018-Oct-15, 12:28 PM Reply #50 »

Neither me nor you -- until we are told

....and we wont be told the accountable truth.

If some 200,000 tickets were sold , it is most likely that rural race clubs bought most - 'on behalf of their members'.

The average punter may be old but is not silly -- some may have bought a couple but would wish they had not.

This tripe about ticket funding will not be repeated if there is any audited accountability for 'who bought what'.

So Pete I take it you're calling RNSW, V'Landy's et al liars?  :chin:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-15, 01:11 PM Reply #51 »


Never !

Like Sargeant Friday -- I just want the facts ma'am, just the facts.

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-15, 07:21 PM Reply #52 »

No one is telling us this

No wonder the media are so beholden to the party line from Druitt Street.


Sydneyís commercial media outlets are among the biggest winners from Saturdayís Everest race meeting. In the weeks leading up to the race, three advertisers spent almost $900,000 on print, radio and television ads.

Marketing and media firm Ebiquity put the spend by betting agency TAB, the Australian Turf Club, and the Australian Jockey Club at $867,000, mostly in Sydney media, with much smaller spends in Brisbane and Melbourne, and smaller again in Adelaide and Perth.

The Sydney Morning Herald had almost daily ads, including four front and back page ads, in the two weeks leading up to the race. The Herald and The Daily Telegraph both carried wrap-arounds and lift-outs dedicated to detailed coverage of the race.

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jun-30, 08:32 PM Reply #53 »


Racing up the mountains again -- queues of climbers for Kosciusko

For an industry that claims a preoccupation with 'integrity' it will be interesting to see how open and transparent is the coming media hype about the 'success' of these contrived events.

There was not much candor in the hyped-up nonsense that paraded as media reporting last year.

Journalists were apparently pressured into toeing the line.

I consider it disturbing that industry promotion of the Kosciusko is extolling the 'excitement' of a completely unexpected result last year when the F4 paid some$100K.

Rough races like the Kosciusko are invitations for 'old smokeys'  to finish on top.

Even sensible connections would be wary of getting involved in a game they cannot understand.

The incredulity extends to inviting 'punters' to buy tickets so they may 'win' a horse before they negotiate with connections about how the spoils will be shared.

I invite explanations from individual punters as to why they would buy a ticket.

I similarly invite explanations from rural race clubs as to why they would use members money to buy tickets.





Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Jun-30, 08:46 PM Reply #54 »
Iíll be buying $20 or $50 with

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Jun-30, 11:03 PM Reply #55 »
What you fail to mention Pete was the race was run on a bog track, pretty much put the favorite out of play.

Sort of negates your diatribe  :whistle:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jul-01, 09:42 AM Reply #56 »

Transparency or hype-tripe

The issue on the table is not the winner or track-rating of a particular event -- rather it is about the dare-to-be-great (and quickly) approach to racing administration.

Those interested can scroll back through this thread and be reminded of the spiritual gymnastics involved in presenting the mountain races as just what the punters wanted to bring them back to the track.

In the pay-back stakes RVL kicked an own goal with its all-stars crashing to earth

It was not and the new seasons plays are unfolding.

The racing segment on 2KSKY this morning started with a marketing message blandly encouraging punters to buy 'Kosciuszko tickets'.

------- we await any credible case being made for any punter to buy such a ticket.

[The game only got even sillier this morning with the plan for a new bet on odd or even numbered winners -- a concept to rival the quickly  discarded 'spinner' bet from the early 2000s and the raft of other duets and trios and mystery bet options that mock the industry and punters.]


Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Jul-01, 07:50 PM Reply #57 »


Transparency or hype-tripe

The issue on the table is not the winner or track-rating of a particular event -- rather it is about the dare-to-be-great (and quickly) approach to racing administration.

Those interested can scroll back through this thread and be reminded of the spiritual gymnastics involved in presenting the mountain races as just what the punters wanted to bring them back to the track.





Rubbish!

You obviously don't even remember what you wrote  :shutup:




I consider it disturbing that industry promotion of the Kosciusko is extolling the 'excitement' of a completely unexpected result last year when the F4 paid some$100K.



 :wacko:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jul-01, 08:03 PM Reply #58 »

Ground stood

The promotion of this pandering to rural racing this year would be entirely different if the race last year went to the first three favourites.

That does not especially concern me -- except that it fosters a feeling that 'anyone' can win this race and that ordinary punters might be beguiled into thinking that  a 'winning ticket' could precede a 'big payout'.

....... it may ....... but not likely, probably.

As I see the deal it is unashamedly presented as a deception to the rural racing community -- playing on local loyalties in an event that has no established basis for having a well-founded opinion based on comparative form.

Why would anyone buy a ticket?

Who does buy 'tickets' -- rural race clubs?


Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Jul-01, 08:18 PM Reply #59 »
If you paid attention you'd know anyone can buy tickets.

One syndicate spent $10k (maybe more) and secured a horse, they had the fav who was scratched then from memory ended up with Awesome Pluck who ran 3rd. I heard the syndicate manager interviewed (Dave Barnhill, ex rugby league player, now publican) who said they also placed a number of bets which well and truly got there money back with plenty of interest   emthup

Another was selected only spent $50.00

It's the luck of the draw to be selected and good luck to those who did.

No I didn't buy a ticket.  :huh:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jul-01, 08:26 PM Reply #60 »

Fairy dust

The story about this year will unfold -- anyone buying 'tickets' should be asked to say why they thought it was sensible.

Not even the independent racing media clique are saying anything other than a bland, party-line, 'buy a ticket' -- there is no sensible suggestion of why anyone would buy a ticket.

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jul-01, 08:33 PM Reply #61 »


........... and while were are questioning the administrators .. ...could we put on notice the question of 'how many free tickets to attend neverest-day will be handed out to members and others?

Pictures of a members grandstand crowded with freeloaders has about the same level of credibility as most photo shopped images these days.

........ maybe they could use last years photos and dispense with the facts.


Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Jul-01, 09:04 PM Reply #62 »
Fairy dust

The story about this year will unfold -- anyone buying 'tickets' should be asked to say why they thought it was sensible.

Not even the independent racing media clique are saying anything other than a bland, party-line, 'buy a ticket' -- there is no sensible suggestion of why anyone would buy a ticket.

Never dreamt what it's like to win Lotto  :whistle:

Dare to dream Pete  ;)

Offline Antitab#

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« 2019-Jul-01, 09:27 PM Reply #63 »
Pete,

I donít know if free tickets are given out on Everest Day and I suspect they arenít.

I would go as far as to say with great meetings in Sydney and Melbourne this is the best days racing on the calendar.

However if free tickets are dispersed,  itís surely good business.

Punters at home canít buy food, beverages, add to on course turn over ( lucrative margin for RNSW)  or even purchase merchandise.

Maybe they bring their kids and the next generation punters get the taste.

The more through the gates the better for PVL and the industry.


Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Jul-02, 08:21 AM Reply #64 »
Anti, all of those valid points will go straight over the head of ole Pete   :biggrin:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Jul-18, 10:25 PM Reply #65 »

The Kosciusko hoax continues to be promoted



Dismiss any hope that state racing administrators will openly disclose the share of Kosciusko tickets sold -- as between individuals and country race clubs.

 ........ why would any individual punter pay $5 for a ticket , which, if a winning ticket would be next to worthless, especially considering the no-chance of winning.

Even so, on 2KSKY, the 'buy now' promotion is on full speed.

Presumably the hoax about 'buying tickets' is somehow intended to snare country race clubs support and the loyalty they may have to a local aspirant.

If so, this is the complete reverse of the related strategy of misusing rural racing to divert racing dollars to rural areas.

Presumably also the marketing men are looking to boost on-course attendance of rural racing aficionados -- an element of making Everest day look like it is popular.

...... let us see, this year, the visual evidence of the ATC bolstering attendance numbers with 'free' entry to the members stand.

[........as an aside ............. looking to see 'other posts' of 'antitab' draws a blank -- apparently, he 'does not exist'.]

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Jul-19, 12:34 PM Reply #66 »
The Kosciusko hoax continues to be promoted



 ........ why would any individual punter pay $5 for a ticket , which, if a winning ticket would be next to worthless, especially considering the no-chance of winning.



Tell that the ticket holder who did a deal with Belflyer?

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Jul-19, 12:57 PM Reply #67 »
Mair chooses to ignore such facts

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Aug-02, 10:31 PM Reply #68 »


Mountain climbing ................. all sizzle but no steak

No one has ever offered a sensible reason for a metropolitan punter to 'buy a Kosciuszko ticket'

The vague -- but relentlessly determined -- media exhortations for ordinary punters to 'buy a ticket' in the Kosciuszko, surely calls into question the the inclination of racing administrators to properly balance a sales-pitch with their  responsibility to treat punters fairly.

Just what is going on here is not clear  -- superficially the K race benefits country connections -- practically, however,  if the identity of those silly enough to buy K tickets, is mainly about rural race clubs supporting local trainers, then the deal becomes a bit perverse -- an outcome quite contrary to the basic plan of using Sydney racing money to subsidize the bush. 

Just imagine if Ms Shocken-Orr , of banking royal commission fame, were to explore the integrity of state racing administrators.

....... sights not seen since lions ate christians in the Colosseum.

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Aug-06, 10:51 PM Reply #69 »

"Don't forget to buy a ticket"

This constant refrain from the 2KSKY media bunker makes one wonder about the independence of the media and what encouragement they may be under from the Kosciuszko hustlers.

I may not mind so much if the simple 'don't forget' was complemented by any sensible reason for a punter to buy a ticket.

Talk about a pig in a poke -- this is a good illustration.

.... and one thing for sure ........we will never be told about the 'tickets sold' and 'who bought them' and from which 'postcodes'


Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Aug-07, 03:55 PM Reply #70 »
"Don't forget to buy a ticket"



.... and one thing for sure ........we will never be told about the 'tickets sold' and 'who bought them' and from which 'postcodes'

Pete - even if you did know, what relevance would that be anyway?

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Aug-07, 09:23 PM Reply #71 »

..................what relevance would that be

The idea that we cannot trust racing administrators to speak truthfully is one that I cannot accept.

Whether it is the 'virtue' of paying 10th to inflate fields, or the nonsense of the O&E bet option funding particular races, it is disturbing that accepted marketing tactics unfairly induce ordinary punters to 'buy a pig in a poke' that, in prospect,  is practically worthless.

The marketing deceptions extend to the highway-robbery races spoiling the early quadrella option for most but rewarding the syndicate operators.

The 'politics' of 'rural races in the city' is even more offensive in that it encourages entourages of rural horses to spend time and money in Sydney to attend the races.

The 'rural races' themselves are unfathomable because the form is incomparable -- and worse it opens the door to stunts where a horse is smoked in to unexpectedly steal the loot.

These 'rural-in-the-city' races should not be run.


Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Aug-08, 11:44 AM Reply #72 »
Pete - even if you did know, what relevance would that be anyway?

Donít bother reading his reply, Gin, itís the same ignorant crap that he cuts and pastes every week despite being proven wrong in every instance

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Sep-03, 07:09 PM Reply #73 »


Game on? ........... the racing industry knows how to play a game


One of the risks with a race like the Kosciuszko is that it will be gamed. The Kosciuszko is the Sydney version of the fairly-called no-star-mile race being run into oblivion by RVL. At least RNSW limited the contenders to 'country' horses and charged for the stable followers to get a vote.

The problem is that plotters will play the game -- an extract from Racenet is illustrative:

THE KOSCIUSZKO ANYONE?

Patient country trainer Danny Williams could have a serious contender for The Kosciuszko on his hands.

The neddy in question is Floki, a six-year-old by Hinchinbrook who has only had four starts but already boasts an eight lengths win at Scone and a midweek city success at Canterbury.


............... there will be some flak if Floki wins!


Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Sep-04, 05:57 AM Reply #74 »
Once again Mair, you are jumping at shadows and proving your ignorance and dishonest commentary on the industry

Floki has exposed form and his recent barrier trial was televised on Sky Channel
I backed it after seeing that trial as Iím sure many other punters have


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