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Brisbane Racing - the Way We Were - Qld Gallops - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Brisbane Racing - the Way We Were  (Read 87908 times)

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Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2014-Nov-22, 01:18 PM Reply #375 »
On cue Cyril Small rides a winner at Ballina   :biggrin:




Offline ratsack

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« 2014-Nov-22, 06:00 PM Reply #376 »
exactly what i thought when the result flashed up      :clap2:

Offline Stan Still

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« 2015-Jan-12, 04:03 PM Reply #377 »
Someone will know this. Noticed these colours going round in Victoria, dark blue with yellow sleeves and red cap, were not these colours used by henry davis, who taught people like john size who taught people like joe pride and trevor rogers.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2015-Jan-12, 05:00 PM Reply #378 »
Someone will know this. Noticed these colours going round in Victoria, dark blue with yellow sleeves and red cap, were not these colours used by henry davis, who taught people like john size who taught people like joe pride and trevor rogers.

Body and sleeves were the same but Henry Davis had a Red Tartan cap. Giddy Up :beer:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2015-Feb-02, 08:08 AM Reply #379 »
Wade Birch reveals one of the yearlings sold at the MM sales returned a positive to anabolic steroids...the horse was sold to Victoria....the trainer states it will be returned to the vendor for a refund...further inquiries to be made. :o

Offline Stan Still

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« 2015-Feb-02, 08:26 AM Reply #380 »
thats a miracle only 1 testing positive. Some years ago I would buy 8-10 yearlings every year, I advocated that when a buyer gets the mandatory scope he/she should be entitled to take a blood sample and have it tested or held at the buyers expense and if needed have it tested for anabolics etc. this was laughed at by breeders naturally, after a while one got to know the breeders who pumped up their youngsters so you just didn't bother to look at them. still cant understand why this isn't done today

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2015-Feb-23, 03:20 PM Reply #381 »
Seems Racing Inquiries aren't a modern thing.

Came across this article by accident. It appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on Thursday 29th October 1929 (when Phar Lap was racing).

This reports on evidence given by John Wren at "The Racing Inquiry".

"When he came to Queensland, the Q.T.C. did not know any more about running a racecourse than Billy the blackfellow".

Imagine if someone said that these days   :lol:








Offline Arsenal

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« 2015-Apr-25, 06:30 AM Reply #382 »
FOR THE LOVE OF THE GAME

Bernie Pramberg Courier Mail 25th April


 Punters and practitioners of the turf are a hardy lot and their resilience shone during the dark days of World War II.

RACING TO VICTORY: US forces lodging at Camp Ascot during World War II, and (below) Thoroughbred Racing History Association president Peter Howard.
 
Within three weeks of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Brisbane racetracks at Eagle Farm and Doomben were transformed into army camps housing thousands of American troops.

More than 30,000 racegoers attended a race meeting at Eagle Farm on the day before the US base at Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese.

They could never have envisaged it would be four and a half years until the next meeting at the Farm.

Virtually overnight, the military took over the two racetracks. Sentries were on duty at the gates and nobody was allowed in.

With the tracks closed, trainers walked their horses to Albion Park for trackwork.

Horse floats could not be used because of Government restrictions on fuel.

Albion Park, the saucershaped sand track with a circumference of 1200m and universally known as “the Creek’’, suddenly became the epicentre of Queensland racing.

Peter Howard, a former long-serving Courier-Mail journalist and columnist, this week presented an insight into racing during the war in a talk presented by the Thoroughbred Racing History Association.

Howard, president of the TRHA, paid respect to servicemen for whom Camp Ascot and Camp Doomben were staging camps before going into action against enemy forces from 1942-45.

“Sadly, US servicemen and Australian Diggers lost their lives in battles to Australia’s north and in the Pacific after spending time in these camps,’’ he said.

Howard’s presentation combined history with colourful anecdotes so typical of the racing game.

One story involved Brisbane trainer, the late Des McGee, who was a boy at the time and was allowed access to the camps by sentries.

“An American soldier gave Des 10 shillings to go down Racecourse Road to buy some sandwiches,’’ Howard said.

“Des came back with the sandwiches which cost four shillings and the Yank told him to keep the change.
“Des showed enterprise beyond his years and raced back to the shop, bought a loaf of bread and a Windsor sausage and made his own pile of sandwiches. He cleared three and a half quid that first day.’’ Although there were calls for racing to be suspended, the overwhelming view was it should continue for several reasons, not the least to boost public morale. Dr Glen McCabe, who attended Howard’s mid-week address, was a medical student and then casualty officer for Brisbane hospitals during the war years.

He later came to appreciate that racing at the Creek helped stimulate and maintain morale during those tough times.

Another who attended the talk at Eagle Farm was Darcy Maddock, son of the legendary Queensland jockey Russell Maddock.

Darcy told how the jockey enlisted in the army but he was so light the recoil from his rifle sent him reeling backwards.

Russell was deployed and trained as a cook.

Another jockey of the time, Noel McGrowdie, tried to enlist early and was extremely keen to join the army and go to war but was rejected on medical grounds.

He was shattered but colleagues nicknamed him “Digger”.

The nickname stuck and “Digger” McGrowdie became known as the Cups King and won the 1957 Melbourne Cup.

Weekly race meetings at Albion Park from 1942-45 drew crowds of 30,000 and top gallopers of the time including Auction, Repshot and High Rank were idolised.

Auction, who carried as much as 12st 6lb (69.5kg) to victory at the Creek, was a particular favourite of the American troops.

Race clubs throughout Queensland, both city and country, supported the war effort with the Queensland Turf Club providing the Government with an interest-free loan of £5000, equivalent to more than $1 million today.

Albion Park was prone to king tides from Breakfast Creek when water backed up in drains, flooding parts of the course, including the betting rings.

Howard related a story of an Aussie soldier striding through ankle-deep water in the betting ring with a meat pie in one hand, rain flowing off his slouch hat, flooding the back of his greatcoat.

Undeterred, he scanned the bookies’ boards, studied the odds and took a bite from his pie before making a bet.

An American general, watching from the members’ grandstand turned to his Australian host: “Colonel,’’ he said.

 
“Give me a battalion of men like that and I will win this goddamn war in no time.’’

 :thumbsup:

Offline dubbledee

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« 2015-Apr-25, 09:23 AM Reply #383 »
Was a most illuminating lecture from Peter Howard.

Stack of research uncovering news snippets which had been long-lost in the archives.

We'll ensure it gets another run to a larger audience at an appropriate time.

 :thumbsup:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2015-Sep-03, 08:26 AM Reply #384 »

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2015-Sep-06, 11:12 AM Reply #385 »

Another jockey of the time, Noel McGrowdie, tried to enlist early and was extremely keen to join the army and go to war but was rejected on medical grounds.

He was shattered but colleagues nicknamed him “Digger”.

The nickname stuck and “Digger” McGrowdie became known as the Cups King and won the 1957 Melbourne Cup.

An alternative record vis-à-vis the nic


This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 15, (MUP), 2000

 At the age of 7 he started to win show events and from 11 drove cattle during his holidays. He completed his schooling at St Mary's Christian Brothers' College and was apprenticed as a 14-year-old to Les Roberts, a horse-trainer at Toowoomba. His indentures were later transferred to the leading Brisbane trainer George Anderson. McGrowdie was so small and thin that Anderson 'set him to digging in the garden every spare moment to build up his muscles—and the other boys soon lighted on the name Digger'.

The nickname stuck among the racing fraternity, and the digging paid off. McGrowdie became a 'pocket dynamo' of a jockey. In 1936 he won his first race, leading all the way on Thought Reader in the Tattersall's Handicap. He was rejected for military service in World War II because of his size; the manpower authorities put him to work on the wharfs and allowed him to ride locally.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2015-Nov-24, 04:53 PM Reply #386 »
Things were tough in 1954 as this pic from the book "They're Racing" shows....... jockeys many sitting on the grass between rides at Albion Park "The Creek" Bronco Conquest described as a renowned creek rider is on the bottom right but there are no other names...I think the tallest guy touching his cap towards the left looks like "Bustling" Bill Briscoe and the jockey in the all Black on the far right with his arms folded reminds me of a young Brian Wakefield......could be Mel Schumacher in the light jacket black sash and maybe Barry Squair on the left Of Brian Wakefield. :shrug:





Giddy Up :beer:
« Last Edit: 2015-Nov-24, 05:21 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2016-Mar-21, 06:59 AM Reply #387 »
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wgy-EGJovhw

A mate emailed me this video..... Brisbane City in the Sun ......circa 1954 things were a lot different then and the landmark building was the City Hall which is now dwarfed by commercial high rise....no trams anymore and shops don't close at midday Saturday.......at around 6.59 there's some racing shots showing the massive crowds and the high dress standard of patrons....this has gone by the board ...strappers back then wore suits and hats ...now some come in joggers .....and there's a race without audio from the old sand track at Albion Park....which suited some horses more than others.

Creekers were something to bet on generally they ran true to form  as meetings were only held every 4 or 5 weeks interspersed between Eagle Farm and Doomben ..... horses that were good on the turf were usually kept for there ....some more versatile ones were good on both grass and sand Lucky Ring a good creeker won  Stradbrokes......Red Seas was probably the best creeker I saw ......some of the best I remember were Fox O' Kenmore ...Gallant John.....Torquar was also good on the grass.....and Sumarco trained by Jim Atkins...one day ridden by John Harbutt  the inside rein broke and Harbutt still managed to steer him around the tight turns to win in top company a First Division...which was the main race usually run around 3pm followed by Second ...Third and Fourth Dvisions ...I used to come just before the main race and didn't bother with the lower grades......the film shows the race starting at the top of the straight ..that's the Flat enclose behind the start......the cheap seats about 1bob or 1/6....there was a Leger enclosure and Paddock for us toffs......there were four starts 51/2 furlongs 7 +furlongs a Mile and 10 furlongs ...once I saw a horse which failed to make the turn out of the straight and finished through the fence almost into the Bottle O's yard over the back fence.

A small number of trainers had stables in the back streets off Crosby Rd Bobby Locke was one I knew Percy Wise ..Oysters Kent...and F W Davis ....after night trotting started Hollywood John McMullen had his stables in the back street near the float entrance and members car park.

Now Albion Park is greyhounds and harness only.....absent the crowds. :tears:


Giddy Up :beer:

Offline dubbledee

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« 2016-Jun-20, 01:30 PM Reply #388 »
No concerns for track ratings at the opening meeting for Royal Ipswich in 1861.

The 3-mile event would have been exciting, no doubt.  :/

http://www.qt.com.au/news/how-racing-legend-was-born/3047464/

Offline tontonan

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« 2016-Jun-20, 07:50 PM Reply #389 »
" It was the most important horse race that had ever taken place in the Australian colonies and was created by a few Ipswich sportsmen."

Beryl Johnston is having a lend of herself.  That race was nothing like the most important race to have taken place in the colonies.  It was a less than satisfactory renewal of the race that had been successfully staged at Flemington in 1859 and Randwick in 1860 and it only got off the ground because Zoe's owner, the Hall of fame's John Tait, took his mare to Ipswich to make a foregone conclusion of the prizemoney.   Zoe had won the Randwick renewal and finished second in the inaugural at Flemington. 

At Flemington 18 horses from Victoria, NSW, South Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand faced the starter and 30,000 spectators.  The race was huge success and financed the reconfiguration of the course and the building of a proper grandstand, while a private company was encouraged to run a railway into the course.  The race proved to be the progenitor of the Melbourne Cup.

At Randwick the race marked the return of racing to the Sandy Course after 20 years of racing at Homebush.  The field was smaller but much accomplished with representatives from Victoria, Tasmania and New Zealand and the event drew the biggest crowd assembled to that time at Randwick.

But at Ipswich there was Zoe and 3 local hacks and it made a mockery of itself as an inter colonial championship. 

The race proved to be a repeated success in Melbourne and Sydney, even in Geelong and Ballarat but the further it moved away from the metropoles the less viable it became. It was held in Wagga Wagga, Ballarat, Geelong, Launceston and Dunedin in NZ until the race eventually settled in Launceston and that bright carnival was well patronized by mainlanders until, in a fit of parochialism, the club changed the race to a handicap in an effort to mimic the Melbourne Cup then weighted all the best horses from the mainland so cruelly that none made the trip to Tasmania.  Ultimately the race died and morphed into the Launceston Cup.


Offline Board Odds

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« 2017-Apr-13, 03:51 PM Reply #390 »
The Late 1960's and Early/Middle 1970's was a Great Era to grow-up in and be involved with Racing in the Central West Queensland area (CQRA).

Some great Trainers, Punters, Bookies, Horses, Jockeys and "Race-Course Characters" !!

Offline pegasyber

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« 2017-Apr-14, 08:13 AM Reply #391 »
   Pretty sure Jim Counsel was their representative on the TAB of Queensland Board; a Board that had directors  of some forty Public Companies, at a time when they were calling for at least one representative of the punting fraternity. The chairman said there was never a more representative board of experienced punters, that sat around that board table.   

Offline arthur

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« 2017-Apr-14, 08:22 AM Reply #392 »
The Late 1960's and Early/Middle 1970's was a Great Era to grow-up in and be involved with Racing in the Central West Queensland area (CQRA).

Some great Trainers, Punters, Bookies, Horses, Jockeys and "Race-Course Characters" !!

Well B/O . . you'd better release some stories, after that intro

Offline arthur

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« 2017-Jun-24, 07:44 PM Reply #393 »
Where's "Board Odds" . .  :what: :o :what:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Apr-20, 10:27 PM Reply #394 »



No shortage of bookmakers in Brisbane at the Brisbane Cup meeting on 10 June 1963. Campo won the cup and Mullala won the Stradbroke on the Saturday.

Giddy up :beer:


Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Dec-20, 09:39 AM Reply #395 »



Queen Street Brisbane circa 1960's after dark  with the trams still running going south  in this pic towards the Victoria Bridge .....the neon lights of the Regent theatre which changed coliur every few minutes ...now it's The Queen Street Mall pedestrians only plus a few obstacles for demonstrations or musical entertainment cafes .

Giddy Up :beer:



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