Queensland Racing Commission of Inquiry 2007/12 - Qld Gallops - Racehorse TALK
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Queensland Racing Commission of Inquiry 2007/12 - Qld Gallops - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Queensland Racing Commission of Inquiry 2007/12  (Read 566091 times)

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2014-Dec-16, 07:14 AM Reply #3725 »
Seeing that RQ sought legal opinion on the prospects of recovering the money paid in the so called redundancy to the four highly paid executives following the reporting of a finding in an unrelated case that the money was recoverable ..it's surprising that there's no mention of this in RQ's annual report.....the legal opinion would have been delivered fairly quickly I assume and the result known and understood in time for inclusion in their annual accounting of their activities as a matter of public interest...in view of my recent expertise in extracting a copy of the previously unpublished report of the Racing Integrity Commissioner I'm considering asking some penetrating questions from RQ once Darren Condon resumes his seat at the big office in the Deagon bunker after his hols in Honkers....although I think I know what the result is likely to be. Giddy Up. :beer:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2017-May-19, 02:07 PM Reply #3726 »

May 16 2017

ASIC quietly drops case against Queensland Racing officials

Mark Solomons

The corporate watchdog quietly dropped a case against 10 senior Queensland racing officials referred for investigation by a commission of inquiry in 2014.

The Australian Securities and Investments Commission found insufficient evidence to proceed against Bill Ludwig, the Labor powerbroker and a former board member of Racing Queensland, nor other board members and executives including chairman Bob Bentley.


Labor powerbroker Bill Ludwig was a board member of Racing Queensland.
Labor powerbroker Bill Ludwig was a board member of Racing Queensland. Photo: Glenn Hunt
 
The Newman LNP state government's three-month inquiry into the racing industry was chaired by retired Supreme Court Justice Margaret White, who was in July appointed joint head of the probe into youth detention in the Northern Territory.

Justice White found a raft of suspected breaches of the Corporations Act by Mr Ludwig, Mr Bentley and others
 
Racing Queensland executives signed lucrative contracts shortly before they left the organisation.
Racing Queensland executives signed lucrative contracts shortly before they left the organisation. Photo: Jenny Evans
 
The inquiry focused on the circumstances under which Racing Queensland executives signed lucrative new contracts boosting their entitlements just before they left the body; it also queried millions of dollars in payments to gaming company TattsBet.

But Mr Bentley confirmed he had received written advice from ASIC in late 2014, a few months after the report was handed down, that there was insufficient evidence for the regulator to take any action.

"It was a political bloody stitch-up," Mr Bentley told Fairfax Media.

He said the executives receiving large pay-outs "wasn't a good look" but such contractual arrangements had been needed at the time to try to prevent key staff leaving as Racing Queensland negotiated $110 million of extra funding from the Bligh government.

Former Racing Queensland chairman Bob Bentley.
Former Racing Queensland chairman Bob Bentley. Photo: Tony Phillips
 
"It wasn't some shonky little deal cooked up in a back room," he said.

Mr Bentley said the inquiry "found nothing because there was nothing to find".

"It could have been resolved over a cup of coffee," he said.

As well as Mr Ludwig and Mr Bentley, the inquiry referred to ASIC former chief executive Malcolm Tuttle, along with former board directors Anthony Hanmer, Robert Lette, Wayne Milner and Bradley Ryan; and executives Shara Reid, Paul Brennan and Kerry Watson.

An ASIC spokesman said the watchdog had taken no action against any of the people referred to it by the inquiry.

The probe took place under then-racing minister and LNP MP Steve Dickson, who has since defected to One Nation.

Mr Dickson declined to comment except to say it was a "fair inquiry and it did make recommendations". He said then-LNP attorney-general Jarrod Bleijie had overseen the inquiry, not him.

The White Inquiry was the seventh official inquiry into racing in Queensland since 1920.

Justice White wrote in her report that "it would be a matter of great regret if this Commission were just another cathartic event in the history of racing in Queensland, from which no lessons are learned".

Meanwhile, investigations into alleged criminality and rorting in the industry continue. Queensland's Crime and Corruption Commission is investigating alleged criminal activity in the awarding of contracts by Racing Queensland for racetrack upgrades. It has not been revealed what period the offences relate to, but they are understood to have occurred since the 2014 inquiry.

As part of the probe, codenamed Operation Yardage, the CCC last week charged two men with fraud, forgery and misconduct offences.

They are both due to appear in the Brisbane Magistrates Court on June 7.

http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/asic-quietly-drops-case-against-queensland-racing-officials-20170515-gw5lu8.html

That's All folks. :bye:

 

Offline arthur

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« 2017-May-19, 03:32 PM Reply #3727 »

That's All folks. :bye:


No . . Not 'ALL'

Just the close of THAT chapter

Offline Arsenal

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« 2017-May-23, 07:50 PM Reply #3728 »
INDUSTRY ANGER OVER BELATED CLEARANCE OF BENTLEY BOARD

By TERRY BUTTS of the NORTH QUEENSLAND REGISTER

YOU might have missed it last week as it wasn’t carried by mainstream media – but for those maintaining an interest in racing – it is well worth repeating.

The news that ASIC - our precious Australian Securities and Investments Commission has found insufficient evidence to proceed with charges against former Racing Queensland Chairman Bob Bentley and his big-time Labor cohort and former Board member Bill Ludwig – has hardly been welcomed by some sections of the industry.

After what seems like an eternity ASIC has reportedly rejected the findings of Supreme Court Justice Margaret White, at the conclusion of her three month inquiry into the racing industry in 2014, that there were a raft of suspected breaches of the Corporations Act by Ludwig, Bentley and others.

One could argue that this has all become very political. Many accuse strong-man Bentley of being the architect of what is now a seemingly dysfunctional Racing Queensland and they still question how Ludwig ever made it onto the Racing Board considering his Labor ties.

The inquiry focused on many controversial actions of the Bentley Board, highlighted by the circumstances surrounding executives signing lucrative new contracts boosting their entitlements just before they left the body soon after a change of Government. According to a media report it also questioned millions of dollars in alleged payments to gaming company, TattsBet, of which Bentley was at one time a Board member.

Bentley has confirmed receiving written advice from ASIC in late 2014, that there was insufficient evidence for action to be taken against him or his fellow Board members.

Why then has it taken this long for the industry to be made aware of this? Did the Board that replaced him regard it as news not worth telling or did the former LNP Government prefer that it not be released at the risk of embarrassing them after such another costly racing inquiry?

Yet the decision has only just been made public which begs the question. WHY?

“It was a political bloody stitch-up,” Bentley told Fairfax Media.

He said the executives receiving large pay-outs ‘wasn't a good look’ but such contractual arrangements had been needed at the time to try to prevent key staff leaving as Racing Queensland negotiated $110 million of extra funding from the Labor Government.

“It wasn't some shonky little deal cooked up in a back room,” he said.

Of course not!

The White Inquiry was the seventh official Inquiry into Racing in Queensland since 1920.

She wrote in her report that “it would be a matter of great regret if this Commission were just another cathartic event in the history of racing in Queensland, from which no lessons are learned”.

Bentley might have escaped unscathed but there is neither celebration nor sympathy in the larger racing community, particularly in country Queensland.

He dismantled all the country Racing Associations – a great mistake in the eyes of many, and, as a breeder himself, is accused of displaying favouritism to that sector of the industry.

Bentley was the one to put the dogs and trots under the same umbrella as the gallops and the result of that sheer folly is clearly evident – even today. And we won’t even touch on Toowoomba and the mass waste of racing industry funds spent on track redevelopment. Let alone his stubborn refusal to allow Townsville Turf Club to sell a block of land they had been offered $16 million for.

The same block of land still lies idle today with a value of less than half the amount once offered.

On a national level, as the somewhat unlikely Chairman of the Australian Racing Board, he ‘ran an embarrassing second’ to the jockeys in the infamous whip regulations that he tried to enforce.

Bentley will be remembered for what he didn’t do for racing - not for what little he actually achieved.

Meanwhile, investigations into alleged criminality and rorting in the industry continue. Queensland's Crime and Corruption Commission is investigating alleged criminal activity in the awarding of contracts by Racing Queensland for racetrack upgrades (since the Bentley era). As part of the probe, codenamed Operation Yardage, the CCC recently charged two men with fraud, forgery and misconduct offences.

They are both due to appear in the Brisbane Magistrates Court on June 7.

Meanwhile, we hear that Bill Schuck - a former employee of Racing Queensland now working for race course builder Evergreen – is currently on site at the new track going in at Pakenham, near Melbourne.

From www.letsgohorseracing.com.au

Giddy Up :beer:

 

Offline arthur

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« 2017-May-23, 08:55 PM Reply #3729 »
Meanwhile, we hear that Bill Schuck - a former employee of Racing Queensland

Gee . . What happened to Bill??

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-May-23, 09:47 PM Reply #3730 »
Bill now works for the mob who built Eagle Farm.

If one was a wag they might say they were the root of all the trouble  :icecream:

pun intended   :biggrin:

Offline arthur

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« 2017-May-23, 10:25 PM Reply #3731 »
Probably good money in making tracks . .

Would depend on how many bills you had to pay, I suppose

Offline johnojohnson

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« 2017-May-24, 02:12 PM Reply #3732 »
If the combined gaggle of gooses responsible for the disaster laid a STRATH-AYR track all would be rosy moving forward

I can see the whole thing getting pulled up and the real track building company that laid Mackay's track(best in Australia) which can take 200mls of rain in the 12 hours before a meeting and just get to heavy

Just don't get the gaggle of incompetants in QRIC involved they cant manage a phone line

Offline arthur

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« 2017-May-24, 02:18 PM Reply #3733 »
A la TWBA

But it's country racing that is draining the RQ coffers  :stop:

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-May-24, 09:22 PM Reply #3734 »
If the combined gaggle of gooses responsible for the disaster laid a STRATH-AYR track all would be rosy moving forward

I can see the whole thing getting pulled up and the real track building company that laid Mackay's track(best in Australia) which can take 200mls of rain in the 12 hours before a meeting and just get to heavy

Just don't get the gaggle of incompetants in QRIC involved they cant manage a phone line

Can't argue with much of that JJ.

From a distance I doubt the construction was the problem, it's the programming & management after that has created this debacle. One thing I do know, it won't be any good until they do some major works although I wouldn't go as far as to suggest ripping it up (yet)

Offline ratsack

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« 2017-May-24, 09:41 PM Reply #3735 »
Can't argue with much of that JJ.

From a distance I doubt the construction was the problem, it's the programming & management after that has created this debacle. One thing I do know, it won't be any good until they do some major works although I wouldn't go as far as to suggest ripping it up (yet)

from a distance i think in 12 months it will be the 2nd best track in aus behind newcastle
 8-)

Offline johnojohnson

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« 2017-May-25, 01:09 PM Reply #3736 »
Hope your right but why would it take 2 years when Mackay AND Townsvilles 2 STRATH tracks have performed at a QLD industry best standard from DAY 1.....surely they didn't go for the cheapest quote?

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-May-25, 04:42 PM Reply #3737 »
Throw in the inner track at Newcastle  :whistle:


Offline ratsack

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« 2017-May-25, 07:04 PM Reply #3738 »
Throw in the inner track at Newcastle  :whistle:

and main track     emthup

beautiful  :love:

Offline johnojohnson

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« 2017-May-27, 08:53 AM Reply #3739 »
The Eagle Farm track looks DOOMED........no rain in 7 days and its a heavy 9

How do the Strath tracks cope with 100-150 ml of rain in the 48 hours prior including race day and not touch heavy,,,,,,,,,pull the goat track up and sue the builders and get a track that funds the industry statewide via betting turnover..............

The north has 2 surfaces unrivalled by STRATHAYR that can race with nearby flooding!........it also had 2 other tracks ROCKHAMPTON and CAIRNS not built by the strath team that have been nightmares from day 1



Offline father ross

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« 2017-May-28, 03:15 PM Reply #3740 »
ASIC    And so, the  Margaret White enquiry takes ASIck years to announce a decision.  - 
Obviously  hoping we would forget!     ASIC is wrong and your secretive, delayed announcement proves so.
Some people are just protected species. JMO

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-May-28, 03:43 PM Reply #3741 »
ASIC    And so, the  Margaret White enquiry takes ASIck years to announce a decision.  - 
Obviously  hoping we would forget!     ASIC is wrong and your secretive, delayed announcement proves so.
Some people are just protected species. JMO

Agree padre.

There are some government departments, especially (but not exclusively) Federal government who have been allowed to empower themselves under weak ministers far beyond what the general population would like them to do. ASIC is one. The Federal Dept. Of Health and the ACCC are others.

ASIC overturning a Supreme Court Justice ruling would go down like a lead balloon I would think in some quarters.

I'm struggling to get my head around how this can happen? At what point did our legal system become answerable to public servants?


Offline father ross

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« 2017-May-29, 09:10 AM Reply #3742 »
Maybe because there are so many of them ? They must breed like lemmings.    A cliff, A cliff, my kingdom for a cliff..............................

◾In June 2016 there were 1,924,800 public sector employees. There were 243,300 employees in Commonwealth government, 1,495,100 in state government and 186,500 in local government.
◾In 2015-16, the total cash wages and salaries for the public sector was $146,830.5 million.
« Last Edit: 2017-May-29, 09:17 AM by father ross »

Offline dean

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« 2017-May-29, 09:25 AM Reply #3743 »
Let me say I disagree completely with the ASIC decision. However they have every right to disagree with recommendations made by former Supreme Court Judges. These judges should not be seen as omnipotent. They are simply appointed by the State Political Party in power at the time. Gee crooks like Bjelke Peterson made his share of appointments. Judges after all are just public servants of the State variety as opposed to the Commonwealth variety at ASIC.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-May-29, 10:12 AM Reply #3744 »
Let me say I disagree completely with the ASIC decision. However they have every right to disagree with recommendations made by former Supreme Court Judges. These judges should not be seen as omnipotent. They are simply appointed by the State Political Party in power at the time. Gee crooks like Bjelke Peterson made his share of appointments. Judges after all are just public servants of the State variety as opposed to the Commonwealth variety at ASIC.

The Administrative Appeals Tribunal has overruled the Minister For Immigration 4,000 times when he has tried to deport "refugees" like the Lindt Cafe gunman.

There are these public sector departments that have become empowered (or more importantly found out ways to empower themselves via weak ministers) and we have arrived at a point where they are allowed to overrule (not only) the judiciary but the elected representatives of parliament.

While free speech is not in the Constitution, it is clearly implied in our country, and everyone would agree you have a right to voice your disagreement.

But there has to be a line in the sand.

I have no idea who is on ASIC. I do know who is in government though because they stood at the election wishing to be a representative of their constituents.

Did you know that from 2018 if you get a cold you will not be able to obtain cold and flu tablets from the local chemist? Thanks to (yet another) one of these empowered bodies, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) who received submissions from the same people who want vaccinations banned that they should stop chemists selling any medications with psuedoephidrine or codeine in them.

The whole driver is that the people who get to sit on these boards/committees become very powerful and as we know along with power comes money.

How that has come about is because the lazy elected officials let their own departments dictate to them what happens, and more importantly how the money is spent - and typically more spent on themselves.

What about the ACCC? About 4 years ago they told Coles and Woolworths (listed ASX companies) to stop giving away 8 cents a litre petrol vouchers to the man in the street in order to protect the German company Aldi.

Here we are a few years down the track and both companies are really struggling, which means the shareholders (typically Australian Superannuation funds) aren't getting a decent return on their investment. And I read an article in the paper last week how Aldi are doing so well and are expanding.

Well done Rod Simms. Bet you your German shareholders are really happy.

The real cruncher is that if Woolies or Coles tried to set up shop in Germany they would be told to  :censored:  off by the EU, and to take their Aussie lamb with them  :rant:


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