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The New Improved Racing Queensland 2015 - ? - Qld Gallops - Racehorse TALK

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« 2018-Oct-26, 08:59 AM Reply #1725 »
A group of  10 mainly TAB race clubs have put their money where their mouths are and sponsored a full page ad in today's CM as an open letter to the Qld Guvment declaring their support for the strike called by the industry alliance group.....the body of the message reiterates that Qld racing is the poor relation of NSW & Victoria whose guvments support the industry in their states.....a message that has already been heard by the guvment ...and ignored ....something new might have made more impact.

As Parliament isn't sitting the opposition will be stamping their feet to unleash on the hapless Hinchy when it's their chance to turn the screws next week to keep the pot boiling. I wouldn't get too excited though that things will change very much as QLD racing has always lagged behind the larger states no matter which of the political parties have control of the purse strings.....remember thethe Hon. Dicko "the furlong in front: guy" from the LNP ...he's gone but not forgotten ....in the instant case it's clear the QLD guvment is badly out of step with the southern states on the PoC tax.

At the most recent sittings in the house of stoush The Hon. Hinchy made a ministerial statement talking up the guvment's committment to the racing industry.....that was when the talks were ongoing and the proposed strike had been put on hold........the only thing that he and the strikers agreed on is that the racing industry injects $1.2B into the economy and employs some 40, 000 people directly.

In question time LNP member Jon-Paul Langbroek endeavoured to put the pressure on Hinchy's handling of the racing industry which is reproduced from Hansard for our edification.

" Racing Industry Mr LANGBROEK: My question without notice is to the Minister for Racing. Does the minister take responsibility for failing to properly consult and negotiate an acceptable funding arrangement for the racing industry prior to the introduction of Labor’s new tax, given the industry’s response of threats of strikes?

Mr HINCHLIFFE: I thank the member for the question. I start by thanking the racing industry for the patience, grace and dignity that they show in their dealings with the government, particularly over the past couple of weeks. Just last week, as I referenced in my ministerial statement earlier today, we had a very productive meeting. Since that time we have seen a withdrawal of the threat of strike action or at least a postponement of it. I thank them for that. At the meeting we heard firsthand about the needs of the industry, as I said earlier. I reiterate on the record the Palaszczuk government’s support for the racing industry. As I said, this year the equivalent of more than 100 per cent of the revenue from the point-of-consumption tax will go into racing. Clearly, already arrangements are in place so that half of the revenue from the point-ofconsumption tax in the out years is going back to the racing industry[/b].
That is in complete contrast to the mistruths and the assertions that have been made by some in this place and beyond, including in the news media, that there is no income back to the racing industry from the point-of-consumption tax. That is an out-and-out mistruth. It is an unmitigated mistruth I think it is important that the industry understands what this government is doing for the industry and that they are hearing that message. We are working with them, and not just with the thoroughbreds but also across all codes That is why I will be having further meetings today with representatives from the racing industry and the harness industry.It is important that we continue to consult about this tax, which is all about getting something out of corporate bookmakers who have contributed nothing. It is about how we get something out of them and make sure that they contribute back to the industry, to the state of Queensland and to good outcomes, like contributing to programs to get people and particularly children who are underrepresented in sport involved in sporting activities in this state.That is where some of this funding is going. That is the right thing to be doing on behalf of Queenslanders. I will continue to work in partnership with the Treasurer in her role overseeing the tax and with this industry to make sure that we continue to deliver for the racing industry as the Palaszczuk government has done in spades."
[/b]

That was from the18th October the nextsittings start on Tuesday....Hinchy is up against it he no doubt would like to be able to deliver but doesn't have the clout Anna wasn't moved as she showed on the TV news a night or so ago and Trad only wants to hang on to the revenue that the three codes generate ..it's also clear that the strikers are looking after themselves emphasising that racing raises most of the revenue from the PoC tax the harness and greyhounds are on their own .

Giddy Up :beer:





« Last Edit: 2018-Oct-26, 09:07 AM by Arsenal »

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« 2018-Oct-26, 12:25 PM Reply #1726 »
Meeting in bid to fix racing crisis

RESPECTED businessman and former racing administrator Gary Pemberton will chair a crisis meeting today in a bid to break the racing industry deadlock.

The meeting was brokered last night between senior State Government officials and the thoroughbred racing industry.

Mr Pemberton will act as an independent chairman at the meeting, which will “explore the challenges the industry faces and look at the steps we might need to take to build a strong and prosperous racing industry”.

Regardless of the meeting’s outcome, there will be no TAB meetings in Queensland tomorrow.

However, a breakthrough would avert planned strike action on Melbourne Cup Day. ENDS

If the guvment is fairdinkum this mediation might result in a breakthrough just like Hawkey did when he was ACTU President would intervene at a crucial moment in industrial disputes to achieve a satisfactory outcome......  Gary Pemberton races horses in QLD they carry the same colours as former champion miler CHATHAM who won two Cox Plates two Epsoms one Doncaster and numerous other group races before most of us were born.

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« 2018-Oct-26, 03:44 PM Reply #1727 »
Some progress apparently


Nathan Exelby
‏Verified account @xlbnathan_cmail
27m27 minutes ago


Deal struck for $26m per year for prizemoney going forward. Strike action for Cup day called off

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« 2018-Oct-26, 05:47 PM Reply #1728 »
Brisbane racing back on as deal struck with state government
Nathan Exelby, The Courier-Mail
41 minutes ago

AFTER a marathon meeting today, the State Government and Racing Queensland have struck a deal to deliver $26 million in new prize money to the industry.

It is understood $18 million will be injected on November 1, with a further $8 million to come in six months.

Queensland racing strike confirmed

Strike threat takes racing to the brink

The deal is ongoing, meaning $26 million will be injected into the industry annually.

Race meetings will still not go ahead in Queensland tomorrow but the new deal averts any future strike action for Melbourne Cup day, where TAB meetings in Queensland will now proceed as scheduled.

Events at some of the state’s biggest racecourses, including Doomben in Brisbane, Toowoomba and Townsville, would all have been affected by the planned strike.

Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said the deal means there will now be racing on Melbourne Cup day in Queensland.

“The government and reprepresentatives of the racing industry, thoroughbred industry, have reached agreement about bringing an immediate injection of prizemoney into the thoroughbred industry and with further commitments to reform and improvement of the commerciality and sustainability of the industry which will dleliver further prizemoney boosts this year,” he said.

Thoroughbred Racing Alliance spokesman Cameron Partington described the deal as “very, very good for the racing industry”.

“This will restore some confidence. Most importantly we have a relationship with the government now we can work on,” Partington said.

The money will come from consolidated government revenue and there is a commitment for it to be ongoing.

The deal also comes with a number of industry reforms that are required to take place, including increasing the proportion of TAB meetings run in Queensland.

“Queensland has the highest proportion of race events that are not TAB events and therefore don’t contribute as strongly (to wagering revenue),” Hinchliffe said.

“We want to see that change. Work with industry in a range of ways to improve the strength of the industry that feeds back into making it sustainable.

“The reality is we are delivering an outcome that meets the needs around sustainability in the short term, but most importantly focuses on improving commerciality in the long term.”
ENDS

There was a few screen shots on the 5 O'clock news with the parties emerging from the meeting with Trad and Hinchy ....at the end the camera focused on him stammering um um without giving him the opportunity to say whatever it was he was thinking......if they wanted to make a spectacle of him they succeeded pretty poor form IMO...he should be given some credit getting one over Trad especially  after Annastacia ruled out helping..  but apart from that cheap shot  it looks all good for the present ....as long as the small print doesn't have any surprises...more TAB meetings isn't a new direction it was fore shadowed some time back.......the problem will the horses and riders be of a sufficiently high standard to entice punters nobody will want to bet on meetings at Bullabukanka .

Giddy Up :beer:

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« 2018-Oct-26, 06:00 PM Reply #1729 »
Queensland's Melbourne Cup races to go ahead following deal
Felicity Caldwell
By Felicity Caldwell
26 October 2018 — 4:00pm


Melbourne Cup races will go ahead in Queensland, after the racing industry brokered a deal with the state government.

It comes amid a stoush with the industry about the state government's 15 per cent point of consumption betting tax, and calls for increased prize money.

Melbourne Cup Day at Doomben in 2015.
Melbourne Cup Day at Doomben in 2015.CREDIT:GLENN HUNT

Saturday's Cox Plate race meetings at Brisbane's Doomben, Gold Coast, Townsville and Toowoomba will remain cancelled as a result of the strike.

But following a marathon almost five-hour meeting on Friday between jockey, trainer, owner and breeder representatives of the Thoroughbread Alliance, Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe and Deputy Premier Jackie Trad - and promises of $26 million extra in prize money - Queensland punters will be able to enjoy the races trackside on November 6.

Under the deal, prize money levels for Queensland thoroughbred TAB race meetings will increase by $26 million in exchange for a commitment from the Thoroughbred Alliance to continue discussions and sign up to broader industry reforms.

There will be an immediate $18 million increase in prize money on November 1 and a further $8 million in six months.

Mr Hinchliffe said the extra $26 million would come from general government revenue, there would not be any service cuts as a result, and the changes would be reflected in December's Mid-Year Fiscal and Economic Review.

Mr Hinchliffe said planned reforms to increase the "commerciality" of the industry would deliver even more prize money.

"They're things that have been canvassed as part of Racing Queensland's commercial plan, including increasing the proportion of TAB events across the range of events that happen in Queensland," he said.

"Queensland has the highest proportion of race days and race events that are not TAB events and therefore do not contribute strongly to wagering outcomes for the commercial industry.

"We want to see that change and improve."

Ms Trad described the conversations during Friday's mammoth meeting as “very frank and respectful”.


Australian Trainers Association Queensland spokesman Cameron Partington said the outcome was very good for the racing industry.

“[It will] restore some confidence but most importantly we’ve got a relationship now with the government we can work on and go forward with and make even more benefits for the thoroughbred racing industry, which is fantastic,” he said.

Mr Partington said the $26 million increase was a 25 per cent increase on the amount of prize money that was available on Thursday.

In a statement issued on Thursday night by Mr Hinchliffe and Ms Trad, they said the meeting would explore the challenges of the industry and options for industry reform.

"We know the industry is seeking further increases in prize money and we will continue to talk to representatives from all codes, including harness and greyhound racing, in the coming days and weeks," the statement said.

Non-TAB meetings at Isisford, Gympie, Gladstone, Charleville, Clifton and Richmond were expected to go ahead on Saturday.

The threat of strike action began last week after the state government did not meet the industry's deadline to agree to return 100 per cent of the racing component of the new point of consumption tax to racing.

The state government introduced the tax in this year's budget, which means all bets on Queensland events are now taxed at 15 per cent.

The tax was expected to raise up to $70 million in its first year.

The racing industry has complained that prize money for Saturday metropolitan race meetings in Queensland was 45 per cent of Sydney's level, while it was at 75 per cent a decade ago.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk previously said her government had invested more than $190 million in the sector since being elected in 2015.

Slightly more detail   from Felicity Caldwell

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Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Oct-27, 07:11 AM Reply #1730 »


"Queensland has the highest proportion of race days and race events that are not TAB events and therefore do not contribute strongly to wagering outcomes for the commercial industry.

"We want to see that change and improve."

Ms Trad described the conversations during Friday's mammoth meeting as “very frank and respectful”.




Ahem.

Who was saying that over a year ago (and copping some flak for it)  :angel:

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« 2018-Oct-27, 09:18 AM Reply #1731 »
Racing rejoices in $26m ceasefire
NATHAN EXELBY
RACING EDITOR

RACING Queensland is set to announce sweeping prizemoney increases across the state early next week after a $26 million deal was struck with the State Government yesterday.

At a five-hour round table meeting chaired by former TAB and Racing NSW chairman Gary Pemberton, the Government committed an ongoing annual $26 million into prizemoney, the first $18 million will be injected from November 1.

The remaining $8 million of the first-year allocation will be introduced in six months.

In return, the Government has asked for an undertaking from the industry that it will seek broader reforms to ensure long-term sustainability.

“There’s now general agreement that industry sustainability can only come from reform. We’ll now work closely with industry to explore what those changes might look like,” Treasurer Jackie Trad said.

Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe noted reforms were likely to come with a change in the ratio of non-TAB to TAB racing, where Queensland had the highest proportion of non-TABs in the country.

“We want to see that change. Work with industry in a range of ways to improve the strength of the industry that feeds back into making it sustainable,” he said.

Racing Queensland expects to be in a position to announce the details of how the new prizemoney schedules will look by early next week.

Discussions with government regarding funding for the harness and greyhound industries is ongoing, but it is hoped there will be a positive outcome for those two codes in the near future as well.


Negotiations on this issue started after the thoroughbred industry took exception to what it believed was a raw deal in the initial point of consumption tax allocation announcement this month.

The $26 million represents a 25 per cent increase on the level of prizemoney being distributed in the thoroughbred code across the state.

It is a triumph for unity, as all sectors of the thoroughbred industry stood together in their steadfast belief that racing deserved a better deal.

Thoroughbred Alliance spokesman Cameron Partington said he was proud to be part of a unified front that had opened doors to a better working relationship with government.

“The unity of the industry to show the Government we were in need has been fantastic and we’ve been able to get a very good outcome for the racing industry,” Partington said.

Top trainer Rob Heathcote, who along with Partington was the face of the campaign, said: “You have to give the Government their dues. They have reevaluated their position and listened to the industry.”ENDS

According to one report or it might have been a statement by an insider the increased prizemoney will be shared down to 10th placing which will be a big benefit for the connections of unplaced horses without which the races would generate less revenue from TAB and the tax on bookies.......already the southern trainers Chris Waller & Kris Lees  are sending their second and third stringers to race in QLD so it's likely there'll be more competition from NSW trainers once the new prizemoney is announced .

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Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-27, 06:07 PM Reply #1732 »

What is the racing world coming to?

Paying prizemoney down to 10th -- in Queensland is only likely to hasten its demise.

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Oct-27, 07:32 PM Reply #1733 »
Couldn't agree more Mair. Fundamentally stupid. It is like giving every kid who attends their school athletics competition a medal for participation. People seem to think they should be rewarded for winning and for failing. Where's the encouragement for success. ? The wind bags like Heathcote and Partington have had a win over a Racing Minister who two years ago didn't realize if you run more trains , you need more people to drive them . So they haven't really haven't had to perform in elite Company. The big losers in this "compromise " will be country racing. Racing year by year is slashing out the grassroots so those at the top of the tree can get a bigger slice of the  pie. The voter base of the Queensland government is not anchored in the bush so their view is likely to be that the electoral damage  in those areas will be minimal.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Oct-28, 01:03 AM Reply #1734 »
The old "too much prizemoney" whinge. You gotta love people scraping the bottom of the barrel for a whine.

Have you guys ever thought that the purpose of paying down to tenth is to help allay the costs of horse ownership?

Keeps more owners in the game and in spite of what you say the winners get far more than the horse running tenth.

Fantastic initiative   emthup

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« 2018-Oct-28, 04:45 AM Reply #1735 »
All,

The other reason paying to 10th is a good thing is that the punters $$$ pays for the show AND punters don't want to bet on small fields.

Peter Mair's idiocy should be pointed out for what it is - idiocy of a losing punter who does not speak for all.

Fours

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« 2018-Oct-28, 08:20 AM Reply #1736 »
Strike action leads to a win-win for all



MISSION ACCOMPLISHED: Empty stands at Doomben after the meeting was cancelled yesterday. Pictu Peter Wallis

MAYBE the racing industry should have gone on strike 15 years ago?

The drastic move to take industrial action delivered Queensland’s thoroughbred participants possibly its biggest ever payday on Friday.

From a prizemoney return of nil from the initial point of consumption tax announcement, the industry’s $26 million windfall equates to pretty much the maximum thoroughbreds could have hoped for from POC, even though the new funds are said to be coming from consolidated revenue.

It is a win for standing united with a steely resolve to get an outcome for the industry.

The initial stance got the attention of the State Government and following through on the threat hastened the outcome, one which gives the industry the shot in the arm it desperately needs.

The thoroughbred alliance was able to harness the collective energy of the industry and articulate a case that gathered widespread public attention.

It should not be underestimated the role that Racing Queensland played.

While the control body took a relatively quiet public stance (which was criticised in some quarters), it was working frantically behind the scenes, providing a compelling case as to why government should invest in the industry.

Alliance members spoke glowingly of the role Brendan Parnell (pictured), Steve Wilson and Mark Sowerby played during the two marathon meetings with Jackie Trad and Stirling Hinchliffe.


RQ has been granted what it wished for and now has the platform to deliver on its strategic plan.

And what of the Labor Government?

In the space of 12 months it has now pledged an annual $17.5 million for country racing, $26 million to thoroughbreds, $20 million for harness and greyhound infrastructure and a $17 million debt writeoff. Negotiations continue on a potential shot in the arm for greyhound and harness prizemoney.

In return, it has asked for industry reform to create a sustainable future.

That type of investment is unprecedented.

While it did take extreme action to buy the industry a seat at the table, the fact the Treasurer and Racing Minister listened and acted on it should be applauded.

MOOD MORE POSITIVE

ALLIANCE spokesman Cameron Partington outlined to participants yesterday how the new prizemoney structure is set to come into effect from next Friday.

He noted a changing of the mood after Friday’s deal was announced.

“The fight to get us back to where we need to be is by no way over, but at least now we have confidence,” he said.

“Racing Queensland has some very exciting initiatives and challenging times ahead for all of us as we change and adapt our business to the ever-changing world.

“As we clearly said – fix prizemoney now, continue to look for ways to increase it to keep in touch with other states, and any challenges that come participants’ way will be much easier to accept.”

ALSO-RANS GET BOOST

THERE was no shortage of opinions as to how the new $26 million should be carved up.

The thoroughbred alliance has been adamant it first should be put into paying prizemoney down to 10th, like they are now doing in NSW. Racing Queensland is expected to confirm this position next week.


The first $18 million will cover RQ’s plans on this front and the $8 million next year could be used to top up the pointy end further.

STRIKING A BALANCE

PRIZEMONEY lost with four axed TAB meetings yesterday was $871,000, with another potential $241,000 in QTIS Bonuses. RQ will no doubt reprogram several races this week to make up for the shortfall.

That makes the strike action a pretty good investment.

There were plenty of loose figures being thrown about last week in terms of cost, including one suggestion it would cost RQ millions.

In fact, loss to RQ in terms of revenue would be negligible and quite possibly be a surplus, as it will still receive fees from UBET turnover on interstate races.

Another suggestion was that it would cost the government $10 million. Hardly, it reaps its percentage of UBET turnover as well, plus POC returns are based on revenue made by bookmakers off Queensland-based customers (regardless of which venue they are betting on). POC is not, as has widely been misunderstood, a tax on bets made on Queensland races.

WHAT ABOUT US?

THE challenge for RQ now is to deliver a similar outcome for trots and greyhounds.

After weeks of solidarity, social media was alive and well with insults flying between respective code loyalties on Friday night.

The government was clear it was only dealing with thoroughbreds on Friday, but negotiations are said to be continuing with an outcome for the other codes.


[/b]

The back story would make interesting reading...... surprising there's no mention of Gary Pemberton's recruitment and role in mediating the breakthrough meeting maybe it was RQ possibly Parnell who came up with his name .... whoever it was did good ...... paying prizemoney down to 10th will keep expenses down and will help owners stay in the game  which IMO is a good thing....it might even encourage some new faces yesterday at Randwick one of Rob Heathcote's came second earning roughly equivalent to first prize on a Saturday metro meeting in Brisbane  his other unplaced runners returned $3700 or so which they wouldn't have got up here making the trip affordable.
On the $20M for harness & greyhound infrastructure  $10M of that was promised years ago to compensate the dogs for the loss of Parklands so far the trots haven't seen anything and $20M is no where near the value lost to the two tenants when Parklands was resumed.

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« Last Edit: 2018-Oct-28, 08:24 AM by Arsenal »

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-28, 09:33 AM Reply #1737 »

Understanding the implications of the 'point of consumption' taxes

Among the many things 'racing' that I am still at a loss to understand is the consequences of POC taxes.

I gather that it applies to 'gross profits' rather than 'gross turnover' (as do the racefields levies).

Is it an additional takeout from the betting -- if so, does it reduce the fixed-odds paid and the dividends paid from tote pools.

Do the variations between states have a bearing on where bets are placed -- and thus on the conduct of TAB accounts.

Are punters well advised to register an address in the state where they want to bet?

Overall does the POC game have a bearing on which state racing industries will prosper.

[On the more general point, I am not keen on the idea that we should all own and race a horse and, collectively,  spend more of the 'taxes' raised by governments on conducting more race meetings for  more horses.]



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« 2018-Oct-28, 03:50 PM Reply #1738 »
Seems clear to me that the difficult decisions for RQ will be which non-TAB clubs are culled and which can be upgraded to TAB status to meet probable sustainability criteria likely negotiated with government. Given turnover trends favor races with 8 starters plus beware those non-TAB clubs averaging 6 starters per race or less. Your head will be on the chopping block!

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« 2018-Oct-28, 04:31 PM Reply #1739 »
In real life things are never simple . .

Don't know the average field size in Mount Isa . .

But I do know what Bob Katter's reaction will be if race meetings in his electorate are threatened  :whistle:

Offline JayDee

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« 2018-Oct-28, 05:04 PM Reply #1740 »
I can think of a few more politically unpalatable ones. Now that the industry has united for probably the first time the government no doubt would prefer it divided. Potential club closures would certainly provoke division. Just think about how Gladstone would stack up against a host of smaller towns that have superior race tracks and better stats. If i was involved at Ferguson Park i’d be worried...

Offline arthur

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« 2018-Oct-28, 06:01 PM Reply #1741 »
And apropos of nothing . . but a bit to do with paying down to tenth

The 'brains-trust' that planned the now not so new MKY track . . even though there was plenty of room . . designed it only wide enough for 8 runners to contest some of the shorter sprint trips . . and some of the longer ones if the rail is out


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« 2018-Oct-30, 09:34 AM Reply #1742 »
While RQ with the support of the licensees has managed to wrangle some $26M from the forecast $70m expected from the first year's PoC tax....IMO they have the job in front of them to make it economical to continue with the number of race meetings which don't have TAB status...... while the brains trust in the Deagon bunker are no doubt working overtime to come up with a viable model to get some revenue by converting some of the non contributor race meetings to TAB revenue earners ........no easy decision to stage meetings in the bush on the few non racing days which are left....leaving a very small window of opportunity to obtain TV coverage and punters support outside of Wednesdays Saturdays & Sundays which are fully committed.

According to the latest Australian Racing Fact Book 2017  there are 114 race clubs with  103 race tracks in QLD .

Altogether there were 700 meetings and 4606 races  contested by 7139 horses..... the number of starters was 41,219 for prize money of $98.183M plus incentives of $7.31M and other returns $12.56M. Fees paid amounted to $4.87M total returns are shown as $11.11M.

There were 433 TAB meetings and 267 Non Tab meetingsin QLD

There were  3228 TAB races with 30,455 starters while there were  1378  non TAB  races contested by 10,764 horses.

Qld has twice the number of non TAB  meetings than NSW and more than 5 times the number in Victoria while total prize money in QLD is about $100M less than NSW and about $90M less than Victoria....those figures may be out of date as the increases in NSW are probably not included.

There are 228 jockeys in QLD and 776 trainers the most successful are Tony Gollan who had 837 runners which won 107 races for $3.72M and Ben Currie who had 496 starters for 106 winners for $1.867M. It appears  there are a handful that earn a good living but I imagine many if not most are living from hand to mouth the same would apply to  jockeys apart from those who command the best rides.

Only other trainers listed in the ARFB are Matt Dunn with  555 runners for 97 winners earning $3.45M..... Toby Edmonds 394 runners for 90 winners of $3.869M and Stuart Kendrick 642 runners 89 winners for $1.91M.

Leading rider Jeff Lloyd rode 189 winners for  $7.266M..... Jim Byrne had 133 winners for  $5.558M and Robbie Fraad rode 106 winners for $3.243M.

Qld has 147 stallions compared to 215 in NSW and 162 in Victoria.

So even with the $26M promised QLD will still be well behind the major states although it will help to keep the wolf from the door I doubt that owning a city class  horse in QLD for most owners would an economic proposition with training costs from what I hear around $5K a month while the horse is in work..... trainers in the City have heavy on course stabling and daily track fees while there are the incidental expenses which all add to the owner'sbill...then there are costs of spelling and pre training which isn't cheap.

Surprisingly the number of single owners Australia wide accounts for 83% ......other ownership consists of Companies comprising 11% with Syndicates bringing up the rear on just 6%.

There are some figures on the gambling dollar which I haven't included but you can bet they'll be dropping rather than increasing as everthing indicates punters are a dying race.

Some time this week RQ isexpected to announce the new prize money distribution


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« 2018-Oct-30, 11:07 AM Reply #1743 »
Once a year meetings at the country tracks are very successful as evidenced by the Clifton Cup meeting on Saturday.
Population of Clifton is 1500 & the race crowd exceeded this number.
Eleven bookies fielded & were not frightened to take a bet.
A bet of $500 e.w.was laid on a $6 chance & it started at $5.
So there is still plenty of life in country racing.

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« 2018-Oct-30, 07:35 PM Reply #1744 »
No doubt that country meetings like Clifton are a social event which attract the locals and numbers of visitors including  trainers owners jockeys and strappers...last weekend there were 6 country meetings held in QLD....all of which had QTIS bonuses for those eligible which finished in the money.

Isisford ran 5 races with the biggest field 6 out of a total of 28 starters they raced for good money $12K for the main race others for a minimum of $7K......

Gympie also had 5 races the main race won by Fasta Than Light attracted 10 starters the Cup was worth $22K with $14K to the winner minimum money was $7K most races carried $10K all told there were 44 starters.......

Gladstone ran 5 races all worth $7K most starters were 8 in one race from a total of 35.....

.Charleville ran 5 races all worth $7K all up 35 horses faced the starter.......

Clifton ran 6 races with a minimum $7K  two races were worth $8K the Cup won by Mendelsshon was worth $10K first money was $6,5K there were 12 starters in that race  all up 55 runners......

Richmond had 5 races all worth $8K with 45 starters only one race which had 5 runners didn't provide three placed EW betting.

So RQ has to try and find an acceptable program to meet the guvment's demand that they inject some revenue from turnover on the unproductive bush meetings ...... that means giving some clubs TAB status...... but if the results from the meetings held throughout the state on Saturday are any guide RQ has the job ahead of them.

Visualise any one or more of those meetings having TAB status TV coverage and imagine how successful they would be in meeting the target the guvment has set RQ.

Giddy Up :beer:


Offline arthur

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« 2018-Oct-30, 08:55 PM Reply #1745 »
.Visualise any one or more of those meetings having TAB status TV coverage and imagine how successful they would be in meeting the target the guvment has set RQ.


And visualise them doing it on a day other Saturday . . which it would have to be under current protocols . .

And visualise these bush clubs/RQ meeting the overheads needed to bring them up to speed with TAB meeting requirements


As Arsenal points out . .

It ain't gunna happen

 And realists on the committees of the bush (volunteer) clubs don't want TAB status . . They want stability, and their four . . often less . . meetings per year

The economic rationalists from the Great(?) South-East . . where they are within comfortable driving distance of about 300 meetings p.a. (and don't attend) . . want the bush meetings shut down

If more TAB turnover is required to sustain the industry, give more meetings to the existing non-metro TAB clubs . . and let the bush clubs make their contribution to the social fabric of their communities, as they have done for th last 100 years or so

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Oct-30, 10:12 PM Reply #1746 »
Arthur you have nailed it. Used to have some respect for Steve Hewlett at 4TAB and his show but all he has done over the last few weeks is hoist his employer's flag at the great detriment to those racing people in the Country areas. Even Today we had to endure the Chairman of the Board at the BRC dribbling on about what a great deal it is for stakeholders. Given his management of the Eagle Farm fiasco you would think he should be hiding under a very large tree and keeping his thoughts to himself. Some of these clowns simply have no shame.

Offline the bishop

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« 2018-Oct-31, 12:19 PM Reply #1747 »
I've been going to country meetings since the early 1960s and 'fervently believe they are integral to the fabric of rural communities as well as playing an important part in the development of licensees (ie Peter Moodys of the world).
But the economics of country racing is certain to be an on-going issue ... who is going to continue to prop them up?
John Messara's report to NZ Racing is sobering ... he has recommended 20 of 48 clubs be closed and they are not all bush outposts.
It is worth a look...

Offline arthur

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« 2018-Oct-31, 01:32 PM Reply #1748 »
Well if country racing is a drain on finances . .

Where does that 'agreement' sit???

It was weighted towards turnover from the pari-mutuel and away from the 'fixed' turnover . . when everyone (apart from the RQ negotiators, it seems) knew, and commonsense dictated that the trend was, and would continue to be the other way around

And who (apart from the RQ negotiators) would lock in any kind of commercial agreement for 30 years

And where does the TWBA turf/cushion/turf debacle sit???

And . .

No . . I won't mention EF

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Oct-31, 07:40 PM Reply #1749 »
The Bishop; fancy quoting John Messara. As  Kenny Callander used to say " once you get the greedy breeders involved it all becomes about the dollars and cents for themselves " And guess who just happens to be Messara's nodding head ; none other than the "parrot" himself. Ignore these  clowns , they couldn't give the proverbial flying .... about country racing and its impact on rural communities. The Queensland government has little to lose by putting a knife into Country Racing. Outside the South East and the larger Regional Cities there is nothing in it for them . And they know it .



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