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The New Improved Racing Queensland 2015 - ? - Qld Gallops - Racehorse TALK

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« 2018-Oct-07, 12:59 PM Reply #1675 »
THE VERDICT Nathan Exelby SM
Industry united in battle for fair deal

THE overwhelming outcome from the hysteria of the past week surrounding point of consumption allocations is one of unification within the racing industry.

Calling for strike action is a dramatic move by any measure, but no one has broken ranks and the feeling at Doomben yesterday was one of steely resolve.

If the State Government anticipates the anger of the past week to die down, they would be mistaken.

The industry has vowed to maintain the rage and support continues to roll in from all quarters.

Gold Coast Turf Club, which hosts Queensland’s richest race day, joined the chorus yesterday.

“There is a massive lack of investment, commitment and understanding of what this industry is about, what it supports,” Gold Coast Turf Club chairman Brett Cook (pictured) said.

“This is the industry that provides jobs and generates millions of dollars in tourism each year but the Government just expects the industry to cop it.”

It had been hoped racing would snare $35 million from the new tax.

The Government has argued that’s what they delivered. But industry reps yesterday described the $17 million portion of the “allocation” as “Monopoly money” that is simply a paper shift.

What the industry needs, to keep pace with what’s happened across the border, is a cash injection to prizemoney and they came up with a doughnut.

The Government is set to lay the blame for the industry’s plight on RQ and others, without realising the damage this has done.

This is where Racing Queensland, being so intrinsically linked to government, lets the industry down.

RQ’s release last week off the back of the POC snub was limp.

RQ “acknowledged the Government’s willingness to engage on this critical issue”.

How exactly did they engage?

Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe offered zip throughout the entire process and deserved to be called out for refusing to make a public case for the industry.

Treasurer Jackie Trad went full bore on implementing the (equal) highest POC rate in the country – a move that will inevitably shaft punters and jeopardise future returns to RQ – while at the same time offering little in return.

In the case of the thoroughbred code, which is responsible for 77 per cent of RQ revenue, it received a big fat zero.

It has been said by some that this could be “a death knell” for the industry.

It remains to be seen whether the outrage coming from racing circles will force a rethink within government and provide a second bite of the cherry. An industry already behind the eight-ball has had its problems exacerbated by what is effectively a nil return from POC. “You can’t have a structural disadvantage at both levels. There are only so many levers you can pull. This is one we need to win,” an RQ insider said.

PUNTERS TO PAY PRICE

AS THE racing industry rallies for a bigger return, punters should not be overlooked in the POC saga.

With Queensland locked into a 15 per cent fee (compared to 8 per cent in Victoria and 10 per cent in NSW), bookmakers and wagering providers have indicated the costs will be passed on to punters in a bid to keep their businesses viable.

Betfair revealed the new tax means it will be forking out 66 per cent of its gross revenue, forcing a price change.

Queensland residents will have discounts capped at 40 per cent compared to 60 per cent for jurisdictions that don’t have a POC, meaning Queenslanders could pay up to 50 per cent more commission with the exchange.

Ladbrokes Australia boss Jason Scott said “at some stage it will be passed on at the bowser”.

He tipped turnover to reduce, which will then lead to diminished returns to Racing Queensland.

“Queensland is worse-placed of all, with its Government going for a 15 per cent tax, which makes it even more heinous that it’s not going back to the Queensland racing industry,” he said.

He said RQ “didn’t help themselves” by pushing for a return from POC but not addressing the high tax rate.ENDS

Another pressure piece yesty in the CM from Nathan Exelby .

Goose will be cooked
NATHAN EXELBY
RACING EDITOR
 
CONTROVERSY: Jackie Trad.

Racing industry unites against State Government’s stance on tax

AUSTRALIA’S peak industry representative body has warned state Treasurer Jackie Trad she is potentially killing the goose that lays the golden egg if she refuses to revisit her stance on point of consumption tax distributions.

It follows the extraordinary decision by representative bodies in Queensland to launch strike action this month if the Government refuses to budge on its offer.
Aushorse is the marketing body of the Australian thoroughbred industry and chief executive Tom Reilly said Queensland was a vital part of the national racing ecosystem, but it needed support to ensure its long-term viability.

“If the Queensland racing and breeding industry doesn’t get an outcome from the point of consumption tax that is at least as good as the deal NSW and Victoria have done, the challenges to the state will be insurmountable,” Reilly said.

“This new revenue is money that is generated 100 per cent from racing (excluding the sport component). It’s only common sense the Government needs to support that industry to ensure that revenue stream continues on. Jackie Trad’s announcement last weekend is a case of trying to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.

“The industry in Queensland is already behind the eight-ball and is just looking for a fair cut.

“Queensland is a massive part of the Australian racing and breeding industry and the whole national industry needs Queensland to be strong.”
Few issues have united the state’s industry like this one.

Queensland Racehorse Owners Association president Vince Pennisi said the racing industry was a major contributor to the economy and provided widespread employment and financial benefits to the state, but had been “left to struggle for its survival”.

“We are not being given sufficient recognition and are being treated with disdain,” Pennisi said. “The industry has been forced to take strike action which is a last resort in order to be heard in an abyss of lethargy.”

A response from a Government spokesman refuted the industry had been blindsided and suggested there would be little left over after the grant of $20 million for new harness and greyhound infrastructure projects and the decision to “forgive $17.8 million of debt owed by Racing Queensland” to government.

“These two measures alone mean the Palaszczuk Government will be returning most of the POC tax to the racing industry this financial year,” the spokesman said.

“While we understand the industry is concerned about future years, extensive consultation will be undertaken in the lead-up to subsequent state budgets.

“The action threatened by the industry’s representative bodies regarding stoppages or any other such changes will only hurt the punters and their own industry participants.
“There are clearly significant concerns and we will continue to talk with industry about them and explore ways the Government can continue to help.”ENDS

And the campaign against Trad by funding the Greens seems to have floundered with the high minded Greens refusing to accept any donations from the racing industry ..there's nothing to stiop the Racing Industry finding a local candidate to stand as an Independant which if the recruit has the right connections he/she could determine the outcome of the election.

Race lobby gears up to topple Trad

DES HOUGHTON NATHAN EXELBY

POWERFUL thoroughbred racing groups have launched a fighting fund to oust Deputy Premier Jackie Trad from her South Brisbane seat.

Associations representing owners, trainers and jockeys say they will raise $200,000 to support a Greens candidate to topple Ms Trad after the industry was snubbed in the State Government’s point of consumption tax announcement last weekend.

A spokesman for the organisers said Ms Trad and Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk had betrayed racing and were perceived to be hostile to the “sport of kings”.

Queensland introduced a point of consumption tax on October 1. Bookmakers and wagering providers will be taxed 15 per cent of all revenue generated from Queensland-based customers. It is significantly higher than the 8 per cent and 10 per cent being introduced in Victoria and NSW.

Ladbrokes Australia chief executive Jason Scott said the tax would make most bookmakers non-commercial, which in turn would cost punters.

Amy MacMahon of the Queensland Greens said the party would reject any donation from the racing industry lobby.ENDS


And the campaign against Trad by funding the Greens seems to have floundered with the high minded Greens refusing to accept any donations from the racing industry ..there's nothing to stiop the Racing Industry finding a local candidate to stand as an Independant which if the recruit has the right connections he/she could determine the outcome of the election....and good bye Jackie....still that won't solve the issue of the PoC tax but I imagine it would be very satisfying to the organisers.


Giddy Up :beer:


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« 2018-Oct-08, 09:50 AM Reply #1676 »
Industry in dire straits
NATHAN EXELBY
RACING EDITOR
 
FRUSTRATED: Chris Munce.
RACING Minister Stirling Hinchliffe is set to cut short his holiday to meet an alliance of thoroughbred representatives tomorrow, with the group seeking a commitment of money that can immediately be used to boost prizemoney.

Members from each of the four bodies representing jockeys, trainers, owners and breeders will meet the Minister and they have also requested that State Treasurer Jackie Trad and Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk attend.

It is uncertain yet whether any representatives from Racing Queensland will be there.

The Minister has been advised that the only way to halt planned industrial action will be with a “satisfactory financial injection immediately into prizemoney”, along with continuing commitments.

Former champion jockey Chris Munce, now president of the state branch of the Australian Trainers’ Association, hopes the Government will realise how dire the situation has become in Queensland.

“It seems to me (the Government) just want mediocre racing up here where we are racing for ribbons,” he said.

“They have to come back with something for us.

‘‘I just hope they can see what a dire situation we are in.

“It’s got to the point now, with the other states going so well, that it’s almost impossible to run a business and survive here. It’s just so expensive for owners to race here by way of prizemoney comparisons.

“If nothing happens, businesses are just going to shut down.”

Multiple premiership-winning rider Larry Cassidy said jockeys would remain 100 per cent behind the industry’s planned industrial action if nothing changed in the next fortnight.

“There’s disappointment and frustration across the whole industry about the result given to them,” Cassidy said.

The already flagging industry is seeking a cash injection from point of consumption receipts.

The tax is expected to have a detrimental effect on existing wagering returns to the industry.

Racing Queensland chief executive Brendan Parnell conceded the introduction of the tax would affect overall revenue returned to the control body, over and above the “make good” aspect of the POC deal, pointing to South Australia (which led the country in introducing this tax) as an example.

“I don’t believe it will be as extreme as it was in South Australia, because there are significantly more customers in Queensland, but we are expecting a downturn because of it,” Parnell said.

“This will do damage and the finances will be impacted.

“The timing is also very poor for Queensland.

“The next three months are the biggest betting months of the year and we are now an outlier, because NSW and Victoria’s POC doesn’t come in until January 1.”ENDS

Davie Fowler interviewed RQ CEO Brendan Parnell on Press Room today very interesting discussion it was ..... Parnell not sure if he'll be included in tomorrow's mediation with Hinchy..."it'll be up to the Minister:" he said... Hinchy would be a mug if he goes in without Parnell who will be the smartest man in the room ...has all the facts at his fingertips and is clear and concise when he opens his mouth.

Today Davie floated whether the $17.8M which the guvment has written off RQ's debt could be diverted to prizemoney to avert the proposed strike action ...as Nathan Exelby pointed out this is an accounting issue not real money ..so that wouldn't fly IMO......can't imagine Annastacia or Trad turning up Trad would be a hindrance rather than a help IMO better off without her ..she's out of step with the southern states on the PoC 15% instead of only 8% and 10% plus it started in Qld on 1st October but not due in NSW and Victoria until 1st January.
Parnell made the point that RQ has increased driving fees for Harness Racing most of whom earn less than $30K while only 2/3 of jockeys earn more than $50K ......he did say the prudent steps have been taken (by Trad) as 50% 0f bets from Qld punters were not being taxed in QLD ..the $17.6M reserved for country racing ends in 2021.

Hopefully tomorrow's meeting will result in some positives although I can't imagine Hinchy will be able to promise anything more than he'll report their concerns to guvment and will come back to them.

If the strike cannot be averted ......who exactly will be the target .......Guvment is the enemy but their loss is likely to be minimal....punters will still bet on the major interstate meetings...owners will still have to pay training fees....jockeys won't earn they are independent contractors and are unlikely to suffer any repercussions from QRIC  ...the TAB will lose revenue on local races but punters will likely bet more on NSW & Vic...this is resembling a Secondary Boycott which the injured parties could possibly seek injunctive relief ...although I doubt for what's involved any body would go down that track just an opinion which could be wide of the mark......would be interesting though if it eventuated.

Giddy Up :beer:


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Oct-08, 01:52 PM Reply #1677 »
The government forgets about all that tax revenue they have collected over the years and the requirement for them to plough some back in to protect the investment from time to time.

Hope they can get something out of the tight arses before any strike action is necessary.   emthup

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« 2018-Oct-09, 02:54 PM Reply #1678 »
IIgnore racing and falter at the polls

FOR the past 20 years, 18 of them under Labor, the State Government has abandoned racing in Queensland because it doesn’t understand the industry, or even worse, it doesn’t care.

They’ve allowed bureaucrats to sabotage the wagering and infrastructure models, and starved the industry of funds to compete with the southern states. And the result – talks of strike action, a crisis meeting today between Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe and key stakeholders and our reputation in tatters.

This is the fault of the State Government. And to be fair to the Labor Government, the Coalition buggered it up as well during its brief time in office. They can spin this debacle all they want, but the reality is that the buck stops with the decision-makers – politicians.

They sign the cheques. This row has been brewing for some time, but the latest imbroglio on the Point of Consumption tax is the icing on an ugly cake. Not only does Treasurer Jackie Trad want to tax corporate bookies in Queensland at 15 per cent, compared to 8 and 10 per cent in NSW and Victoria, she wants to give nothing back of the $100 million a year it will raise.

Just bank it to hire more public servants. In Victoria and NSW, the Government will divert about $40 million a year from its POC tax back to prizemoney. In Queensland, we have consistently appointed ministers who haven’t got the courage to stand up to Treasury boffins and demand appropriate funding. That’s why the industry has had enough and on the two biggest race days of the year – Cox Plate and Melbourne Cup – will strike at Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Toowoomba.

That will cost owners, trainers and jockeys money, and the Government will lose millions in wagering revenue. Here’s what’s happened in Queensland over the past decade:

In 2008, Queensland prizemoney levels were at 75 per cent of NSW. Five years ago that figure was 63 per cent. It now stands at 45 per cent;

In 2008, there were 104 stallions standing at stud in Queensland. Five years ago, there were 51 stallions. Today, there are 30; In 2008, there were 5124 mares mated in Queensland.
Five years ago, that figure dropped to 3526. In the 2017/18 financial year, there were 2438 mares mated. There’s a trend here that suggests people are getting out of the industry because prizemoney levels are falling and not as many horses are being bred.

And now this Government wants to widen the gap between ourselves and the southern states. If they were fair dinkum, they’d be putting the entire POC windfall into an industry that employs 43,000 people and contributes $1.2 billion to the economy annually.

Steve Morley is from Glenlogan Stud, which up until March last year was the state’s most successful thoroughbred stud farm. He says that “after years of incompetence and neglect from Government, we decided to restructure our business and concentrate wholly on NSW and Victoria rather than having any Queensland flavour’’. They stopped standing stallions and downsized. Having had an annual spend of over $12 million a year and employing 50 people, they now have just six employees and their local spend is now $3 million. The decision, says Morley, was heartbreaking. He said the Government’s inability to recognise the worth of racing to Queensland is “incomprehensible and nothing short of embarrassing”.

Furthermore, in a letter to sent to Hinchliffe six weeks ago, the South East Country Racing Association believes the Queensland Racing Integrity Commission, which employs 120 staff and has an annual budget of $30 million, should be wound back, and, in fact, has called for the sacking of its commissioner, Ross Barnett. They say QRIC has left the industry “disillusioned and mistrustful’’ and racing stewards should go back under the control of Racing Queensland.

Participant bodies representing the harness and greyhound industries share similar beliefs. These are strong demands from stakeholders and what they reflect is an industry that feels under siege from not only the Government, but the regulatory bodies.

Racing in Queensland needs a new business model. It needs to be separated from meddling politicians and bureaucrats, and run like NSW and Victoria, with a firm hand and an entrepreneurial spirit.

Right now, it is drowning under the weight of apathy and a State Treasurer who thinks people who go to the races are millionaires who sip Moet and smoke cigars. Most people who have a punt are traditional Labor voters.

This Cabinet needs to get out more. I’ll hand out how-to-vote cards for the Greens if one MP can walk into a TAB and successfully fill out a ticket for a multi-leg all up. They don’t understand it, so they don’t want to know. Rail fails, childabuse scandals, cosy relations with union thugs, a waste-levy tax, CCC dramas ... abandoning racing is the issue that will hurt Labor most at the ballot box.

What they reflect is an industry under siege.ENDS

Peter Gleeson's column in the CM today

The figures in bold type show how far the racing industry has fallen over the past 10years ........for the guvment to rethink the PoC would be a start... I think Gleeson is overstating the projected loss of revenue to the guvment if the strike goes ahead...punters will bet on the big meetings down south...the loss to the guvment on local races would IMO be minimal.......the South East Country racing Assn's call for a return of integrity functions from QRIC to RQ is a backward step IMO and won't get to first base and what would be the point in sacking QRIC commissioner Ross Barnett...just a lot of fluff from a body that nobody has ever heard of...which   hasn't done anything constructive and demands the return to the old ways which didn't work as the MacSporran Inquiry found.

Giddy Up :beer:

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« 2018-Oct-09, 03:07 PM Reply #1679 »
Hard hitting story from racing website LGHR that a better target for any strike would be the MM at the Gold Coast

"IF RACING STAKEHOLDERS WANT TO GET THEIR MESSAGE ACROSS THEN TARGET MAGIC MILLIONS WEEK WITH STRIKE ACTION NOT CUP DAY

WITH Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe ordered to cut short his holiday and meet with an alliance of thoroughbred representatives to discuss an immediate boost to prizemoney for Queensland gallops we saw the need to advance the WEDNESDAY WHINGE to get this message across before a band-aid cure is offered and accepted.

IF the Queensland thoroughbred industry wants to retaliate to its perceived Point of Consumption Tax snub one could argue that strike action on Melbourne Cup day is not the most effective means of protest.

Their stance needs to be more united – taking in the entire industry and trade unions associated with its workforce BUT it should target Magic Millions week instead, which would damage the Labor Government much more.

Who will suffer if industry participants, including trainers, jockey and breeders stand down from ONLY the meetings at Doomben, Gold Coast and Toowoomba on Cox Plate Day and Melbourne Cup Day?

Only the clubs involved and let’s face it the racing at each venue on the first Tuesday in November is merely a sideshow to the main event at Flemington. If those three clubs don’t host a race meeting of their own on that day will they still be permitted to hold phantom meetings? Such a refusal would cost the reportedly financially embattled Brisbane Racing Club one of its biggest windfalls of the year. It’s a case of shooting yourself in the foot.

It will hardly make a difference to the public who will find another venue – such as a Cup day race meeting elsewhere or the local pub or club to patronize. And as for betting revenue that would have been held on the Queensland racing, well it would arguably be more than swallowed up by the big meeting in Melbourne which will attract the lion’s share of turnover on the TAB and with the corporate bookies in any case.

So, at the end of the day, whilst it might attract attention to the plight of the local industry in the Government’s Point of Consumption Tax decision, the strike will have little to no effect.

However, if the industry made a united stance and brought to a standstill Magic Millions week – the milking cow of one of Australia’s most influential men – in racing and politics – now that would drive a dagger into the heart of the Labor Government.

Imagine if the POC protest strike saw the richest race meeting in Queensland stopped because trainers and jockeys refused to participate. Imagine if the MM Sales were halted because breeders refused to present their yearlings for auction or unions associated with racing prevented the sales from proceeding.

‘Genial’ Gerry Harvey has already shown the political clout he has with racing officialdom in Queensland and Governments of all persuasions gaining millions of taxpayer dollars to support a private enterprise company simply because he threatened to move it away from the Gold Coast. Those involved soon produced figures to support how much the Magic Millions was worth to the tourist and racing revenue of Queensland when effectively it is the peak season on the glitter strip and the majority of the horses sold come from interstate studs and aren’t bought by Queenslanders.

IF the industry in Queensland is serious about a strike that will be effective they must target Magic Millions day instead of Melbourne Cup or Cox Plate by only a handful of major clubs backed by key bodies. The question is will certain groups, especially the breeders, be as outspoken in their criticism of the POC decision and the Government if it means offending or jeopardizing their cosy relationship with Genial Gerry. We suspect this suggestion – which is an absolute winner – won’t get off the ground and that ‘sweet talking’ Sterling will come up with an instant solution that the industry will swallow regarding prizemoney.

Imagine Premier Anastasia, Treasurer Jackie or Racing Minister Sterling – whose fleeting race day appearances are spearheaded with their noses in the trough during Millions week – faced such an embarrassing confrontation with their mate Gerry or the MM hierarchy.

That aside, it is time that the industry sought an explanation from the Government over the POC distribution fudging of the figures. Don’t expect this to be sought by the weak-kneed control body – after all they were appointed by the Government and aren’t likely to ask too many tough questions.

Commenting on the proposed strike action, a Government spokesman told The Courier-Mail that there will be little left over of the $70 million in revenue from the first year of the Point of Consumption Tax after a grant of $20million for new harness and greyhound infrastructure projects and the decision to forgive $17.8 million of debt owed by Racing Queensland.

When we went to school $37.8 million from $70 million left $32.2 million – if that in the eyes of the Government is ‘little’ then the racing prizemoney coffers can do with plenty of it to help bridge the ever widening gap between Queensland and the southern States. And what’s the bet that’s the pot the solution to the strike threat will come from?

The Government spokesman sounded like Pinocchio when he went on to say: “These two measures alone mean the Palaszczuk Government will be returning most of the POC tax to the racing industry this financial year. The action threatened by the industry’s representative bodies regarding stoppages or any other such changes will only hurt the punters and their own industry participants.”

How can it possibly hurt the punters? They will just invest their hard-earned at other venues than racing in Queensland. And as for the industry participants they are already the big losers – putting on the show for the Government to raise hundreds of millions now through a dud TAB deal before we even mention the POC without putting money earnt by racing back into racing. It’s a farce that never would have occurred in the days of Russ Hinze and Bob Gibbs as Racing Ministers. And don’t let the LNP tell you things would be different under them.

As prominent Downs racing identity Peter Bredhauer commented to punters.com: The only ray of hope for racing in Queensland is to somehow get it devoid of politics. The current mob of politicians from both sides of Parliament wouldn’t know how to run a chook raffle let alone an industry like racing. If you want to stuff anything up just get politicians involved.”

Peter Moody, a passionate Queensland racing supporter, hit the nail on the head when he told The Courier-Mail:   

‘Don’t forget the fact that if the Government don’t have the confidence in the governance of racing to do the right thing with that money, and they look at some of the monumental stuff-ups – ie Eagle Farm – of recent times, racing is probably not promoting itself to say ‘hey give us the money we can do the right thing’.

“But at the end of the day, the Government can’t have the cake and eat it as well. They appoint the people to run racing.

“It’s a bit of a catch-22 but the end result is we do not want to see Queensland lagging further and further behind. Unfortunately, Queensland racing has been seen to be a political hot cake for many decades now.”

Treasurer Jackie has been warned from many influential quarters that ‘she is potentially killing the goose that lays the golden egg if she refuses to revisit her stance on POC Tax distributions.’

Tom Reilly, CEO of Aushorse, the marketing body of the Australian thoroughbred industry, sees Queensland as a vital part of the national racing ecosystem, but warns that it needs support to ensure its long term viability.

“If the Queensland racing and breeding industry doesn’t get an outcome from the POC Tax that is at least as good as the deal New South Wales and Victoria have done, the challenges to the State will be insurmountable,” Reilly said.

“This new revenue is money that is generated 100 per cent from racing (excluding the sport component). It’s only common sense the government needs to support that industry to ensure that revenue stream continues on.

“Jackie Tradd’s announcement last weekend is a case of trying to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. The industry in Queensland is already behind the eight-ball and is just looking for a fair cut.”

A clear indication of the difference between racing in Brisbane and that in Sydney and especially Melbourne can be seen at any feature Saturday meeting. When the cameras swing to the winning connections after a race there are next to none to be seen in Queensland while in Victoria there are massive groups embracing, jumping up and down and celebrating the success.

Sadly, because the likes of Trad only attend big days like the Magic Millions and Stradbroke, they probably think that the majority of winning owners of big races in this country are the rich and famous, like the Sheiks and the millionaire breeders. In fact syndicates of mum and dad owners are starting to emerge but not in Brisbane because it costs just as much to get involved here as Melbourne where the return is greater and continues to grow courtesy of racing administrations and Governments who recognize the need to invest through prizemoney as well as infrastructure.

Sadly greed will continue to gut the gallops industry in Queensland while the ‘red hots’ gets more than its rightful share because of political pressures and people influencing the decision making process who don’t have the best interests of racing at heart." ENDS


Giddy Up :beer:   


 

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« 2018-Oct-09, 06:30 PM Reply #1680 »
Qld considers racing demands after meeting
Posted by: AAP+ at 6:36pm on 9/10/2018
Posted in: Horse Racing News
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The Queensland government is considering demands from the racing industry over the state’s new gambling tax.

Stirling Hinchliffe and Treasurer Jackie Trad both met with thoroughbred racing officials on Tuesday, amid threats to strike on Cox Plate and Melbourne Cup day unless money from the new tax is directed back to the industry.

Labor’s point of consumption tax means betting houses with headquarters overseas or interstate must now pay 15 per cent tax on all bets placed in the state.

NSW has introduced the tax at 10 per cent while Victoria has it at eight per cent, with both of those state’s allocating a portion of the earnings to roll back into the racing industry.

Queensland instead is offering a new greyhound track and another for harness racing, collectively worth $20 million and funded by the tax.

The racing industry wants a portion of the funds to be used to fund extra prize money for thoroughbred racing on an ongoing basis.

In a media release an alliance of Queensland racing organisations said it had been given the opportunity to present its case to government.

“We were given every opportunity to express our message, and that we did in a very robust, passionate and constructive way,” the alliance said..

“Our mission was to ensure the government was fully informed on the current state of thoroughbred racing, a situation worsening by the day over recent years as the gap to the two market leader states NSW and Victoria continues to widen at an alarming rate.”

The government is understood to be considering the issue but hasn’t given a deadline for when it will make a decision.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk earlier on Tuesday said she believed the state’s racing industry was already well-funded.

“Let me be very clear, the racing industry has had a large amount of money from my government for infrastructure across the state,” Ms Palaszczuk said

But the premier said she was confident Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe could work out a deal with the industry.ENDS


The $20m set aside for harness and greyhound tracks includes the $10M previously promised to the greyhounds for the loss of Parklands where they were joint tenants with the GCHRC which hasn't had any compensation so the $20M is really only $10M new money ....$20M  apparently  is  what the guvment regards as the cost of replacing Parklands for both codes  which I doubt is any where near its real value. :o


Giddy Up :beer:



Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-09, 06:49 PM Reply #1681 »


A little ray of sunshine

It would be entirely sensible if the governments of Queensland and South Australia are thinking that it would be best if their local racing industries were best amalgamated with Victoria and NSW respectively.

............chucking more money down the wells is not sensible.

Imagine the net benefit of taking taxes, mainly on races run elsewhere, from bets placed by residents.

RVL and RNSW would both be scheduling races in both these states at time likely to be commercially viable.

Online arthur

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« 2018-Oct-09, 08:14 PM Reply #1682 »
Great suggestion . .

Sounds to me like that 'hospital without patients' that worked so well on the "Yes Minister" show





Although, the Qld Govt's 'Taxation Without Representation' intransigence, doesn't actually sound all that bright either  :chin:

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-09, 08:32 PM Reply #1683 »

Game over

It is not too mentally demanding to realize that the 'too much' racing in Australia is about to be dealt with.

RVL and RNSW are now including SA and Qld racing on their primary telecasts.

RVL and RNSW have both moved to collar the national market -- and to relegate others.

States are moving to protect their 'take' from the gambling of 'residents' with 'poc' taxes but this will not last long --  open accounts with the help of 'residents' in Victoria and NSW.

The adjustment will be disruptive and affected state governments should be moving quickly to put in place plans to compensate those racing participants being displaced.

The compensation will be financed from the 'take' from betting with local TAB agencies.




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« 2018-Oct-10, 09:05 AM Reply #1684 »
Great suggestion . .

Sounds to me like that 'hospital without patients' that worked so well on the "Yes Minister" show





Although, the Qld Govt's 'Taxation Without Representation' intransigence, doesn't actually sound all that bright either  :chin:


Good one arthur  :lol:


Giddy Up :beer:

Online arthur

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« 2018-Oct-10, 09:16 AM Reply #1685 »
Careful . .

You'll upset jfc

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-10, 09:21 AM Reply #1686 »
CM today an update on the earlier bulletin yesty..... some whose who who were there but not much more......no info on when  the guvment's decision on the reasonable requests  for a fair deal might be forthcoming  ..........never leave a meeting without a firm  indication of when a decision would be made......if a compromise wasn't offered at the time to resolve the issue.......a game of cat and mouse......not a good idea IMO  to strike on Cox Plate day or worse still to pick Cup day ...the biggest losers won't be the guvment but the strikers if it goes ahead they'll  make their point but lose in the process...they'll be the biggest losers.

Strike bid alliance gets a fair hearing
MARK OBERHARDT

THE racing alliance which is threatening strike action at two major meetings believes it has had a fair hearing at a meeting with the Queensland Government.

But the alliance – made up of trainers, jockeys, owners and breeders – says the fate of the proposed strike remains in the hands of the Government and racing officials.

The group is protesting against a general lack of support for racing from the Government and the recent distribution of a new point of consumption tax.

The alliance is demanding the Government allocate POC money to improved prizemoney and has threatened strike action on Cox Plate day (October 27) and Melbourne Cup day (November 6).

It had a two-hour meeting yesterday with Deputy Premier Jackie Trad, Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe and their associated staff.

Also at the meeting were Racing Queensland chairman Steve Wilson, chief executive Brendan Parnell and Thoroughbred Board representative Mark Sowerby.

In a media release the alliance said it had been given the opportunity to present its case, air its frustrations and concerns, and seek explanations from the Government.

“We were given every opportunity to express our message, and that we did in a very robust, passionate and constructive way,” it said.

“Our mission was to ensure the Government was fully informed on the current state of thoroughbred racing, a situation worsening by the day over recent years as the gap to the two market leader states NSW and Victoria continues to widen at an alarming rate.

“It is a situation that can only be contained by an immediate boost of confidence to our industry in the form of increase of returns back to participants via prizemoney.”


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Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-10, 07:34 PM Reply #1687 »


....... why chuck money down a well............... let RQL get some sponsors ...... or not.

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Oct-10, 07:43 PM Reply #1688 »
Much has been spoken by various vested interests in Queensland Racing over the last few days. The general impression created is that Queensland Racing is on the skids according to various trainers , owners , breeders, jockeys , media commentators etc. If this was all true then why has a successful operation like the Waller Stable set up a satellite stable ? Why is Kris Lees about to join him ; and reportedly the Snowdens are looking as well. Maybe the pot boilers amongst these Queensland trainers should start looking in their own backyards rather than continually expecting the taxpayers to fund their businesses. It might be getting a bit tough for a few of them

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Oct-10, 10:11 PM Reply #1689 »
Much has been spoken by various vested interests in Queensland Racing over the last few days. The general impression created is that Queensland Racing is on the skids according to various trainers , owners , breeders, jockeys , media commentators etc. If this was all true then why has a successful operation like the Waller Stable set up a satellite stable ? Why is Kris Lees about to join him ; and reportedly the Snowdens are looking as well. Maybe the pot boilers amongst these Queensland trainers should start looking in their own backyards rather than continually expecting the taxpayers to fund their businesses. It might be getting a bit tough for a few of them

So I take it you are from Queensland gunbower?

You are saying that they do not need to give the racing industry any money from the Point Of Consumption Tax component gotten from racing?

FWIW I think now is the time for those with an interest in seeing the Qld racing industry do well over the longer term to lobby the government strongly to be paid a regular percentage of what the government collects annually from POC.

Don't see any problem with that whatsoever. In fact I see a problem if nothing is done by the "pot boilers" at this point of time.

Apart from the Eagle Farm fiasco (for which I blame the tight arsed government directly), I agree that Qld racing isn't doing that badly but that shouldn't be an excuse for not seeking some extra money from the new revenue source the government is getting from racing (indirectly via punters).

Costs are rising all the time and it is an expensive business putting on the show.

Offline JayDee

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« 2018-Oct-11, 06:19 AM Reply #1690 »
Gunbower, regardless of any southern trainer influx for whatever reason a tax on racing should go back to racing. And 77% of the tax raised is generated from wagering on thoroughbred racing yet they got nothing. IMO turnover will decline once the corporates ‘penalise’ the qld industry via higher percentage markets, less promotion, less sponsorship and reduced betting promos. Ubet are intent on promoting the fixed odds operation rather than the parimutuel option due to the deal done with the Dixon board where they pay substantially less to the government and industry on that product.  Already the state government earns $80m plus via ‘taxng’ the industry and this further revenue grab is simply unpalatable to the industry. Metro prizemoney from fallen from 75% of NSW & Vic to 45%. TAB Clubs are underfunded by RQ with many in precarious financial positions. Our jockeys are the second worst paid in the country. Ownership leakage to the other states is growing. The POC tax on racing should be benefitting the 42000 racing participants in Qld not government projects or budget black holes. Few issues have ever galvanised the Qld racing industry but this one has achieved that and i for one will support any industrial action to protest Tradd’s idealogical distaste for our great game.
« Last Edit: 2018-Oct-11, 06:22 AM by JayDee »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-12, 08:05 PM Reply #1691 »
Queensland racing left behind as Victorians show how to splash the cash
NATHAN EXELBY, RACING EDITOR, The Courier-Mail
October 11, 2018 9:12pm
IN THE space of 24 hours this week, the stark differences in methodology and attitudes ­toward racing between two state Labor governments was beautifully and brutally illustrated, depending on which state you reside in.

On Tuesday, a contingent of thoroughbred representatives from Queensland faced Treasurer Jackie Trad and Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe asking, begging, for a bigger slice of point of consumption tax revenues.

The argument was simple: without this money coming back to racing, given it will be generated by betting on racing, the industry faces an almost untenable future in the face of burgeoning war chests being built south of the border.

They were told the Government had become tired of racing “putting its hand out”.

Fast forward to Wednesday night and Victoria’s Racing Minister Martin Pakula, a fierce advocate for the industry, announced a $33 million package to be put into prizemoney for Victorian Racing.


Queensland deputy premier and treasurer Jackie Trad. Pictu AAP
Pakula noted the investment was to safeguard thousands of jobs and grow the state’s $3.2 billion industry.

The cash boost will push prizemoney on the 550 race meetings run in Victoria just past NSW, which distributes $260 million across 700 meetings.

Queensland has a similar number of thoroughbred meetings to NSW, but had just $105 million to share to its participants.

Earlier in the year, Pakula and the Victorian Government adopted the country’s most competitive point of consumption tax – 8 per cent – knowing the higher the price, the more damage it potentially could do to wagering growth.

Queensland didn’t budge on a national equal-high of 15 per cent.

There is yet to be an acknowledgment this price point puts at risk returns to Racing Queensland and limits its ability to charge more for its product.

The door remains ajar though.


Victoria’s racing minister Martin Pakula. Pictu Aaron Francis
The alliance of thoroughbred representatives hope Racing Queensland and the Government can negotiate a palatable solution for the industry, and on Thursday night agreed to put industrial action on hold as those negotiations continue.

Alliance spokesman Cameron Partington said the group was pleased the Government had listened and recognised its concerns and was hopeful of achieving a positive outcome.

“Our goal from the outset has been to obtain a better deal for the thoroughbred racing industry, a deal which can restore confidence through an immediate boost on returns to participants through prizemoney increases,” he said.

“While we await (the Government’s) response, we will put a hold on our plans for industrial action in the short term, provided an acceptable agreement for recurring returns to industry participants can be achieved.”

Amid the uncertainty in Queensland, the West Australian Government this week committed 35 per cent of proceeds from an estimated $500 million privatisation of its TAB to the racing industry for infrastructure funds.

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Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-12, 08:17 PM Reply #1692 »


Why is anyone talking about a future for racing in Queensland?

..... at best RNSW will manage some traditional events over May and June.......... someone will eventually relocate the MM circus to Sydney.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-15, 01:34 PM Reply #1693 »
A truce has been called between the racing industry participants the 4 of them and the guvment to allow the latter to reconsider their position on the issues facing the industry raised after the PoC delivered nil benefits to the stake holders......the harness and greyhounds spokes persons have kept a discreet silence but no doubt will be expecting to receive some benefits once and if  the guvment decides fair is fair.

State’s racing industry has copped it for too long

QUEENSLAND racing has reached the point of no return. If it does not stand its ground in its war with the State Government, the industry will go to seed. Will it die? No. Racing is a resilient beast. It will stagger on regardless. But already the three racing codes in Queensland are running on fumes while their southern counterparts thrive. Without further action, they will sink further into the dark abyss. The Queensland galloping industry threatened to strike unless the Government reconsidered its controversial move to introduce a 15 per cent point of consumption betting tax (NSW is 10 per cent and Victoria 8 per cent) and, unlike the southern states who redirect a significant percentage into prizemoney, use much of it for other projects. The threat has been withdrawn amid expectations that a better deal is coming but the racing fraternity must be wary about vague, shallow promises.

Both sides of government have treated racing shabbily in Queensland, especially Labor, who have always misread the nature of its participants.

Labor has always been reluctant to help racing because it sees it as a sport of the rich and famous – the sport of kings – but for every BMW-driving owner who runs a law firm, there are thousands of battlers lower down the chain just doing their best to earn a crust.

It is not just the galloping code which has been treated poorly. Albion Park harness racing caller Chris Barsby has been broadcasting out of a makeshift elevated shipping container for a decade as the industry awaits news of the redevelopment of a facility which is as tired as a desert explorer.

Five years ago the harness industry lost its Gold Coast track, with the promise of a new one, but as yet there is no plan and the funds generated from the sale of the old track have vaporised.

The much-maligned greyhounds have been talking about a new track at Rocklea but the plan seems to go on and off the table every few months.

Robert Craddock CM today

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« Last Edit: 2018-Oct-15, 03:43 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-15, 04:21 PM Reply #1694 »

---feeling abandoned

The message from the state government could hardly be more clear.

The most useful next contribution to the debate about Queensland is an assessment of the electoral consequences of either party losing the 'racing vote'.

What would be electoral suicide in Victoria or NSW may not be in Queensland.


Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-17, 09:25 AM Reply #1695 »
Trad’s punt on bookie tax

WITH a truce having been struck among owners, trainers and jockeys over strike action on Cox Plate and Melbourne Cup day, all eyes are now on Treasurer Jackie Trad and what she will do with the Point of Consumption tax on corporate bookies.

My understanding is that Trad (right) will come back to the industry on Friday with a compromise deal.

The deal includes an option for the all-codes board at Racing Queensland to be abolished, and it goes back to individual thoroughbred, harness and greyhound boards. Meanwhile, news of new greyhound tracks at Darra and Yamanto remain on hold.

Here’s another reason why the racing sector doesn’t believe a word the Government says. In 2006, the Bligh Government announced $10 million for a new greyhound track on the Gold Coast to replace Parklands, which was to make way for the new University hospital. A rolled gold $10 million cheque.

I’ve combed the Gold Coast since 2006 looking for that new track, and unless it’s hidden away somewhere in the hills, I’m yet to see it. ENDS

Peter Gleeson's column in the CM yesty      It'll be very interesting if the all codes board is abolished seeing how "they" intend  to unscramble the egg that is RQ.

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-18, 07:02 AM Reply #1696 »
Alliance sets its deadline
MARK OBERHARDT

THE alliance protesting against the treatment of racing by the State Government has given officials until tomorrow to report positive moves.

The alliance of trainers, jockeys, owners and breeders suspended a threat of industrial action on Cox Plate Day and Melbourne Cup Day after last week meeting ministers from the State Government and Racing Queensland officials.

On Monday the alliance asked RQ for an urgent update so it could consider its position.

Meanwhile, officials are hoping for a break in the weather to allow Saturday’s meetings to proceed after today’s Doomben meeting became the seventh to be abandoned in southeast Queensland in the past week.

Doomben track manager Jim Roberts said if the rain eased as predicted the track should dry quickly and racing could be possible on Saturday.ENDS

According to Peter Gleeson who wrote earlier it's his understanding  that Treasurer Jackie Trad will deliver a compromise solution for the Alliance to consider...you would think it would need to be something worthwhile to avert the proposed strike aimed at the guvment which IMO would have  little or no impact on anyone apart from the strikers themselves who would be the biggest losers should the madness be implemented.


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Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Oct-19, 08:02 AM Reply #1697 »
Well it appears the strikers are set to cut off their noses to spite their face when the guvment failed to respond with an offer to inject a fair share of the PoC tax into the racing industry not just the thoroughbreds as Nathan Exelby reports in the CM today.

 Strike looms as deadline goes
NATHAN EXELBY
RACING EDITOR


SUPPORT: Stirling Hinchliffe.

QUEENSLAND’S thoroughbred industry moved a step closer to strike action last night after it failed to secure a change to the State Government’s point of consumption tax offer.

After meeting with Treasurer Jackie Trad and Racing Minister Stirling Hinchliffe last Tuesday, the thoroughbred alliance set a deadline of yesterday for the Government to table a new offer.

Early yesterday, Hinchliffe’s chief of staff Louise Foley told the alliance there would be “an answer by day’s end” but nothing official lobbed.

Instead, Hinchliffe spoke to alliance members last night. It is expected an official letter will be sent this morning, with the Government saying it will continue to work on the industry’s proposal.

For the moment, there has been no change to the package outlined by Trad earlier this month.

The alliance representing trainers, owners, breeders and jockeys believes the Government has had ample time to respond, both over the past fortnight and previous six months.

In lieu of no firm deal being put on the table, it is likely it will now proceed with strike action proposed for Cox Plate day and possibly Melbourne Cup day. Hinchliffe told parliament yesterday he expected the consultation process with industry to continue.

“This is important we continue to consult about how this tax – which is all about getting something out of corporate bookmakers who have contributed nothing – how we get that out of them and make sure we contribute back to this industry and back to the state of Queensland.,” he said.

The industry alliance met late last night to determine its next move; which will be to either proceed with strike action, or give the Government more time to come back with an “acceptable” outcome.

Hinchliffe told parliament the Government had been “a great supporter of racing in Queensland” and was “investing heavily in the industry”, noting the $70 million commitment for country racing at last year’s state election.

Top trainer Rob Heathcote said the Minister’s opinion was not shared by his constituents.

The industry has argued the estimated $35 million in net revenue from POC is needed for prizemoney and not for infrastructure or the “squaring off” of a debt.

› CHRIS Meagher was last night named the winner of the 2018 Wayne Wilson Medal.

The medal, which is named after the famed broadcaster and has been presented since 2011, recognises the outstanding training feats of the season.

Meagher won for the interstate and local winning feats of his top mare Savanna Amour.

ONLINE NOW: THE LATEST FROM LAST NIGHT’S ALLIANCE MEETING

The only reference I found online is LNP opposition member Tim Mander giving Trad an earful ......nothing from the comrades in so called alliance strike committee what a futile exercise  to strike on Cox Plate day and Melbourne Cup day when all eyes and punting will be focused on the big races down south nobody will miss Brisbane races or hardly anyone except the trainers and jockeys who are striking The BRC will still get the usual crowd of party goers as will all the other tracks that rely on Cup dayfor their best return each year.

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Offline Stan Still

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« 2018-Oct-19, 09:31 AM Reply #1698 »
Its a pity that wAbbott man is not in charge (or part in charge with his sidekick Credlin), we have found him a well deserved recipient  for the next knighthood, arise Sir Stirling Hinchcliff - the only person in the history of the planet that has managed to stop the trains in Queensland but now to finish off an outstanding daily double he's managed to stop racing in Queensland. Quite an unbelievable feat, so many have tried, so many have gone close but Sir Stirling managed to scoop the pool.

Offline ianb

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« 2018-Oct-19, 12:48 PM Reply #1699 »
Tomorrow first prize money in Race 9 in Sydney is $58 000 - first prize money in race 9 in Brisbane is $42 700 .

Sydney has always had much more prize money than Brisbane.

If you race a horse in Brisbane and you think it's good enough then send it down south but don't be stupid enough to give away your $42 700 first prize money on Cox Plate Day.



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