ANDREW BENSLEY - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK harm-plan harm-plan

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ANDREW BENSLEY - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

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Online wily ole dog

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« 2022-Apr-10, 03:52 PM Reply #50 »
I find it odd that you are so agitated about NSW yet tune into Racing.com.

Basically I find zero wrong with the coverage on 529, 526, 528 or CH7. There’s something for everyone

Ditto, canceling a TAB account but keep corporates  :wacko:

Offline nemisis

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« 2022-Apr-10, 04:21 PM Reply #51 »
There is one consistent theme about Sky Racing.
They tell lies.

I can remember when the 2nd channel was introduced and charged for??? :what:
We were told it wasn't to show more racing it was to improve the quality of the broadcast.....what an effing lie.

I used to watch a bit of kiwi racing on Sky.
The Wellington Cup goes on to a split screen and the race broadcast switches to an obscure Queensland race 1/2 through.
What a farce....all in a day's work for the morons on Sky....something for everyone alright.
Canceling my acc. just meant I ridded myself of that rubbish.

Offline Jeunes

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« 2022-Apr-13, 07:22 AM Reply #52 »

Offline nemisis

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« 2022-Apr-13, 09:49 AM Reply #53 »
Just who is the "best" horse and the "best" trainer these days can only be answered when proper doping measures are put in place....sad, ain't it???
I don't know doping regulations in Japan but looking at Hong Kong, you know you can applaud what you are watching....that's clean racing....no lasix.

Interesting that when law was past in USA to take the Doping "standards" out of the racing industries hands and into USADA....the racing industry appealed....WTF.

Get ready, horse racing. The days of lax enforcement on drug use, sham investigations and slaps on the wrist are coming to an end. Help is on the way.

That’s the message, at least, coming out of the sport Tuesday after the passage of the federal government funding bill passed Monday. Tucked into that bill was the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act (HISA), which passed the House of Representatives earlier this year and establishes a national regulatory board that will standardize medication use and racetrack safety rather than rely on individual state racing commissions. After it is signed by President Trump, the law will go into effect July 1, 2022.

Skepticism is natural about whether this sweeping change in how horse racing will be regulated actually makes a difference. We’ve heard it all before from horse racing, a sport whose leaders have said for years it wanted to clean up its act and regain the trust of the public after a series of high-profile scandals and racetrack tragedies.

But if there’s one reason to believe in horse racing’s ability to enforce tougher drug standards, just listen to Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

“For us to be involved with the program, it’s going to have to have a rigorous set of rules,” Tygart told USA TODAY Sports.

Travis Tygart, CEO of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency
Within the HISA bill, which gained legislative momentum after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s constituents at Churchill Downs and other key groups got on board with it this summer, is a provision stating that horse racing’s new national authority “shall seek to enter into agreement with USADA which will act as the anti-doping and medication control enforcement agency.”

This wasn’t news to Tygart, who has been in conversations with the horse racing industry going on eight years. As long as the funding is made available to administer the program, USADA — the independent body responsible for determining whether Olympic athletes are clean — will oversee a national drug testing program for horse racing and have the power to investigate violations and enforce penalties.

For a sport where the risks of getting caught have not often outweighed the potential rewards of doping, it could be quite a shock to the system.

“I think it should be night and day because the current system is a myriad, a patchwork of different rules and regulations and it’s not applied evenly across any of the 38 different racing jurisdictions,” Tygart said. "Our hope is to absolutely professionalize it and give those in the sport confidence that it works and that there is no choice other than to win the right way, which is clean and ultimately that’s going to benefit the sport itself as well as the health of the animal.”

It’s going to be a massive and potentially complicated undertaking. Thousands of horses compete every day at racetracks from coast to coast, and USADA’s focus to this point has been human, not equine athletes.

But if there’s legitimate buy-in to let USADA do its thing, it could make a difference.

Frankly, horse racing needs it.

Trainer Bob Baffert, a two-time Triple Crown winner and by far the biggest personality in the sport, has been hit with four drug violations this year, two of which involved Breeders’ Cup Filly and Mare Sprint champion Gamine. In 2019, a New York Times story revealed that Baffert’s Triple Crown winner Justify had tested positive for the banned substance scopolamine after the Santa Anita Derby but that California regulators were slow to act because it might have precluded the horse from competing in the Kentucky Derby.

Just this month, the Santa Anita Park board of stewards ruled in Baffert’s favor on a case attempting to overturn the result of the 2018 Santa Anita Derby and give the first-place purse money to the connections of runner-up Bolt D’Oro.

Justify's victory in the 2018 Santa Anita Derby was challenged, but trainer Bob Baffert prevailed.
Baffert has claimed that the small amounts of scopolamine found in Justify were due to jimson weed contaminating his feed supply. When two of his horses tested positive for lidocaine at Oaklawn Park earlier this year, it was blamed on an employee wearing a pain relieving patch on his back and inadvertently transferring it to the horses.

Still, Baffert has promised to be more diligent and has hired outside help to oversee that protocols are followed.

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Meanwhile, the Southern District of New York issued four federal indictments in March that charged 27 people with conspiring to illegally doping racehorses including Jason Servis, a prominent trainer whose Maximum Security crossed the wire first in the 2019 Kentucky Derby but was disqualified for interfering with another horse in the stretch.

Those two high-profile cases illustrate why so many fans and bettors have become disillusioned with horse racing.

On one hand, a famous trainer in Baffert whose purportedly minor drug violations are explained away, litigated for years or lightly penalized while feeding into long-running suspicions about why he wins so many big races. On the other hand, blatant corruption that the sport’s drug testing infrastructure wasn’t equipped to catch without the FBI.

For a long time, certain elements and interest groups within horse racing have resisted nationalizing regulations and significant restrictions on medications. But when you combine what was plainly obvious in the FBI indictments and the general over-medication of Thoroughbreds to mask issues like bleeding from their nostrils or joint pain, making the American breed more fragile and susceptible to on-track death, “it created a perfect storm where there’s no other solution,” Tygart said. “The status quo is unacceptable and this is a monumental step in the right direction.” .....ENDS.

The HISA appealed this and lost ...thankfully.
Australian racing that seem to follow the American "model" should be on the front foot.






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