Greetings All - Looking for Some Insight - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK harm-plan harm-plan

Racehorse TALK



Greetings All - Looking for Some Insight - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Greetings All - Looking for Some Insight  (Read 436 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline The Yank

  • class1
  • User 2857
  • Posts: 14
O.P. « 2019-Oct-10, 04:54 AM »
Greetings to all.  I am a Yank residing in the Southern U.S. looking to bet Australian races.  I am a lifelong handicapper specializing in U.S. (mostly turf) racing, but the betting pools in the states are so bad I am expanding my horizons.  To start, I need to buy some data.  In the U.S. we have the Daily Racing Form, Timeform U.S. and BRIS and that's about it.  Those three each have their strengths and weaknesses.  Where would be a good place to buy accurate race ratings and performance figures, track bias information, etc. on OZ racing?  I have a vague familiarity with some Aussie providers, mainly Racing & Sports, Accuratings, Punting Form and The Sportsman.  I thought the best place to start would be to ask knowledgeable Aussie players what data they buy most frequently.

Thanks in advance for any help and feel free to contact me to chat if you like.

Cheers
Ian

Offline Grega9430

  • Listed
  • User 267
  • Posts: 498
« 2019-Oct-10, 11:31 AM Reply #1 »
Hi Yank, some links below, I subscribe to AAP Megaform (Form Analyser elite) for upcoming races and compile this but to get an historical results database you might have to go to one of the others below.

https://www.aapmegaform.com.au/home.aspx

https://www.trb.com.au/horse-racing-data.aspx

https://ratings2win.com.au/

https://southcoastdatabase.com.au/
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-10, 11:34 AM by Grega9430 »

Offline The Yank

  • class1
  • User 2857
  • Posts: 14
« 2019-Oct-10, 01:50 PM Reply #2 »
Thanks very much for the reply, and thanks for the gentleman that sent me a PM.  I will reply to that but I can't until 24 hrs has elapsed since account activation.

All of this is very cool, and at the same time a little daunting.  I have been betting races in the states since I was 15 but now that are pools are so anemic (mostly due to an average field size of 7 at some tracks) I have to start looking elsewhere.

Cheers.

Ian

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 26459
« 2019-Oct-13, 09:10 AM Reply #3 »


.  I have been betting races in the states since I was 15 but now that are pools are so anemic (mostly due to an average field size of 7 at some tracks) I have to start looking elsewhere.

Cheers.

Ian

Interesting comment ďYankĒ
The are some ignorant people, usually pushing their own agenda, who are insisting that we get to similar farcical situation with pathetically small field sizes as well. Sadly they are about destroying our industry

One of them even ventures to this forum pushing  his view on a daily basis.
🤮

Offline Peter Mair

  • Group 2
  • User 326
  • Posts: 4834
« 2019-Oct-13, 07:00 PM Reply #4 »

The ANZSUS alliance means we help all Yanks, faithfully.


[...before I speak on topic .......... do I detect a puppy holding back a 'bark' until I have spoken?]

Small field sizes in Europe and the US reflect the problems of the racing industry being in decline there.

Australia is a special case: -- almost all of the races run here are of no consequence -- being run on non-metropolitan tracks -- the function of these 'country' races is more about shifting 'off-budget' tax-takeouts (from metropolitan racing turnover) to rural areas with a local race track.

For metropolitan racing of any consequence these days, in Sydney and Melbourne, administrators seem to be responding in the same way as Hong Kong -- confusing the punters by inflating the fields to add a random disturbance to the established form.

 'No-hopers', hoping to run 10th, give the running of a race some of the character of a 'pinball machine' game where the 'better chances', there to win,  need to weave a path (between), (or around) or (ahead of)  'no-hopers' cluttering the field as the pace picks up. Often they do not get a clear run.

The 'relief' for the racing industry from this tactic is likely to be short lived.

Punters make be a bit old and a bit slow to learn but as the memories of a good day 'on the punt' become faint, they will pull the plug.

............... it cannot be long before the betting on the races is 'in club' .......small groups of like-ability people betting among themselves and sharing 100% of the pool among themselves.

The US community could also do this.






Offline pegasyber

  • Group 2
  • User 909
  • Posts: 1505
« 2019-Oct-14, 04:28 PM Reply #5 »
Well that was hopeless. Will go back to not betting, have not missed it anyway. Was off Topic, sorry about that.
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-14, 07:37 PM by pegasyber »

Offline The Yank

  • class1
  • User 2857
  • Posts: 14
« 2019-Oct-15, 03:36 AM Reply #6 »
I have been betting horses here in the U.S. since I was 15 (more than 40 years ago).  At one time, about 15 years ago I was considered a sharp.  I put in the requisite time and made money consistently watching videos and compiling notes on races in NY, KY, Florida and Maryland.  I am a little older now, maybe not as diligent or hard working as I once was, but the greatest hit to my punting has come from the deterioration of the U.S. racing product.  Ten years ago I would find nice overlays almost every weekend, usually in full fields of grass racing.  There was less computer money in the pools then and much more dumb money.  The kind that ignored or underrated the impact of pace and trip which is so much more important on turf than on dirt.  Alas, that edge is gone.  The closing of a large NY off-track-betting franchise (more than $1 billion a year in volume) meant there were far fewer guppies to prey on.  Average field size is down a full horse or more at most tracks.  At the worst of them, the average field size is less than 7 runners.  Contrast that to field size in Korea and Singapore where the average is 11.

I'm pretty plugged into the industry here, having consulted for tracks and professional players as well as having run two wagering shops.  It's depressing what has happened to the sport in the states.  Hopefully it's not too late for this old dog to learn some new tricks.   :biggrin:

Best to all.

Ian

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 26459
« 2019-Oct-15, 06:36 AM Reply #7 »

.  I put in the requisite time and made money consistently watching videos and compiling notes on races in NY, KY, Florida and Maryland.  I am a little older now, maybe not as diligent or hard working as I once was,

Ian, i can certainly relate to those 2 comments. Being diligent is so hard but I believe doing the video form is the most important thing for success on Australian racing.

Without looking at any stats or ratings etc, the video found me a number of winners in the last week. $5, $6, $30,$20 & $12 dividends amongst them

The access to the videos is easy and free of charge.

Hope you enjoy our racing. With the turf, field sizes, competitive riding tactics by jocks & the variety of track styles itís great viewing and identifying winners is a lot of fun :clap2:

Offline Peter Mair

  • Group 2
  • User 326
  • Posts: 4834
« 2019-Oct-15, 06:40 AM Reply #8 »

What does Andrew Beyer say?

The pace of the decline in public interest in US racing has been dramatic -- and in Europe much the same.

Be wary of the Australian solution -- paying $5,000 for finishing 10th in ordinary races -- thus ensuring only that the fields are inflated with horses that cannot win but will be be disruptive to the chances of the better horses.

As for 'new tricks' -- less racing product of higher quality -- contested by qualified runners only.

..........any nation only needs a couple of tracks in a couple of cities.

Offline Peter Mair

  • Group 2
  • User 326
  • Posts: 4834
« 2019-Oct-17, 05:52 AM Reply #9 »


Make up your own mind -- about the need for three of a kind

THREE OF A KIND

Another day, another plum gig. Former police minister Troy Grant, having departed Macquarie Street at the March state election, has added Racing NSW to his considerable resume.

Grant, as we recall, attempted to ban greyhound racing when he was racing minister.

He has now been given the green light from Parliamentary Ethics Adviser John Evans to start work as the chairman of the Racing NSW integrity assurance committee.

But he wonít be getting rich off this gig. Itís a voluntary role with only expenses covered.

Grant will be looking after race stewards, drug testing and licensing. Two former racing ministers, Liberal George Souris and Laborís Kevin Greene, are already on the Racing NSW board.

Offline napes

  • VIP Club
  • Group3
  • User 29
  • Posts: 848
« 2019-Oct-17, 10:00 AM Reply #10 »

..........any nation only needs a couple of tracks in a couple of cities.

[/quote]

You really are a F@#$kwit  :censored:

So anyone who lives outside those 2 cities don't have the right to go to the races.

There's really only a need for a couple of football stadiums as well. 2 cricket grounds, 1 netball court, 2 tennis courts and a golf course.

Imagine all the money we would save and the corrupt administrators we could get rid of  :bye:

We could put the money into mental health and get you the treatment you need.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 26459
« 2019-Oct-17, 11:43 AM Reply #11 »
Yep, a thread about a welcome to a new member gets the Mair lecture :stop:

Offline Peter Mair

  • Group 2
  • User 326
  • Posts: 4834
« 2019-Oct-17, 10:56 PM Reply #12 »


Honk Honk -- Singer poor -- Paris -- et al eat al


BACK TO ALL TOPICS
Sitemap