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Mountain Races: no audited accountability of the hype - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

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Offline Peter Mair

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O.P. « 2018-Oct-15, 10:09 AM »

Mountain Races: can we have some audited accountability of the hype, please

The dare-to-be-great marketing machine beholden to RacingNSW is overwhelming common-sense assessments of the impact of the new mountain raceday.

Now two years old but 'reportedly' rivalling the Mexican Cup for top-spot on the national racing calendar.

There are too many loose ends to the story to give the well-coordinated hype much credibility.

No one knows how many tickets were sold in the Kosciuszko lottery or who bought them.

The addition of the Kosciuszko to the Everest program may have boosted crowd numbers on Saturday making suspect the comparison with 2017. 2KSKY reported bus-loads of country folk in town for the day.

The media post mortem today is full of tantalizing tit-bits.

Why would 'independent' journalists would toe the party line so faithfully un-qualified.

The crowd was up just under 20 per cent from the first running of The Everest, ................It was remarkable result considering it was a showery afternoon.

“In two years, The Everest has joined the biggest and most traditional sporting events in Sydney,” .... “It is already bigger than day-night cricket, Twenty20 cricket, Swans games and NRL finals at Moore Park.
“The only thing that I can compare it with is the Test at the SCG. It is up there with State Of Origin, the Bledisloe Cup Test and the NRL grand final. That is exclusive company in Sydney sport.


..........................delighted with the betting turnover, which was particularly strong for the country-only slots race the Koscuiszko.  "The Everest continues to go from strength to strength, but the Kosciuszko was the third biggest betting race on the program, which shows its engagement around the state,".



Luckily for most of us the Terrorgraph has pay-walled this story:

McAvaney: Everest carrying racing to a new place

Game changer JUST as World Series Cricket changed cricket forever, revered sports broadcaster Bruce McAvaney claims The Everest is revolutionising racing like he has never seen before


Over at the SMH is a story that begs some questions about the possible availability of free-ticket entry to the members stand.

Full stands, party mood as Sydney’s premier raceday scales even greater heights

If you looked up at the old stand at Randwick on Saturday, it was full before race four, which just goes to show how engaged the crowd was with the races.


The younger-set are in the marketing sights but may not be saviour-gamblers

The public area was once again dominated by under 35-year-olds, which opens the sport up to a new market. It is something Sydney racing hasn’t had this century and hopefully it will help convert a few into more regular raceday fans.

In just two years, The Everest has changed the culture and perception of racing and attracted a new, younger audience to the sport.

“We wanted to engage the next generation and we have...........”  “We have only just began"

The Everest meeting was a showcase window for racing ...... its strength was that 78 per cent of the (non-members) public tickets were sold to those aged 35 and under. “Any sport in the world that had that level engagement in that younger age group would be amazed,” [no mention of any free members tickets]



Administrators may be reading too much of what they like to see

Randwick's $10 million war-chest to make The Everest even bigger

Racing NSW and the Australian Turf Club are set to open a $10 million war chest to expand Royal Randwick's facilities so they can grow The Everest meeting after another phenomenal success in the second running of the race on Saturday..................a further makeover to make sure anyone who wants to get to the races can be accommodated at the track.












Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-15, 07:20 PM Reply #1 »


No one is telling us this

No wonder the media are so beholden to the party line from Druitt Street.


Sydney’s commercial media outlets are among the biggest winners from Saturday’s Everest race meeting. In the weeks leading up to the race, three advertisers spent almost $900,000 on print, radio and television ads.

Marketing and media firm Ebiquity put the spend by betting agency TAB, the Australian Turf Club, and the Australian Jockey Club at $867,000, mostly in Sydney media, with much smaller spends in Brisbane and Melbourne, and smaller again in Adelaide and Perth.

The Sydney Morning Herald had almost daily ads, including four front and back page ads, in the two weeks leading up to the race. The Herald and The Daily Telegraph both carried wrap-arounds and lift-outs dedicated to detailed coverage of the race.



Offline Peter Mair

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« 2018-Oct-17, 06:08 PM Reply #2 »

How many of the 'crowd' on mountain day had free tickets?

I am thinking the only 'old stand' at  Randwick is the 'members stand' and the following comment in the SMH on Monday might imply that 'the crowd' was inflated by a large distribution of free and guest passes to this stand.

It is a reasonable expectation that media writers reporting a 'full house' might inquire and report on the role that free-tickets may have  played.

If you looked up at the old stand at Randwick on Saturday, it was full before race four, which just goes to show how engaged the crowd was with the races.


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