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Shane Anderson leaves Racing.com - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Shane Anderson leaves Racing.com  (Read 453 times)

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O.P. « 2019-May-24, 05:41 PM »
Thank you for the opportunity
 
Shane Anderson@Globalgallop
1:31pm

From my earliest days, racing has been my favourite sport.
It grew from times as a boy that I would spend with my father at the track, quality time together that will always be in my heart.

The stories of racing greats – horse, rider, trainer – were what I would read before bed, the Best Bets would be what I would read on a Saturday morning on the way to playing soccer, and I would steal the race reviews from the Sunday newspapers before dad could get them, while simultaneously waiting for the racing segment on Seven’s World of Sport and, later, Sportsworld.

I would listen to racing radio, absorbing the information supplied by the race callers and tipsters, developing a knowledge base that would be the foundation of my eventual career.

The love that I had for horses such as John Henry, Mr Magic, Strawberry Road, Hayai, Bounty Hawk, Gogong, Beau Zam, Empire Rose, Shaftesbury Avenue and Let’s Elope as I grew up would inspire me to want to be a part of telling the story of racing, showcasing what makes it great while challenging its problem areas.

Saturday’s Andrew Ramsden Stakes meeting at Flemington ends sixteen years of covering racing for me and what a journey it has been.

It has taken me around the world, given me opportunities to broadcast on radio and television, has offered me the chance to help lead a team of outstanding people across a digital and broadcast business.

The five years I have been with Racing.com since its launch in 2014 have been the best five years of my professional life so far.

While nothing is perfect, the story of Racing.com is a great success and it is important to acknowledge.

It was initially designed to be a digital platform yet, within six months from the launch, broadcaster TVN collapsed and the Victorian thoroughbred industry had to decide as to what to do with its media rights. Do a deal with Sky Racing or invest in its own asset?

In a joint venture with Seven West Media, Racing Victoria empowered Racing.com to become the Victorian thoroughbred racing broadcaster. The partnership with Seven would allow racing to be broadcast every day of the week on free-to-air television, a unique position for any sport in the world.

After operating initially as a streaming vehicle via the digital platform, Racing.com burst into life on free-to-air television on Memsie Stakes Day August 29, 2015, with the legendary Bruce McAvaney leading the coverage that day.

Since then, South Australia has joined the coverage and Hong Kong racing is broadcast weekly, with additional international feature meetings along the way. Hopefully, more Australian racing will be introduced as media rights become available.

The evolution of the business in five years has been remarkable, and turnover on Victorian thoroughbred racing has increased by more than 30 per cent in that time. Racing.com has played its part in this.

Through broadcast, digital and social media coverage, we have been there to cover racing’s magic moments as well as some of its most challenging.

The one thing that I am most proud of in my time with Racing.com is how we have been able to foster outstanding young talent to sit alongside experienced journalists and presenters, which will serve the industry well for many years to come.

My career in the racing media has been a privilege.

I have been blessed to witness racing from all parts of the world and, proudly, have assisted in promoting coverage of the sport internationally and not just parochially.
It has been a dream come true.

I have been lucky enough to have interviewed some of the biggest names in world racing – trainers, jockeys, owners, breeders and administrators, and attended brilliant race meetings.

Interviewing racing legends such as Bart Cummings, Roy Higgins, Sir Henry Cecil, Aidan O’Brien, John Moore, Frankie Dettori, Sir Michael Stoute, Ryan Moore, David Hayes, Gai Waterhouse, Lee Freedman, John Hawkes, Glen Boss, Damien Oliver, Hugh Bowman and Chris Waller.

Others who, while perhaps not as well known, were as equally enthralling. I still remember my radio interviews with the late Kelso Wood, who provided one-word responses all the way through. Or chats with John Gunning as the love he would have for his mare Hi Belle would make me smile. Just as it would for Udyta Clarke, the late Mick Burles, and many more.

The advice and inspiration I received from two people we have lost recently, Les Carlyon and Nick Columb, will serve me well for the remainder of my career, even though they came from vastly different angles.

Interviews with people such as Lloyd Williams and the late Andrew Ramsden, titans in racing across many areas, would always be a learning experience.

To sit alongside Shane Dye, Peter Moody, Wayne Hawkes and Steven Arnold on a broadcast and witness first hand their unique abilities as champions of the sport, being able to see things about a horse or a race that would miss the eye of most.

To tell the story of horses that have reached the masses, the likes of Winx, Black Caviar, So You Think, Frankel, Sea The Stars, Sacred Kingdom, Makybe Diva, Yeats, Vodka and Takeover Target, has been the thrill of a lifetime.

For every glorious moment in racing there will often be a difficult time, and nothing worse than reporting when a jockey has died in a race fall or staff member in a trackwork incident. Truly horrible events that will often unite the industry in ways that no other can. The National Jockeys Trust, and those that support it, do so much for so many.

Cobalt and drugs, allegations of race fixing, and horse welfare issues have been a major part of the coverage in racing during my involvement in the media. People will continually take sides as to how well these matters have been handled but the improvements to managing integrity challenges by racing administrators must be applauded. Racing will always have people looking to find an edge that will blur lines. The battle is how to catch them.

Similarly, the evolution of the wagering environment remains a huge challenge for racing as it remains the major funding mechanism. A contracting market, with race fields fees and point of consumption taxes providing challenges, will likely make the next five-years some of the most important that the racing industry faces. But the customer must never be ignored in any of the negotiations, and sadly they have been too often.

Racing has the uniqueness of needing tradition to meet innovation and that will always be a challenge.

The best advice that I received when starting in the media was that other people’s opinions of you are none of your business. It has served me well remembering that as you are never going to please everyone along the way.

I would like to thank my wonderful colleagues over the past sixteen years for the opportunity to work alongside you.

Most of all, I thank you – the racing audience – for allowing me to live my dream.

ENDS

Good luck to him ......there's no indication as to his reasons for leaving ....nothing from the management when someone is displaced  when the spin is like "leaving to pursue other opportunities"..... has to be something better in store for him to leave Racing.com...hope so anyway he provided a good service he  will be missed.

Giddy Up :beer:   


Offline Bubbasmith

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« 2019-May-24, 05:58 PM Reply #1 »
Shane Anderson, Racing.com's Editor-in-Chief and General Manager - Content, will be making the move to Europe to continue his career in the sport and wagering industry.

Anderson has accepted a senior management role with a major iGaming media company from July 1 and will finish up with Racing.com at the end of May. Further details on his new role will be announced in the coming weeks.

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« 2019-Jul-11, 09:48 AM Reply #2 »
Shane's replacement Terry McAuliffe top SA racecaller...very versatile ......this is too good an opportunity to miss only in his 50's has many years ahead Good Luck to him sounds a very decent person family man.
Giddy Up :beer:



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