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Stormy's Turf Topics - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

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Offline Stormy

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O.P. « 2009-Jan-25, 12:53 PM »
Thought I would post a few posts that might be interesting to some !
 8-)

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 01:01 PM Reply #1 »
The first Stud Book.

Horse breeding In Australia developed rapidly. At the first race meeting in 1810, very little was asked about a horses ancestry, he was judged by speed alone.
By 1825, the STC was able to rule that  pure-bred horses be restricted to handicap races. Soon, breeder's  in New South Wales were feeling the need for a stud book after the fashion of the General Stud Book OF England, and on 31 May 1843, the Australian Jockey Club announced their intention to collate one.
Fowler Boyd Price's  The Stud Book of New South Wales was published in 1859.

 8-)

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Jan-25, 01:04 PM Reply #2 »
 wow THAT WAS great mate keep it up riveting stuff

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 01:23 PM Reply #3 »
Racing Down By The Salt Water River.

While Melbourne's founding parties were still squabbling over who had got there first, it's new inhabitants - 984 male and 280 female at the end of 1837 - got on with enjoying themselves.
The first official Melbourne race meeting was on the 6 and 7 March 1838 within three years of settlement.

The meeting was held at Sheoak Hill an area now mainly taken up by Spencer Street Railway stations and yards with the starting post close to the existing North Melbourne railway station.

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 01:43 PM Reply #4 »
In 1851, along with the discovery of GOLD in Victoria, came the establishment of the Victoria Turf Club, made up of the old guard of men who had already made their way in the colony. In 1854 the Victorian Parliament granted 200 pounds as the purse for a Queen's Plate, and that year the Turf Club introduced a Spring Racing Carnival.
As the VTC gained in strength and financial clout, so the opposition grew. The club's disqualification of William Lang in 1855 was one cause of unrest.
Lang a member of the pastoralist  family said to have originally had grazing rights on the crown land which became Flemington Racecourse, had been disqualified at a country race meeting and was subsquently disqualified from racing  by the VTC for five years.

In 1855 the Turf Club ran it's first Victoria Derby, with stake money of a 100 pounds along with the entrance fee of 10 pounds for each horse. It was Won by the chestnut Rose Of May. The filly's owner H.N Simson was founding member of the VJC, formed in 1856.

The VJC's first meeting was a four-day affair in February 1857. in 1861 the VTC came up with the Melbourne Cup.
 8-)

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-25, 02:02 PM Reply #5 »
By 1825, the STC was able to rule that  pure-bred horses be restricted to handicap races.

What was the purpose of this ruling ?

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 02:07 PM Reply #6 »
Their Racing All Around The Bush.

Racing spread quickly throughout rural Australia. By the late 1820's, annual meetings were held in Ross Tasmania.
In New South Wales, the first Liverpool races, held in October 1832. The next meeting was held in Maitland in which horses named Pitch and Toss won principal events.
In 1833 Captain John Piper organised the first meeting in Bathurst area at the private course on his Alloway Bank estate.

In 1834 a race club was formed in Goulburn and the Illawarra Turf Club started with a meeting in Wollongong.
Racing in the form of match races was already popular in the Parramatta and Hawksbury area's when Sydney held it's first meeting in 1810.
In 1841 the Hawksbury Racing Club held its first race meeting at Windsor.
By 1850 racing had spread to 45 districts in the colony of New South Wales. As in Liverpool and Bathurst, many of the courses were private.
Geelong Turf Club held it's first public race meeting in 1841.

As settlers moved out into the rest of  rural Australia, racecourses were among the first reserves settlers set aside in their own towns.
In South Australia, early meetings at Penola and Apsley near the Victorian Border each lasted a week.
By the 1850's racing had spread into rural Western Australia, the were meetings inland at York in the 1840's and Bunbury held its first meeting in 1854, and Busselton two years later.

 8-)

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 02:36 PM Reply #7 »
Ararat.

In May 1857,a rich vein of gold transformed an isolated mining camp in the shadow of the Grampians in Western Victoria into a robust city.
When the Mount Ararat Advertiser first appeared in August 1857, the city of Ararat boasted 16 hotels, 6 banks, numerous lawyers, 2 schools, 5 doctors, a horse mart, wine and spirits merchants, and more than 30,000 people.

And what did every burgeoning Australian rural township need ?  A race meeting that's what, though the town at this time had no post office, no resident magistrate,
or courthouse, no gold receiver's office or escort, and a police force of 10.

Public meeting were held to appoint a committee  and agree on the rules and the residents mining warden declared the he would not allow any mining claim to be jumped during race week.

  emthup

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 02:45 PM Reply #8 »
By 1825, the STC was able to rule that  pure-bred horses be restricted to handicap races.

What was the purpose of this ruling ?

Just reading, it does not give a purpose I'm sorry .....

 8-)

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Jan-25, 02:55 PM Reply #9 »
Because any old nag can win at level weights, the hallmark of a CHAMPION is that it can beat others giving them weight i.e. win Handicaps.

Keep up with main group Authorised.

I've suspected that you haven't been paying attention.

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 03:03 PM Reply #10 »
The Cup: A mad idea, doomed to failure!

It's effect would be to make any brumby bought out of a mob for thirty schillings the equal of the finest horse in the land.
It is a mad idea, doomed to failure said the newspaper of the concept of the Melbourne Cup.
Rather than a race between the champion horses of the colonies at set weights, derby-like race ( like the Australian Champion Sweepstakes which had proved popular
as it rotated around the colonies  in the late 1850's.) the Melbourne Cup was to be a handicap race run over a long distance of two miles.

The Melbourne Cup was an effort  by the Victorian Jockey Club to make its Spring meeting a success, which was apart of the on going rivalry with Victoria Turf Club.
The VTC had, on Saturday, 3 November 1860, been successful with the Corporation Cup, a handicap for a purse of three sovereigns and a cup valued at 50 sovereigns presented by the Mayor on behalf of the corporation of the city of Melbourne.

The Melbourne Cup was dreamed up some time before 9 September 1861, which is the date the VJC met at the Albion Hotel in Bourke Street, Melbourne, and considered the propriety of giving 100 pounds to be raced  at the forthcoming Turf Club race in November.

The idea of the Melbourne Cup is credited to a committeeman of the Victoria  Turf Club , Captain Frederick Charles Standish.

  emthup
« Last Edit: 2009-Jan-25, 03:06 PM by Stormy »

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-25, 03:36 PM Reply #11 »
Archer sails to a win in Melbourne.

Melbourne in 1861 was prosperous city, still building on gold-given prosperity and increased population. Some 150 000 people lived the it had independence
from NSW, Victorian Rules Football, gas lighting, Clubs, reticulated water, a University, - and great confidence.

Four thousand enthusiastic patrons attended Flemington racecourse on the first Thursday ( not Tuesday ) in November 1861.
The night before the race a market was framed at the Albion Hotel. There was plenty of support for the local horse Morman at 2/1, while in NSW entry Archer eased to 8/1.

The traditional story goes that a month before the cup, Dave Power, Etienne De Mestre's strapper, had led and ridden Archer the 560 miles from Braidwood/Nowra in NSW to Melbourne .
The journey took more than five weeks. However, recent examination of the shipping lists makes it almost certain that Archer in fact came by ship.
Archer was trained by de Mestre, foaled on Me T.J. Roberts property, Exeter Farm, and owned by the estate of T.M. Royds. T.M. Royds died while riding in 1852.

De Mestre trained Archer in Melbourne from stables situated behind the Botancial Hotel in South Yarra, galloping him on the St Kilda Park.
De Mestre , though white-haired , was 29 in 1861 and owned a 1200 acre model training establishment on Shoalhaven.
It was rated the best private track in NSW.
He was born Sydney in 1832, and won the his first race at 15  on his own horse named Sweetheart at Bathurst.
In the 1850's he established  his stud, track and stable on his father's property a Terara at the mouth of the Shoalhaven River.

The 1862 Melbourne Cup saw a repeat of the 1861 Cup with Archer first, winning from Mormons. Archer carried 10 stone 2 pounds, but still ran five seconds faster than the previous  year and was 10 lengths  ahead of Mormons when they crossed the line.
In 1863 a ( technicality )  over Archer's entry prevented his running. Sydneysiders remain suspicious.


Archer won 2 consecutive win in the Melbourne Cup.

 8-)
« Last Edit: 2009-Jan-25, 03:42 PM by Stormy »

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-25, 04:31 PM Reply #12 »
Because any old nag can win at level weights, the hallmark of a CHAMPION is that it can beat others giving them weight i.e. win Handicaps.

Keep up with main group Authorised.

I've suspected that you haven't been paying attention.

So Dunstall ( any old nag ) could beat El Segundo over 1600m ( or any distance ) at level weights ?

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Jan-25, 04:48 PM Reply #13 »
Authorised, once again you've got it arse about.

El Segundo proves nothing by beating Dunsatll at level weights, but proves something if he can give him 8kgs and a beating.

That was why 

"By 1825, the STC was able to rule that  pure-bred horses be restricted to handicap races"



Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-25, 04:53 PM Reply #14 »
What does it prove ?

What does it prove if Dunstall scrapes in by a nostril hair with that 8kgs pull ?

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Jan-25, 05:00 PM Reply #15 »
What does it prove ?

What does it prove if Dunstall scrapes in by a nostril hair with that 8kgs pull ?

The handicapper got it right  :/

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-25, 05:07 PM Reply #16 »
  :biggrin:   Well thats true, but a handicapper should have no say in a championship event or group 1 event and that is what Geoff has basically brought up.

I only asked

By 1825, the STC was able to rule that  pure-bred horses be restricted to handicap races.

What was the purpose of this ruling ?

Offline Stormy

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« 2009-Jan-26, 08:30 AM Reply #17 »
Bushrangers and horse racing.

The bushrangers who terrorised the countryside during the 1850'sand 60's were a particular hazard to the owners of champion racehorses.
Horse stealing was one of their specialities, and they liked to choose the fastest and finest horses in the colonies as their own particular mounts.
 A post-mortem of the champion Troubadour, who was sired by Sir Hercules, revealed nine bullets in various part of his body that had been meant for bushranger Ben Hall.

Between February 1863 and April 1865, the Hall and Gilbert gangs stole 23 well known and successful racehorses in the Central Western Tableland district of New South Wales.
The thoroughbred racehorses provided both the explosive speed and the hardy endurance for rides of up to 200 kilo metres a day which bushrangers needed to evade capture.
Ben Hall stole Troubadour at least three times. On one occasion, he tied up the stable hands at Groggan station at Bland Plains in New South Wales and went to the homestead to tell the owner, Mr Chisholm, I've come for Troubadour' No amount of pleading on Chisholm's behalf worked, and Hall also stole Union Jack, who had recently won the Champion Plate at the Wagga Wagga races.

Because of the threat of horse ( duffing ) as stealing was called, country race meetings caused the authorities headaches and champion racehorses attended under police guard. In May 1864, five quality horses were travelling from Cowra to take part in a race meeting near Young - Dick Turpin, Jemmy Martin, Duke of Athol, Hollyhock and Bergamot.
The horses travelled together, and were stabled at Bong Bong's Koorawatha Inn, to break the journey.
In a spectacular show of force, three members of Ben Hall's gang fired between 25 and 30 shots in their attempt to steal horses, but they had not counted on the Bathurst troopers who accompanied the party in plain clothes.

The Kelly Gang used to travel overland to meetings in northern Victoria and southern New South Wales
1850's to the 1860's.

 8-)

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-26, 08:45 AM Reply #18 »
At what stage in Australian history did Bushrangers become hero's ?

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Jan-26, 08:47 AM Reply #19 »
                                   Ned Kelly

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Jan-26, 09:07 AM Reply #20 »
When knowledgable Australians realised that the Bushrangers had the good sense to steal the horses which could perform well under handicap coditions.

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-26, 09:08 AM Reply #21 »
  :lol:  you  :censored: ing clown

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-26, 09:11 AM Reply #22 »
I'd imagine Bushrangers would have been looking for Hurdlers and Steeple Chasers rather flat handicappers.

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Jan-26, 09:19 AM Reply #23 »
Bushranger   Okay, Mr Landowner, which is your best horse?

Landowner   Oh, my fine black steed, which is unbeaten racing my bay at set weights over a course
   which is very wide, very flat, and has a mile straight.

Bushranger   What about the bay?

Landowner   Oh, he gives the black and a beating when he gives him weight, in any conditions over any type of course.

Bushranger   I'll take the bay.

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Jan-26, 09:23 AM Reply #24 »
I think you are baamboozling yourself there myfriend. The Bay can not beat the Black on A good and proper racecourse but can QUOTE  "Oh, he gives the black and a beating when he gives him weight, in any conditions over any type of course."      :shy:


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