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Offline Authorized

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O.P. « 2017-Feb-01, 11:31 AM »
$10,000,000  race built on similar lines to the Pegasus.

TDN Q&A With Peter V’landys

By Kelsey Riley

Royal Randwick racecourse in Sydney, Australia will host the world’s richest 1200-metre race and richest turf race on Oct. 14 with the inaugural running of the A$10-million The Everest. An initiative of Racing NSW and the Australian Turf Club, The Everest–which will be a weight-for-age race for 3-year-olds and up–will also be the richest race in Australia, dwarfing the A$6.2-million G1 Melbourne Cup. The Everest follows in the mould of The Stronach Group’s GI Pegasus World Cup, in that the 12 starting spots are available to purchase, for A$600,000. The purse will be fully funded by the entry fee as well as additional revenues generated from the event such as wagering, sponsor and broadcast revenues as well as other raceday revenues, and all profits will be distributed among the slot holders.

TDN International Editor Kelsey Riley caught up with Racing NSW Chief Executive Peter V’landys on Thursday to delve deeper into The Everest.

KR: The Everest is very much in the mould of the Pegasus World Cup. Was that the inspiration for the race?

PV: Absolutely. We thought the Pegasus was a great concept and we take our hats off to The Stronach Group for being pioneers and innovators. What we liked about it more than anything else was the marketing potential for Thoroughbred racing to a broader audience. I think The Stronach Group has achieved that because they got enormous coverage for racing in America that they would not normally get. Every effort they’ve put in will be rewarded, because it’ll have ongoing benefits to the branding of Thoroughbred racing in America.

We picked it up in a similar vein. We wanted a vehicle to promote Thoroughbred racing in New South Wales. We used the concept, and once we announced it we had racing on the front page of newspapers, and the lead story on free-to-air TV networks, so it achieved exactly what we were trying to do: promote racing to a bigger audience and take up some media space.

Ours is slightly different to the Pegasus–we’ve tailored it for us. We’re putting the money in which is the shortfall, that’s guaranteed. The holders put in A$7.2-million and we put in A$2.8-million, which is what we generate from sponsorships, wagering and other revenues, and any incremental revenue we get we will put into the race. In actual fact it’s only costing the slot holder A$425,000, because they’re guaranteed to get A$175,000 for running last.

(Editor’s Note: the prizemoney breakdown of The Everest is as follows: the winner will receive A$5.8-million, with A$2.4-million to second, A$800,000 to third, A$400,000 to fourth, A$250,000 to fifth, and sixth to 12th A$175,000)

The only difference with the way we’ve done it is that people have to commit themselves for three years. We want to make sure we’ve got the race, once we build the brand, and we’ve got the charisma of the race and the concept.

We believe one of the great aspects of it is that it has so many stories that can go with it. Let’s say I’ve got a great horse but I don’t have a slot; I’m going to negotiate with someone, or even I’m just an investor that’s never had a horse that goes into Japan and gets Japan to come to Australia at that time, and they share the prizemoney with those people. They’re the sort of stories you want to generate out to the media, and that’s why we love the concept. The first box has been ticked, it’s got enormous media coverage here in Australia, so now we’ve just got to get the 12 slot holders and go from there.

KR: What did you learn, both positive and negative, from the first running of the Pegasus that you think can help make your event a success?

PV: We love the concept about the slot holders. The negative was that they came across two champion horses in California Chrome and Arrogate, but that’s going to happen. That’s why we decided to make it 1200 metres for us here; there’s a massive pool of sprinters. We wanted to get a distance that wasn’t going to be dominated [by a couple of horses], so I guess the little weakness in the Pegasus–although there is no weakness because it’s a fantastic concept–was the fact that they were unlucky that there were two very good horses.

On the positive, they marketed it brilliantly. They got racing back in the media. I just think they’ve done a wonderful job, I take my hat off to them. This is what American racing needed. It was on a massive decline, to be realistic. It started with American Pharoah that generated enormous publicity, and The Stronach Group, which is very innovative, have taken advantage of that fanfare that was generated by American Pharoah with this concept.

KR: While the Pegasus was placed in a spot on the calendar that wouldn’t conflict with other major race meetings, The Everest has been placed in the heart of the spring racing season, and namely on Caulfield Guineas day. Why was this date chosen?

PV: One of our main objectives was to promote the sport to a broader audience. In order to do that you need to get as much media attention as possible. That period of time there is no competition. Our rugby league, which is one of the main sports, and the AFL have finished their seasons. It’d be like the basketball and the gridiron finishing their seasons in America, and there’s a lapse where you’ve got the chance to promote. That day there is no other major events on, and it was the best day to get that promotion.

We believe it’ll compliment the Victorian spring carnival because of the 1200 metre distance we’ve put it as. Two weeks later there’s a race at Moonee Valley for A$1-million [G1 Manikato S.], and there’s a race at Flemington for a further A$1-million [G1 Darley Classic] two weeks later. If a horse did come from overseas, not only can it run in the A$10-million Everest, but it can also run in the Manikato and then in the Darley. So it could assist the Victorian Spring Carnival in getting international sprinters. Yes, it clashes with the Guineas, but that was the date we had to place it on to get the maximum media exposure.

In the future we’re going to possibly look at running it on a Friday night under lights at Randwick. It’s not always going to stay where it is, we just needed to find a day where we could get some publicity and that was the day we selected. That’s one of the reasons we also selected the distance, because it does compliment the racing calendar.

KR: And I understand it took some time for you to decide on that distance for the race?

PV: We looked at all the distances. We’d been working on it for four or five months to get it right. We did market analysis, we consulted people, and it was very unusual for us over here that it didn’t leak out to the media. It was the best kept secret in racing. Yesterday it was on the front page: racing bombshell. It has a charisma all its own, this race, and that’s why we called it The Everest: the peak, and it’s got so many marketing components, it’s great.

KR: Whereas the Pegasus was placed to allow colts to get to studs in time for the breeding season, the placement of The Everest makes it so colts wouldn’t be able to retire to stud and cover a full book. Was this taken into consideration, and do you think this could be a positive for racing’s image by keeping star colts in training longer?

PV: It’s a positive for us because one major investor has come out and said they may keep their horses going for another 12 months rather than taking them to stud, which for us as the racing industry is great, to have those great horses still racing is a benefit.

KR: The Everest won’t be a black-type race in its first year. What is the process for receiving black-type in Australia, and subsequently reaching Group 1 level?

PV: We’ve haven’t made an application for it at this point. We wanted to get the concept up and going and then look at group and listed [status]. To the general public it doesn’t matter if it’s a Group 1; for the purists and the trainers and the stud books, etc, it does, but for us we’re using this for marketing. The normal person wouldn’t really know what a Group 1 or a maiden is. So we decided we’ll establish it, and then we’ll look at making it a Group 1 race in the future.

You’ve got to establish the race first and foremost and you’ve got to get the ratings. I think in America they swapped an existing Grade I race [the Donn H.]. We haven’t really looked into it too much here because we were just ensuring the concept worked first and foremost.

KR: And you’ll consider selling more than 12 slots if the interest is there?

PV: Correct. And what we’d do is put it back into the prizemoney. So if we were to sell two more slots it would become A$-11.2 million. And naturally we’d do that in agreement with the other slot holders, because we wouldn’t want someone thinking it’s 12 and then it goes to 14. We always want to be transparent.

KR: How much interest have you had from potential investors thus far, and did you float the idea past industry stakeholders before announcing it to test its viability?

PV: We’ve had a number of people seeking to be included in the expressions of interest, which is great. We haven’t even gone out on the road yet. It’s a very positive response. We analysed it with a couple of major players and they were extremely positive and thought we could sell the 12 slots quite easily. We did the market analysis and consulted in people we could trust that it wouldn’t leak out and they kept our confidence, including some of our leading trainers, owners and others.

KR: Australian sprinters have always been expected to travel overseas to prove their mettle. Do you think we could see the reverse here, where the best sprinters from other nations come to Australia for the world’s richest sprint race?

PV: That’s what we’re hoping. We’re better on our home ground. We go pretty good traveling but when you’re on your home ground you’re even better, aren’t you, so it’s about time they started coming on our home ground. And then we’ll beat them here as well!

KR: You said in your comments announcing The Everest that it would help promote racing to a wider audience. Are there marketing plans already in place to reach mainstream audiences?

PV: We’ve put a budget aside naturally for The Everest, and we will promote it in a big way. The beauty of the race and the concept is that it will generate its own publicity. We’re big into the social media and we’re investing a lot in our social media. For example LinkedIn, which is all the professional people, we’re going to market very hard through there. They’re the ones that have the higher disposable income and they’re the sort of customers that we’re looking to get into racing.

KR: You touched on it a little bit already but the race name, The Everest–how did you land on that?

PV: What’s the peak? We looked at The Pinnacle, we looked at a couple other things, and we said what’s the highest peak? The highest peak is The Everest–you’ve got to climb The Everest to get there. There’s a saying in Australia, if something’s too hard, you say it’s like climbing Everest. The peak of racing is going to be The Everest.

« Last Edit: 2017-Feb-04, 09:03 AM by Authorized »

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Feb-01, 11:35 AM Reply #1 »

Royal Randwick to host $10m Everest sprint at Spring Carnival — making it the richest race on turf

SYDNEY will host the world’s richest thoroughbred race on turf with the introduction of the $10 million The Everest to be run at Royal Randwick during October.

The Everest is set to attract the best racehorses from around the world for the 1200m sprint.

Racing NSW chief executive Peter V’landys confirmed the $10 million race will be run on October 14 during Sydney’s spring carnival.

The Everest’s $10 million stakes money replaces the $6.2 million Melbourne Cup as the nation’s richest race.

The only races with more prizemoney are the $US12 million Pegasus World Cup run in Florida and the $US10 million Dubai World Cup. Both of those northern hemisphere races are run on dirt tracks.

The Everest will be run over 1200m at famous Royal Randwick under weight-for-age conditions.

Australian sprinters are generally regarded as among the best in the world but have needed to travel overseas to race at England’s Royal Ascot or Hong Kong’s Sha Tin to prove themselves.

Over the last decade or so Australian champions like Black Caviar, Takeover Target, Miss Andretti and Chautauqua have travelled to the northern hemisphere and beaten the best in the world.

But The Everest now provides an opportunity for Aussie sprinters to race in their own backyard and take on the best overseas sprinters.

The massive prizemoney for The Everest will be predominantly funded by a huge entry fee of around $600,000.

The field will have a maximum of 12 runners and those buying an entry secure a start in the race. This entry can be leased or on-sold to others wanting to race for The Everest’s huge prizemoney and prestige.

WORLD’S RICHEST HORSE RACES

$US12 million — Pegasus World Cup — Gulfstream Park, Florida.

$US10 million — Dubai World Cup, Dubai, UAE

$10 million — The Everest — Royal Randiwck, Sydney

$6.2 million — Melbourne Cup — Flemington, Melbourne

LIKELY CONTENDERS FOR THE EVEREST

Chautauqua

Astern

Flying Artie

Speith

Extreme Choice

Star Turn

Fell Swoop

Malaguerra

#Plus overseas entries


Offline turfdeli

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« 2017-Feb-01, 12:31 PM Reply #2 »
I can't see this concept working, there won't be enough local horses willing to fork out that sort of money to enter, and doubt overseas horses will want to come all this way for a sprint - especially not when Australian sprinters are normally better.

"The massive prizemoney for The Everest will be predominantly funded by a huge entry fee of around $600,000"

Does that mean if they only get 4 entries they will fill out the other $8 Million dollars to make up the prize pool?

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Feb-01, 01:31 PM Reply #3 »
The appropriate clause is -

The field will have a maximum of 12 runners and those buying an entry secure a start in the race. This entry can be leased or on-sold to others wanting to race for The Everest’s huge

It is basically a gamble.


Offline theJudge

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« 2017-Feb-01, 03:03 PM Reply #4 »
I can't see this concept working, there won't be enough local horses willing to fork out that sort of money to enter, and doubt overseas horses will want to come all this way for a sprint - especially not when Australian sprinters are normally better.

"The massive prizemoney for The Everest will be predominantly funded by a huge entry fee of around $600,000"

Does that mean if they only get 4 entries they will fill out the other $8 Million dollars to make up the prize pool?

Likely buyers would be studs?

Godolphin/ Coolmore/ China Horse Club/ Newgate Farm/ Arrowfield/ Singo&Harvey all possible buyers??

They then could do stud/entries to race deals with perspective 2yo colts?

Offline sobig

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« 2017-Feb-01, 04:16 PM Reply #5 »
I would think the ATC and Racing NSW would have sounded out major players before the announcement.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2017-Feb-01, 06:23 PM Reply #6 »
Ray Thomas's list of contenders for this race are just stabs in the dark ........already connections of  two of the contenders Ray listed have indicated there are other options .......meanwhile south of the border the V'Landys' cheer squad didn't get a look in with Bruce Clarke on G1X asking some pertinent questions that escaped the attention of the NSW scribes.

https://www.g1x.com.au/news/racing/10-questions-to-climb-everest


Giddy Up :beer:


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« 2017-Feb-01, 06:27 PM Reply #7 »
I would think the ATC and Racing NSW would have sounded out major players before the announcement.

Exactly right sobig.

Let's see how the concept goes before the typical kneejerk reaction of bagging anything "new" or anything "Racing NSW/V'Landys".

If it (the concept) works, imagine a race worth perhaps even more over 2000m at Flemington in the Spring and the field it would attract.

Winx vs. "The World". No need for her to go overseas.

Offline nemisis

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« 2017-Feb-01, 06:51 PM Reply #8 »
 Listening to ABC drive today re The Everest and Ray Thomas was the go to opinion man.

For Ray Thomas to be introduced as a racing editor therefore suggesting some degree of impartiality is just plain ridiculous.
According to Ray it's all good, won't cost the industry a cent and the race will flow on beautifully into the Melbourne carnival.

Ray Thomas earns a fair slice of his salary from Sky Racing, who are under contract to say nothing negative about the industry, so well done Ray!

 

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:01 PM Reply #9 »
Exactly right sobig.

Let's see how the concept goes before the typical kneejerk reaction of bagging anything "new" or anything "Racing NSW/V'Landys".

If it (the concept) works, imagine a race worth perhaps even more over 2000m at Flemington in the Spring and the field it would attract.

Winx vs. "The World". No need for her to go overseas.

My trouble is the elitism of the concept.

It's just basically the rich kids playing among themselves as the cost would be prohibitive to all but a select few.

Offline turfdeli

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:12 PM Reply #10 »
Actually happy to stick by my knee jerk reaction, this announcement today is a perfect example of everything that is WRONG with racing.   A single body working without consultation or care for the industry at a national level introduces an exclusive race solely for vested interests.

Compare what is happening in other sports:
- the AFL broadens appeal by introducing a women's league that is buzzing with publicity and interest in the general public. The AFL opens up new markets.
- cricket has Big Bash with more family appeal and cheaper tickets that has a whole new generation buzzing about cricket. Cricket opens up new markets.

Meanwhile, racing introduces a exclusive race solely for the vested interests of large studs.

There is no benefit to racing in the slightest - it merely is a competition for big studs to spend large amounts to compete against each other.

It does nothing to bring new owners into the sport, or make the existing owners more interested, it is purely for the big studs.
It does nothing to introduce racing to new crowds or new generations to arrest the long standing decline in interest.
It simply re-inforces the view that racing administration is out of touch with owners, punters and racegoers, and racing is an elite club run by the administrators for themselves and vested interests.

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:12 PM Reply #11 »
My trouble is the elitism of the concept.

It's just basically the rich kids playing among themselves as the cost would be prohibitive to all but a select few.

It probably is "elitist", just like the people who get feted to attend the Magic Millions and spend untold amounts of money, or the celebrities and "the rich" who get special treatment at the Flemington Carnival in the restricted entry areas.

Elitism? Racing? Gimme a break Gin.   :lol:

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:14 PM Reply #12 »
Actually happy to stick by my knee jerk reaction, this announcement today is a perfect example of everything that is WRONG with racing.   A single body working without consultation or care for the industry at a national level introduces an exclusive race solely for vested interests.


So does your criticism extend to the Magic Millions TD?

Offline turfdeli

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:30 PM Reply #13 »
So does your criticism extend to the Magic Millions TD?

Magic Millions has a range of prices and the average owner can still participate - Flying Jess was bought for only $60,000 and has 20 owners. There are still 100s if not 1000s of owners who have shares in horses bought through those sales and have a chance to particpate. Though, from a punting point of view, never touch that meeting though as it is ridiculous.

The only horses that will be able to compete in "Everest" will be those owned or bought by large studs, it is racing by the rich and elite for the rich and elite. Even if your horse had won $1 Million you are not going to risk 60% of the winnings just to enter a race, when you can enter plenty of big races for close to nothing.

They should just go all the way and make it a crowd limit of 10 people too at a million dollars a head.

It does NOTHING to increase interest in racing amongst the general public, which is what racing so badly needs to stay relevant. Totally wrong priority.

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Feb-01, 09:59 PM Reply #14 »
Magic Millions has a range of prices and the average owner can still participate - Flying Jess was bought for only $60,000 and has 20 owners. There are still 100s if not 1000s of owners who have shares in horses bought through those sales and have a chance to particpate. Though, from a punting point of view, never touch that meeting though as it is ridiculous.

The only horses that will be able to compete in "Everest" will be those owned or bought by large studs, it is racing by the rich and elite for the rich and elite. Even if your horse had won $1 Million you are not going to risk 60% of the winnings just to enter a race, when you can enter plenty of big races for close to nothing.

They should just go all the way and make it a crowd limit of 10 people too at a million dollars a head.

It does NOTHING to increase interest in racing amongst the general public, which is what racing so badly needs to stay relevant. Totally wrong priority.

But isn't Magic Millions almost the same thing?

i.e. owners fund the increased prizemoney by way of entry fees, and it is limited to an elite set of owners - those that purchased horses at the MM sales?

When you say:

"The only horses that will be able to compete in "Everest" will be those owned or bought by large studs"

that is not entirely true, is it.

http://www.racingnsw.com.au/article-display/MAJOR-ANNOUNCEMENT--The-Everest-Worlds-Richest-Turf-Event/21815

I don't mind people criticising the concept. It is a free country.

But I will point out that it hasn't even been run yet, and would like to see some consistency in criticisms lest they be accused of duplicity.

I can imagine Victorians being upset at losing the richest race but feel that will only be a temporary measure.

Personally I would like to see how it goes before offering up an opinion.

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Feb-01, 10:08 PM Reply #15 »
An average racehorse owner is not an average person. Far from it.

Racing is an elitist sport.


Online PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Feb-01, 10:23 PM Reply #16 »
The date chosen is a "tell" I reckon.

2 or 3 weeks before the Coolmore Classic?

I can envisage that if the concept works, then we will see a second race in the series run along the same lines at the VRC carnival. Who knows. If it does work then maybe there will be a 1600m WFA race at Randwick same day leading into a rich 2000m WFA race at the VRC carnival?

Wouldn't surprise at all if the principal race clubs have already talked about it.

Manny Gelagotis is a fan:

Malaguerra is a horse that has no future at stud given he is a gelding and Manny Gelagotis, who operates as racing manager for his brother Peter, was clearly one who has applauded Racing NSW for their initiative.

"We've got two sprinters in Malaguerra and Illustrious Lad, who if their form warrants at the time, would be perfect for the race," he said.

"If you put up the money, you invariably get the best horse and we would definitely be looking at targeting the race if their form continues as it has been.

"We've got the best sprinters in the world here in Australia so why shouldn't we have a $10 million sprint race?

"We are always looking at the rest of the world and talking about how good they do things, how rich their races are.

"We've got the money here and well done to Racing NSW for putting it all together."


https://www.racing.com/news/2017-02-01/everest-to-force-stud-farms-rethink

Offline whispering

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« 2017-Feb-01, 10:41 PM Reply #17 »
You have to buy it in 3year packages.

What if its over subscribed? I see the big studs saying "we will give you a shot at this race, but also give us a share in the horse". Can realistically see Waller buying one as he can do the same.

We dont have 6 "world class" sprinters and spring means you'd have to be a good 3yo to win it. There are g1 sprints  in other countries a few weeks either side.

Why not up the autumn prize money and make a series of sprints that actually would help aus racing.

1200-1400-1600 championship? Win all 3 and get a few million? A battler might win it and thats always a good news story...

Or have millionaire shieks and racing administrators/stud owners have the keys to a 2.8 million dollar benefit hosted by racing nsw...


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« 2017-Feb-01, 10:49 PM Reply #18 »
Crown bet already have a market up

https://crownbet.com.au/racing/horse-racing/randwick/20171014/race-1-499193-19853031

Some of the international horses in the market a

Lady Aurelia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Aurelia

Acapulco

http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/211650/acapulco-set-for-return-to-royal-ascot

Limato

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limato

Peniaphobia
Aerovelocity
Lucky Bubbles (who actually started out here with Bjorn Baker before going to HK and ran 2nd to Chautauqua in the big sprint over there)

Offline whispering

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« 2017-Feb-01, 11:28 PM Reply #19 »
Sportsbet do too and winx is favourite.

If i had to bet id go aith pakistan star and not listentome, i think the HKJC would have a tickrt into this? Some big whales from asia might target this race with a good one

Offline turfdeli

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« 2017-Feb-01, 11:56 PM Reply #20 »
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/superracing/the-everest-looms-as-a-10-million-climb-too-far/news-story/939052c3b7f685a47d689a0a1ea44951

Within minutes of Wednesday’s launch, The Everest was widely panned, mainly because it demands a $1.8 million commitment for a “slot’’ over three years and a loss of $425,000 for connections of horses that finish in the bottom half of the 12-horse field.

VRC chief executive Simon Love, leading owner Rupert Legh and top trainer Robbie Griffiths were among many who slammed the notion of a significant upfront payment and the prospect of emerging from the richest turf race in the world with a six-figure debt.

“We support anything that is new and innovative and good luck to them,’’ Love said. “But the three-year commitment, with the huge payment to be involved, is surely high risk.

Critics say the concept is pitched to racing’s elite and would be an impossible sell to large syndicates, who race many of our horses, including top sprinters.

“This might result in a heap of billionaires with runners and some of the best sprinters not even running because their owners refuse to pay such a ludicrous sum to compete,’’ one Victorian official said.

Trainer Robbie Griffiths isn’t convinced by the concept will be a winner. Pictu Mark Dadswell

Griffiths, who trains arguably our top sprinter in The Quarterback, said he doubted the horse’s owners could be convinced to fork out $600,000 for an initial crack at a race that could prove a poison chalice.

“Our sprinters don’t earn as much as stayers. The Quarterback has earned $1.8m. Do you really think the owners are going to put in six hundred grand with a risk of running bottom half and losing most of it?’’ he said.

Many of the star colts on this year’s wish list — Flying Artie, Extreme Choice and Astern — are likely to already be at stud by the time the race is run, to earn up to $10 million in their first season of breeding.

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Feb-02, 03:56 AM Reply #21 »
A Victorian newspaper saying it has been widely panned, quoting 3 Victorians.

Do a search on "Everest race" in Google - cannot see too much "panning". In fact it looks like it has been pretty well accepted.

It is a bold experiment. It might not work, but what is the point of bagging it before it is even tried?

Having a 3200m handicap for B-Grade stayers as your richest race - maybe that needs to be addressed. Year after year it seems to be won by pretty ordinary horses. Maybe Simon Love should embrace the idea and try and help out so that we can see some of the very best horses from around the world out here in Melbourne in the Spring instead of sending marketing people out all over the world to fawn over trainers to get horses out here for the Melbourne Cup, which, quite frankly, would struggle to win a listed staying event in Australia.

Online fours

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« 2017-Feb-02, 04:44 AM Reply #22 »
Hmmm,

The 3 years payment up front squarely makes this an attempted 'closed shop' publicity stunt for the players big enough to cough up that amount whilst keeping out the riff raff.

Sometimes such behaviour is illegal by the way - abuse of market power and such.

Fours

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Feb-02, 06:44 AM Reply #23 »
It probably is "elitist", just like the people who get feted to attend the Magic Millions and spend untold amounts of money, or the celebrities and "the rich" who get special treatment at the Flemington Carnival in the restricted entry areas.

Elitism? Racing? Gimme a break Gin.   :lol:

But PP you or I can go to the MM and spend a small amount for a share and get in on the ground level. The only exclusion to that race series is where the horse was brought from.

The entry fee is well beyond the reach of the vast majority of owners / horses.

Offline j.r.b.

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« 2017-Feb-02, 07:45 AM Reply #24 »
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/superracing/the-everest-looms-as-a-10-million-climb-too-far/news-story/939052c3b7f685a47d689a0a1ea44951

Griffiths, who trains arguably our top sprinter in The Quarterback, said he doubted the horse’s owners could be convinced to fork out $600,000 for an initial crack at a race that could prove a poison chalice.


Who is "our"?


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