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The Final Race 7.30 - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: The Final Race 7.30  (Read 41099 times)

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Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-18, 07:47 PM Reply #25 »


Note, that both Racing Australia, as well as the Breeders Association concur with me.

So why haven't they already implemented one?

It's not like we didn't know this was coming .....

Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-18, 08:00 PM Reply #26 »
I'm fully entitled to have a beef against him, but I stick to valid criticism based on facts.

We saw him less than comfortable during a lengthy interview.

But urged on by his partner of their mutual admiration society he spun a web of fantasy.

I saw the 7.30 way different than you.

I imagine no footage of animals being slaughtered can look pretty and I'm not sure I saw any malpractices on the show. But I don't know nearly enough about the process.

Pretty sure what was described as kicking a horse's head was not some act of wanton cruelty, rather the safest way of preforming the pedoeuvre.

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-18, 08:01 PM Reply #27 »
c/racenet

David Pfieffer responds to 7.30's - The Final Race


Warwick Farm trainer David Pfieffer says disappointment is an “understatement” as to how he feels the ABC portrayed him on their 7.30 program on Thursday night.

The show revealed disturbing revelations of ex-racehorses being sold for slaughter with confronting footage of the treatment of thoroughbreds in the program ‘The Final Race’.

ABC investigative journalist Caro Meldrum-Hanna contacted Pfieffer regarding two former horses he trained, Tahitian Black and Next Of Kin, that she claimed had met with death at the Burns Pet Food knackery at Riverstone.

Pfieffer sent a letter to his owners and clients on Friday explaining that both horses “as all horses' we train, were found nice homes at the end of their racing careers”.

“Tahitian Black was retired over three years ago and spent two years in a paddock owned by my foreperson before being rehomed as a show horse in the Gulgong area,” he said.

“Next Of Kin went to Vanderville Farm and was looked after by Nikki Rodgers who is very well known in equestrian circles.

“The horse was then rehomed to embark on a dressage career.

“Pfieffer Racing, without fail, finds decent homes for all of our retired racehorses' — a fact we are proud of.

“My family are animal lovers and my daughter has ponies and competes regularly.

“I was more than happy to co-operate with the ABC as I knew I had done nothing wrong.

“To say I am disappointed in the way the ABC edited their interview with me is an understatement and it is a matter I intend to take further.”

Meanwhile, Australia’s biggest trainer Chris Waller expressed shock and disappointment at the program, stating the industry needs to continue to improve in the area of horse welfare.

"It was a shock to me to tell you the truth. A huge majority are trying to be pro-active in these modern times," Waller told RSN.

“We are fully aware of animal welfare and we are probably the biggest animal lovers of all. To see a few people letting the industry down, it’s pretty damning.

"Whether it’s directly or not, we still need to be responsible for it and we’ve got to be accountable as to every horse that leaves our stable and obviously there's a gap that need looking at."

"The people that are harsh to animals, whether it be a racehorse, or whether it be a hobby horse or any animal, they need to be dealt with.

“I think the powers that be need to come down on them hard and it’s the only way it will stop."






Not sure anyone should be surprised that the ABC and this reporter in particular would twist a story to suit  :whistle:


Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-18, 08:10 PM Reply #28 »
So why haven't they already implemented one?

It's not like we didn't know this was coming .....
Who knows?

If they were really serious about solving the problem they would have, because without that there are always loopholes available for exploitation.

But from what I've seen today from the many responses they prefer obfuscation and spin.

McCormack wins hands down for the most disgusting effort. Boasting that he hadn't seen the show! That's has inexcusable as it gets, considering he knew he would performing and didn't bother with that easy basic research.

Online wily ole dog

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« 2019-Oct-18, 08:50 PM Reply #29 »
I'm fully entitled to have a beef against him, but I stick to valid criticism based on facts.

We saw him less than comfortable during a lengthy interview.

But urged on by his partner of their mutual admiration society he spun a web of fantasy.

I saw the 7.30 way different than you.

I imagine no footage of animals being slaughtered can look pretty and I'm not sure I saw any malpractices on the show. But I don't know nearly enough about the process.

Pretty sure what was described as kicking a horse's head was not some act of wanton cruelty, rather the safest way of preforming the pedoeuvre.

Oh come on. What, you never saw the poor horses kicked and physically abused and having gates slammed into their heads. Some died a horrific slow death

With the greatest respect, It was seen by all except if you had blinkers on.

I gather you were happy with the way the horses were treated at the Abottoir?

Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-18, 09:07 PM Reply #30 »
Perhaps they should engage horse whisperers to calm the creatures prior to slaughter?

I don't know whether there was malpractice or just stuff that can happen in a dangerous situation.

I don't know whether this is correct but it also differs from your view.


Offline Shogun Lodge

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« 2019-Oct-18, 09:13 PM Reply #31 »
Anyone...anyone ...who has any interest, involvement or even half baked idea regards this industry knows this exact thing has been going on forever.
It is our dirty little secret.
The second horse I ever raced 'disappeared'...when he was no good...arranged by trainer...
We all know there are no well supervised slaughtermen, well designed facilities, professional staff or process.
We all know these nags are apparent at every country horse sale...
We all know "the doggers" circle and pounce on the pound of flesh when it becomes cheap enough
We all know the numbers bred can never be absorbed by recreational industry, nor would you want that anyways after being trained so restrictively as a racehorse.
The answer if we want to continue racing and grow?
Highly regulated breeding and racing industry...breeding numbers down to 3000 or so....add 50 grand to price of every horse for after career care...which is what it takes for every horse on average...
Financially viable?
Probably not.
Still..it is supposed to be the sport of kings, right?

Online wily ole dog

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Offline Wenona

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« 2019-Oct-18, 09:14 PM Reply #33 »
The most disturbing thing in the show to me was the treatment of the animals from the point they left the racing industry, particularly at the abattoir.

Online wily ole dog

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« 2019-Oct-18, 09:17 PM Reply #34 »
Anyone...anyone ...who has any interest, involvement or even half baked idea regards this industry knows this exact thing has been going on forever.
It is our dirty little secret.
The second horse I ever raced 'disappeared'...when he was no good...arranged by trainer...
We all know there are no well supervised slaughtermen, well designed facilities, professional staff or process.
We all know these nags are apparent at every country horse sale...
We all know "the doggers" circle and pounce on the pound of flesh when it becomes cheap enough
We all know the numbers bred can never be absorbed by recreational industry, nor would you want that anyways after being trained so restrictively as a racehorse.
The answer if we want to continue racing and grow?
Highly regulated breeding and racing industry...breeding numbers down to 3000 or so....add 50 grand to price of every horse for after career care...which is what it takes for every horse on average...
Financially viable?
Probably not.
Still..it is supposed to be the sport of kings, right?


Sorry, shogun,
 As much as I have respected your many views I can’t even contemplate some of the above. Pure madness. You clearly want to kill of the industry with those proposals and emotive language

The language tells me you haven’t thought it through

Online wily ole dog

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« 2019-Oct-18, 09:21 PM Reply #35 »
The most disturbing thing in the show to me was the treatment of the animals from the point they left the racing industry, particularly at the abattoir.


Wenona that’s not the motivation of the “story”. Don’t be fooled that this is about animal welfare. We’ve even seen our own JFC suggest that physically abusing, kicking and attacking the poor animals is okay :sad:

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-18, 10:30 PM Reply #36 »
The most disturbing thing in the show to me was the treatment of the animals from the point they left the racing industry, particularly at the abattoir.

It should be the focus but some how the racing industry is  :shrug:

Offline Shogun Lodge

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« 2019-Oct-19, 06:33 AM Reply #37 »
OK Wiles...tell me exactly which sentence is wrong.
Head in the sand, like many of us here.
Like all the trainers pretending they are shocked, like all the do gooders trying to make us believe they know where old Harold the first horse they trained is, happily domiciled at age 23.
Absolute crap.
The whole industry knows this has happened for eons and we all have kept our mouths shut.
If you do not think thousands of slow ones are disposed of every year, you are not thinking clearly.
Hell, even good ones get knocked.
The industry will never get wide spread approval unless this issue is fixed.
It is the Achilles heel...(along with whipping )...we breed em , treat em like champs until they prove they are not, fine...then, on many occasions, we dispose of em and forget about them.
If participants don't get that they need to do better then they will ride this industry slide all the way.
The administrators are bullshit artists regards this, and most of the public are not dumb enough to swallow the PR welfare nonsense...token farms, token systems..
They do not know what to do.
Hong Kong style regulation, number setting etc combined with publically available register of racehorse's address until death...
The multiple thousand dollar bond for after career care should help as well.
Oh, the screaming!

Online wily ole dog

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« 2019-Oct-19, 07:15 AM Reply #38 »
Sorry Shogie, I’m off to my daughters spirts I will reply later but 5he first thing to jump out at it is your last Line. “The multiple thousand dollar bond for after career care should help as well“

That sounds massively different to the $50,000 you wanted last night

Offline Shogun Lodge

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« 2019-Oct-19, 07:21 AM Reply #39 »
C'mon Wiles, that's what you pick up on?
Pedantic approach mate..
I will state it again...50 grand is what would be required...say 15 years at $3500 per annum.
My ex racehorse, now 17 years old, would cost me that...lucerne now $37 per bale at local CRT store!
Good article link below...

Note suggestion regards lifelong tracking via blockchain technology...interesting.
Lee Freedman seems depressed by it all...croc tears or ignorant? You decide....

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-19/racehorses-slaughter-melbourne-cup-the-everest-racing-industry/11618590

See also https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-18/jockey-laura-cheshire-says-she-failed-after-horse-slaughtered/11618258
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-19, 07:27 AM by Shogun Lodge »

Online Jeunes

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« 2019-Oct-19, 07:27 AM Reply #40 »
The worst part of the whole issue is the perception of some racing enthusiasts and administrators, it is a beat up by the activists and ABC.

The racing industry including Racing NSW have lived in an insular world where they have been protected by the Racing media or their allies. When they lose the protection, it is to shoot the messenger without looking at the message.

They are very lucky, it was not broadcast on Monday and thus before the barrier draw on Tuesday. How many Sydneysiders excluding the racing people would have welcomed a rich race and its barrier draw on the Bridge after the revelations.

Vlandys will get his crowd on Saturday and I am not sure if it will be a sellout or not. His provincial / regional races after the Rosehill Eagle will be a sell out but I don’t think in between will be.

The uncomfortable questions will be why raise the prize money in the future if you cannot look after its horses.

The fallacy of looking after a racehorse after its career is financially fundamentally flawed. A racehorse usually has 2-4 years racing on average. But after there is a potential to live into their mid 20s. Not every horse is a show horse or pony club etc. Thus what do you with them? It is like selling a car, you know the first buyer but no one after that.

Does the public expect the all the ex racehorses to live on a property after they raced and not being sent to an abattoir? Emotionally yes. That is the issue Racing authorities now face.

Vlandys better get used to the hard questions as there will be a follow up report and he will not be able to control it. The league media will be taking notes too waiting till he takes over.

Racing is one of the biggest industries in Australia but unlike the hardened punters who will still punt, the social racegoers are more fickle.

Offline Shogun Lodge

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« 2019-Oct-19, 07:31 AM Reply #41 »
Well said Jeunes.
ABC did a top job.
I repeat...everybody knew this was going on...if you reckon you didn't you are either a fool or deluded.
The numbers have always been clear...
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-18/horse-racing-industry-responds-abc-investigation-animal-welfare/11615070
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-19, 07:33 AM by Shogun Lodge »

Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-19, 07:43 AM Reply #42 »
Just stumbled over this which should be of particular interest to those concerned about the activists.

Are there any key differences between it and the relevant views of Racing Australia and the TBA?

https://horseracingkills.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Coalition-for-the-Protection-of-Racehorses-submission.pdf

Offline nemisis

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« 2019-Oct-19, 08:23 AM Reply #43 »
I thought it was a well researched program.

The word had been around for some time about this but the footage from Camden Sales, Luddenham and Burns pet meats was more recent.

The reason this was added was to stop RNSW doing exactly what they are saying that these are not NSW horses.

P V'Landys was being challenged on his 1% figure and that's why he looked so uncomfortable because he knows it's BS......let's not even mention J Dumesny feeble effort.

Hard watching that very handsome, beautifully bred Starspangledbanner stallion National Flag being auctioned off at meat price at Camden.

No-one from RNSW or Racing Vic gets along to these sales and the brand identification is generally done by some dedicated souls trying to do the best for now unwanted animals.

Online arthur

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« 2019-Oct-19, 09:06 AM Reply #44 »
Have to agree with Shogie . .



Vaguely remember a horse by the name of "Canapal" or "Tinopal" or somesuch

Nothing like that will be approved henceforth

Online Jeunes

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« 2019-Oct-19, 10:13 AM Reply #45 »
SMH article. Emotive but does touch a few sore points.

Bubbles and butchery: The real price of your day at the races


They watched with champagne flute in hand as the horse collapsed in his stall, a brilliant, sunlit afternoon in the Birdcage suddenly darkened by the grim reality of racing.
Admire Rakti, one of the favourites for that day's Melbourne Cup, was near death, panicked stablehands were at a loss what to do and on the marquee balcony overlooking this scene, the dapper dressed and neatly coiffed could not avert their eyes.

Whether at Flemington, Randwick or today’s Caulfield Cup, death is never far from a racecourse.
Some deaths, such as the acute cardiac failure which killed Admire Rakti shortly after the 2014 Melbourne Cup, are upsetting but are generally accepted as part of a dangerous sport. Other deaths, such as those documented in grisly detail by Thursday night’s 7.30 program on ABC, can’t be accepted by anyone.
Advertisement

They are happening nonetheless, at remote properties at the end of dusty, country roads where trucks carrying ex-racehorses go in and vans carrying pet mince come out.
Think on that this morning as you head to the track with more money in your pocket than those wretched horses were worth at the end of their lives.

Think on it as you nibble on that tasty morsel at the track. Fancy a bit of horse tartare? It’s quite the delicacy in parts of Belgium, where they wash down paardenfilet, or horse steak, with the local beer, Stella Artois, major sponsor of the Caulfield Cup.
Think on it some more as you head home. Whether you’ve had a good day on the punt or done your dough, whether you’ve lived it large in a marquee or moshed it on the lawn, racing’s big problem remains. It’s a problem that only starts after the final race is run and the last of the day’s drunks are poured into the back seat of a taxi.

According to 10-year records kept by Racing Australia, an average of 14,793 thoroughbreds are foaled in Australia every year. The average racing career of these horses is two to four years and the natural lifespan for a horse is up to 30 years.
You can do the maths. Unless they are being slaughtered, euthanised or otherwise disposed off in scandalous numbers, there are at any given time hundreds of thousands of Australian racehorses living beyond the single purpose for which they were bred.
Are there enough suitable second homes for so many horses? Nikki Cook believes the racing industry is doing nowhere near enough to make sure there are.
Cook runs Shory Park, a eight-hectare rehoming centre for ex-racehorses on the outskirts of Geelong. She takes in horses, usually donated for free by breeders, trainers and owners, lets them unwind in a big paddock, then retrains them for life after racing: how to jump; how to perform dressage; how to stay calm beneath inexperienced riders.

Most find new homes at pony clubs, where parents are discovering that a big ex-racehorse, once properly retrained, is perfectly safe for a child to ride. Others are saddled up for commercial trail rides or put to other suitable uses people have for a strong, healthy horse.
She says her business is the largest of its kind in Australia and takes in about 100 horses a year. She finds homes for all of them, one way or another. If she can’t find a new buyer, she lets them live out their lives at Shory Park.

"They have all got their place and they can all be found a home," she says. "It is a matter of putting in an effort and some time and a bit of love."
Cook says the problem isn’t racing; she has worked at racing stables and says they treat their horses better than some people treat their kids. The problem is what happens beyond the finishing post.

“People need to be aware that like a dog, where you have it till it dies, it’s the same with a horse. You are responsible for that creature the whole way through its life. It’s an important factor to think about and some people don’t when they buy horses. There needs to be more funding for after racing.”
Racing Victoria has identified rehoming horses as a pressing, growing issue for the sport. In August this year, it announced that 1 per cent of all prize money would go towards improving equine welfare. Cook says the investment is well intended but the money doesn’t go where it is needed most.


“From the moment they drop on the ground as a foal, there needs to be more in place for them. That 1 per cent helps but it needs to be put directly towards that horse. They need to have a kitty for the horse when it does retire and comes to someone like me.”
She says there also needs to be much closer monitoring of what happens to horses at the end of their racing careers.

ABC's 7.30 found examples where horses listed by Racing Australia as still active in racing had been slaughtered earlier at a knackery. At Shory Park, the inverse applies. Cook has horses alive and well in her paddocks who are listed by Racing Australia as deceased.
All thoroughbreds are microchipped. If the technology available was properly employed, the racing industry would track every horse throughout its life. Instead, the requirement for ownership details to be updated when a horse change hands are loosely enforced, if at all.

Once horses leave racing, any duty of care owed by their breeders, former owners and trainers is scratched. As a sport and an industry, horse racing devotes neither the time nor money needed to properly protect the welfare of its retired athletes. Cook says this is exacerbated by the overbreeding of all horses, not just racehorses.
Australia would need 150 Shory Parks to rehome all thoroughbreds foaled in a single year.

The slaughter of racehorses is not unique to Australia.

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals estimates that every year, about 80,000 American-bred horses are trucked north into Canada and south into Mexico. Once there, they are butchered and exported to European countries such as Belgium, where prime cuts of horsemeat fetch a higher price than beef.
The US Senate is currently debating the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act, a proposed law designed to stop the human consumption of horses. In Australia, there are no national laws and no proposed legislation to prevent retired racehorses being minced.
Cook was appalled by the footage broadcast by the ABC showing horses being treated cruelly by abattoir workers. She says there are circumstances where racehorses, like all animals, need to be euthanised. There are none she can see where a live horse should be sent to knackery.

“People in the industry do it as an easy option or for quick cash. To me, they are not real horse people.”
Quick cash. There’ll be plenty at Caulfield today. Mountains of it at The Everest in Sydney. While we’re counting it, the cost should also be clear.

Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-19, 10:26 AM Reply #46 »
Author?

Thought it might be this SNAG but he's instead fretting about foul language in slaughterhouses.

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/racing-gone-to-the-dogs-in-appalling-self-sustaining-circle-of-cruelty-20191018-p53225.html

Online Jeunes

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« 2019-Oct-19, 10:52 AM Reply #47 »
Author?

Thought it might be this SNAG but he's instead fretting about foul language in slaughterhouses.

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/racing-gone-to-the-dogs-in-appalling-self-sustaining-circle-of-cruelty-20191018-p53225.html

Chip Le Grand is the author.

News Corp and associated papers have no coverage of the issue but have saturated coverage of the Everest. Fairfax has more coverage of the issue.

Offline Shogun Lodge

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« 2019-Oct-19, 11:08 AM Reply #48 »
Sir Laponac, was the horse...owned by some ratbags I know incidentally...not sure where he ended up...but his name may have determined his fate!
Raced out of Murwillumbah...
Owners thought his name was a real lark!

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-19, 11:49 AM Reply #49 »
Author?

Thought it might be this SNAG but he's instead fretting about foul language in slaughterhouses.

https://www.smh.com.au/sport/racing-gone-to-the-dogs-in-appalling-self-sustaining-circle-of-cruelty-20191018-p53225.html

I wouldn't put any credence in what that agenda driven flunky says.

After being pointed out his mistakes regarding the greyhound industry instead of owning up and either correcting himself or saying sorry he simply blocks / deletes people and carrying on pushing the agenda. He's a fraud of the highest order.  :thumbsd:

Even reading his dribble about dog food like it's some sort of crime, what's his solution? Do I feed the Cavilers & the old girl tofu FFS?   :shutup:
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-19, 11:56 AM by Gintara »


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