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Online jfc

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« 2019-Oct-26, 04:02 PM Reply #25 »
How come Tom is the only one with Turnover data?

Caulfield Cup day turnover suffered a significant hit last Saturday, dropping 24.6 per cent from $127.7 million in 2018 to $96.3 million, continuing a decline in turnover across the spring.

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/racing/credit-bans-taxes-to-blame-for-poor-turnover-waterhouse-20191024-p533yi.html

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2019-Oct-27, 12:35 PM Reply #26 »
How come Tom is the only one with Turnover data?

Caulfield Cup day turnover suffered a significant hit last Saturday, dropping 24.6 per cent from $127.7 million in 2018 to $96.3 million, continuing a decline in turnover across the spring.

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/racing/credit-bans-taxes-to-blame-for-poor-turnover-waterhouse-20191024-p533yi.html

Interesting comments from Waterhouse:

Instead, Waterhouse says additional taxes on bookmakers are having the greatest effect, as was the credit ban, which was introduced 18 months ago.

"We're getting into a fair way since the credit ban has been put in place, so you're seeing the impact of high roller turnover being significantly reduced," he said.

"On a Saturday, if you're having a good day or a bad day you might turn over a lot of money, but if you've got to deposit the day before, it's hard to deposit half a million dollars to bet up through the day."

Waterhouse agreed with Racing Victoria that increased taxes meant bookmakers were offering worse odds, something he believed could see punters turn to other sports.

"It was only four or five years ago that top fluc (fluctuation) would average in Sydney 105 per cent, now the top fluc is 116 per cent. It's a big difference in percentage," he said.

"I know the highest grossed sport with waging operators is basketball, NBA, and they have all that vision that's free and they have no tax on that product.

"A punter can turn over their money a lot more times because they've only got a couple of per cent against them but in racing, you've got 120 per cent against you most of the time now.


The golden days of bookie competition are well and truly over.

The takeout for racing wagering is way too high - unless of course you are getting rebates.

But the state governments like to view gambling in the same way as smoking i.e. vermin filth so we will tax them what we like. I reckon it will get worse in the long run.

Online jfc

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« 2019-Nov-01, 01:54 PM Reply #27 »
Apparently Tabcorp can't handle alternate facts.


Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Nov-01, 02:25 PM Reply #28 »
Tom was turfed when he didn't deliver what he was invited to do....serves him right.

Giddy Up :beer:

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2019-Nov-01, 02:36 PM Reply #29 »
Very funny listening

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2019-Nov-01, 03:20 PM Reply #30 »
Tom was turfed when he didn't deliver what he was invited to do....serves him right.


He also had a right to ask why (and comment on) the decision to pull the previous arrangement.

Offline sobig

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« 2019-Nov-01, 03:37 PM Reply #31 »
He has been told it was an error made by a producer.

Regardless of whether that was correct or not he was not going to get anywhere and had been asked not to comment further.

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2019-Nov-01, 04:08 PM Reply #32 »
No, he obviously wasn't satisfied with whatever excuse was made "junior "employee blah blah blah.

The question he obviously wants answered, as we should, is.
 
 "What strings did the TAB pull to have that previous arrangement changed?"

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Nov-01, 06:15 PM Reply #33 »
No, he obviously wasn't satisfied with whatever excuse was made "junior "employee blah blah blah.

The question he obviously wants answered, as we should, is.
 
 "What strings did the TAB pull to have that previous arrangement changed?"
Who cares  :beer:

Online jfc

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« 2019-Nov-03, 09:20 AM Reply #34 »
Plenty of emotive twitterbator ingrates after yesterday's dud free tip - Rosehill 1 #4 Faretti.

But his free tips have 4 from 9.

With proportional betting:

Tom +32.97%
BSP 21.49%


Online jfc

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« 2019-Nov-05, 04:26 AM Reply #35 »
Not clowning nor spruiking, for a change.

Interesting tips, plus industry overview.


Online PoisonPen7

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« 2020-Aug-19, 03:26 AM Reply #36 »
Hi there,

My son Tom has launched a Fund. I find his updates on the industry very interesting and thought I would share, I've attached his latest update below.

If you'd like to subscribe to his emails about the industry, click the button to be included.

_______________________________________________________________________________

See below for this month’s Waterhouse VC Gambling Fund newsletter.

The Fund specialises in gambling assets and businesses that are related to the gambling industry. We aim to leverage our unique expertise and existing assets to generate yield and capital growth for investors over the long-term.

Since inception, $100,000 invested in the Gambling Fund has risen to $322,570, as at 31 July 2020.

Selling picks and shovels in a gold rush

During the gold rushes of the mid-1800s in California and Australia, prospectors would head out to the goldfields every day, hoping to strike it rich. It was a high-risk, high-reward endeavour that drew in people from all over the world. Most lived a hard life and went home with nothing. Few struck it rich.

The people who really made a fortune were the traders who sold picks and shovels to the miners. Better to sell the tools to the dreamers - and get paid every time.

It’s a great lesson to keep in mind when investing in a booming industry.

In the US, competition in the wagering ‘gold rush’ continues to grow every month. Of course, there will be massive winners, but it’s not yet obvious who will strike it rich. The ‘pick and shovel traders’ in this context are the companies providing the tools needed by wagering companies to provide a betting experience for end customers.

Under the radar

Another reason you want to look for these companies is because they’re not as glamorous and rarely get the headlines that the customer-facing companies do. Sportradar is one of these.

The Swiss company partners with sports leagues like the NBA, NFL, NHL and many others to distribute unimaginable amounts of data to bookmakers around the world. This service is critical to sports leagues for monetising their product, and equally critical for bookmakers to offer a betting product to their customers. Sportradar pipes data from things like the finish time of a game (so no more bets can come in) to the names of individual players.

Sportradar also creates betting odds by feeding sports data into mathematical models. This is sold as odds suggestions to bookmakers who aren’t creating their own. For in-game betting, this requires constant recalculation of odds using live data collected by Sportradar.

In 2018, Sportradar was valued at approximately US$2.4 billion, and has probably appreciated significantly since then, in line with the growth of the US market. Last month, the company was rumoured to be exploring plans to go public, so hopefully we’ll know soon how valuable picks and shovels really are.

The ‘Sportradar for horse racing’

BetMakers Technology is the horse racing equivalent, with their flagship Global Racing Network (GRN) product connecting racing authorities to wagering companies. GRN allows bookmakers to access racing content from around the world in a uniform data stream so that the racing content in their betting apps is consistent, whether it’s from Flemington or Fairmount Park.

It’s also great for the racing authorities who get direct access to the world’s largest wagering operators via a single integration with BetMakers. For example, Monmouth Park Racetrack in New Jersey had their product piped to “approximately 20 of the major operators globally within a matter of weeks” after signing with BetMakers, creating a revenue stream for both the racetrack and BetMakers.

The US has 87 thoroughbred race tracks and twice as many races each year than we have in Australia. Further, with no fixed odds racing in the US, the BetMakers GRN is well placed to continue winning exclusive agreements to connect racetracks and bookmakers.

For wholesale investors that want to follow gaming’s global growth, please follow us for updates on Twitter (@waterhousevc) or through our website WaterhouseVC.com.

All the best,

Tom

Offline Antitab#

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« 2020-Aug-19, 04:45 AM Reply #37 »

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2020-Sep-05, 12:03 PM Reply #38 »
Tom Waterhouse’s next big bet is funds management

Tom Waterhouse wants to be a funds manager.

He was once the face of online wagering in Australia, his name splashed across billboards, trains, trams and television promoting his eponymous TomWaterhouse.com brand.

After last year turning racing tipster rather than bet taker, Waterhouse has also turned his attention to another industry where plenty of money can be quickly made and lost: the stockmarket.

It might sound like an unlikely gamble, but the scion of one of racing’s best-known families wants to make it clear that this is not a story of overnight success, a meteoric rise that will suddenly see him emerge with hundreds of millions under management.

In an understated way, Waterhouse also warns not to bet against him.

“My long-term plan is to grow a retail funds under management business, but that’s about five years away. I’ll run a small wholesale fund for the next four or five years, get a good track record under my belt,” he tells The Weekend Australian.

“I have confidence I can get there. I’m doing what I would have done anyway with my investments, but I have put it in a fund and let people join me side-by-side.”

While he is also set to launch a betting aggregator business in time for the biggest races of the spring carnival, Waterhouse has quietly spent 12 months on his latest venture, stock picking in the industry he knows best: gambling.

He has formed the Waterhouse VC wholesale gambling investment fund, open for investors who put in a minimum of $100,000 and almost completely focused on buying gambling or wagering services stocks listed on the ASX or around the world.

An information memorandum reveals the fund is an unlisted unit trust and unregistered investment scheme available to wholesale investors only. A 2 per cent management fee is calculated monthly and a performance fee of 20 per cent applies “if the fund shows a positive return … subject to a high-water mark”.

The IM also stresses Waterhouse’s long-term involvement in the gambling industry, with both his own brand and then as chief executive of the Australian arm of global brand William Hill before its sale last year to The Stars Group. He is the son of renowned bookie Robbie and horse trainer Gai.

“The family’s experience, reputation and capital give it access to deals in the market that a normal fund manager would not appreciate or have access to,” the IM says.

“Tom Waterhouse will be a cornerstone investor in the Fund. To this end, investors would be putting money into deals that Tom is going into and at the same rate.”

Waterhouse is not willing to say how much he has poured into the fund or its size, other than to stress it is still relatively small and that it currently holds 10-12 stocks — three of which account for about 60 per cent of the portfolio.

As to whether he is qualified to pick stocks, Waterhouse says: “I’m putting my money where my mouth is. I know these businesses and I know the industry, I have lived and breathed it during my time at William Hill and seen what they do.

“I just want to basically run this fund and all the stuff that comes with that and the compliance that comes into it, put my efforts into that for the next four or five years and then people will say he’s been running this portfolio and he knows this space. We’re not going out there spruiking it. I’ve put a small team together and we’re working hard at it.” While $100,000 invested since its inception on August 1, 2019 was apparently worth $322,570 on July 31, according to the fund’s August report, Waterhouse says that sort of return in the longer term is obviously unrealistic.

But he is enthusiastic when discussing the merits of the gambling sector and his favourite stocks and industry trends.

“I like companies in regulated markets that are going to win the scale war. They’ve got the balance sheet, marketing budget and team size to be successful. We focus on online businesses. Those are the sorts of businesses I dealt with when I was at William Hill, so I think I know them well.”

One of Waterhouse’s picks is the ASX-listed Betmakers Technology Group, which has market capitalisation of almost $300m and surged six times in value in 12 months.

“They supply all this data to bookies, and Racing Victoria gets their integrity data from them, for example,” says Waterhouse. “If it wasn’t for their feed, the time and effort the bookies would have to make putting up their fixed odds (information) would be astronomical. These companies are important to the sector.

Waterhouse also likes the global giant Flutter Entertainment, the owner of the Paddy Power brand in Europe and the Sportsbet business in Australia. Flutter shares on the London Stock Exchange have more than doubled since mid-March and are up about 20 per cent since January 1.

His third big pick is Playtech, another London listing. It is a gambling software development company that provides software for online casinos, sports betting and other digital gaming companies. Playtech shares are worth roughly the same amount as a year ago, but have more than doubled since mid-March.

Stock-picking will always have its hard luck stories though, and ironically Waterhouse doesn’t hold the one company he has close connections to, Pointsbet.

The ASX-listed Pointsbet’s CEO, Sam Swanell, and several of his executives worked at TomWaterhouse.com, but Waterhouse has missed out on it increasing 10 times in value in six months and last week’s transformational deal to be NBC’s wagering partner across American sports.

In October, Waterhouse will also launch his betting aggregator service on TomWaterhouse.com, which is still operating a racing tips service. He says the aggregator will compare odds across several corporate bookmakers and allow customers to place bets with the wagering operator of their choice.

“I’m not sure how to monetise that part of the app yet but I think it has good potential,” Waterhouse says, comparing it to a service like Booking.com or Trivago that aggregates travel deals. “I just know if I create a part of the market that is a really easy place for punters to go I think I can find a way to monetise it.”

But he is equally excited about the funds management business, and the gambling industry overall.

“My focus for the next 10-20 years is just this sector and I want to invest in stuff that I like in this space.

“It is a sector with so much growth and economically it is such a large sector.”




https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/markets/tom-waterhouses-next-big-bet-is-funds-management/



“They supply all this data to bookies, and Racing Victoria gets their integrity data from them, for example

Geez I'd be scrutinizing that statement on a few fronts.   :lol:

Online fours

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« 2020-Sep-05, 12:26 PM Reply #39 »
Hmmm,

My read is that the tips part is expected to be a failure. The supply of suckers is in fact limited.

Takes very little nous to get a firm view on the gambling sector. Means the fees are outrageous.

Fours

Offline Gintara

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« 2020-Sep-05, 03:00 PM Reply #40 »
Betmakers is the reason you see most of the corps move and fluctuate at the same time, the main exception being B365 who run their own race.


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