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YOUR Questions of the FORUM - Racing Talk - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: YOUR Questions of the FORUM  (Read 463852 times)

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Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Sep-26, 07:54 PM Reply #25 »

Thewell

Just looked up one, Berber, and could only see his current trainer.

Maybe, I'm doing something wrong.

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Sep-26, 07:55 PM Reply #26 »

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Sep-27, 10:20 AM Reply #27 »
Is there a Qld Racing Jockey's table available?

I'm interested to see such a table covering all Qld meetings for last year, and this year to date. 

Offline gratlog

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« 2009-Sep-27, 10:50 AM Reply #28 »

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Sep-27, 11:23 AM Reply #29 »
Thanks Gratlog.

Just what the doctor ordered.  emthup

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Sep-27, 11:57 AM Reply #30 »
JWH, If you go to the RVL site and type in the horse you are thinking of, His full result will show up, just click on a race and it will tell you who trained and rode that horse in that race.

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2009-Sep-27, 12:11 PM Reply #31 »
  emthup

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 11:43 AM Reply #32 »
When a horse accelerates, does it do so:

1. By moving its legs faster?

2. By taking longer strides?

3. A mixture of both?

If anyone has credible data on this question, I'll be most grateful.

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Sep-28, 11:47 AM Reply #33 »
When a horse accelerates, does it do so:

1. By moving its legs faster?

2. By taking longer strides?

3. A mixture of both?

If anyone has credible data on this question, I'll be most grateful.

il SAY 2, Although 2 then contributes to 1, although it could be when the horses
head, Neck extends that makes them accelerate, hence the jocks pushing there heads down
in a finish, if there heads don't go down they go SLOWER
« Last Edit: 2009-Sep-28, 11:50 AM by Big Wheel »

Offline Authorized

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« 2009-Sep-28, 11:56 AM Reply #34 »
I'd say two as well. I remember when Vintage Crop won the cup,people were impressed by the way he lengthened stride when his jockey asked him for an effort.

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:01 PM Reply #35 »
I'd say two as well. I remember when Vintage Crop won the cup,people were impressed by the way he lengthened stride when his jockey asked him for an effort.
Yep i agree, i wasn't sure b4, but your post has me convinced it is 2

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:04 PM Reply #36 »
Was hoping someone would have some objective data on this.  I bet the vet physiology guys have done work on the topic. :chin:

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:04 PM Reply #37 »
It's both, but the lengthening of the stride would come from their legs moving faster.

Take a swing for example, it only gets higher, because you push it harder and faster  ;)


Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:04 PM Reply #38 »
Was hoping someone would have some objective data on this.  I bet the vet physiology guys have done work on the topic. :chin:

I do DD,

My swing analogy  :p

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:05 PM Reply #39 »
Ya talking about a pendulum, MagiC.  I cannot see the analogy. :no:

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:14 PM Reply #40 »
Was hoping someone would have some objective data on this.  I bet the vet physiology guys have done work on the topic. :chin:
Well we tried

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:15 PM Reply #41 »
OK, a horse gets all it's power from the back legs, through a pushing action.

So to move faster, the horse has to push faster with it's back legs before being able to flatten out, and increase it's stride.

It 's a combination of both, but moving the legs faster, comes first.

For example, when they come out of the barriers, a horse has to push from it's back legs before it can lengthen it's stride

The swing ananolg, was to making a point you have to push, to make the swing go higher DD, may not have been the best one .... lol

Make sense to me anyhow  :shy:

edit:
I basically think the front legs are more of a pivot point, before the back legs come back down, to push of again  :/

*Disclaimer, there is no scientific, basis to any of my claims  :whistle:
« Last Edit: 2009-Sep-28, 12:19 PM by MagiC~* »

Offline qwertyu1234567

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:16 PM Reply #42 »
Denman has a huge stride,
and both More than great & Run For Nara
were taking farrie like steps and pulling ground off him
the last 200m, so it can't be just no.2

Offline monologue

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:22 PM Reply #43 »
High-speed gallop locomotion in the Thoroughbred racehorse. I. The effect of incline on stride parameters

K. J. Parsons*, T. Pfau and A. M. Wilson

Structure and Motion Laboratory, The Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 7TA, UK

* Author for correspondence (e-mail: kparsons@rvc.ac.uk)

Accepted 10 November 2007

During locomotion up an incline, power is required to elevate the centre of mass. This is provided when the animal's limbs are in contact with the ground. Measurements of stride timing variables from multiple limbs during high speed, over-ground locomotion would enhance our understanding of locomotor powering during changes in terrain. This study measured foot-on and foot-off times from galloping horses using a previously validated system of limb-mounted accelerometers and a global positioning system data logger. A detailed track survey provided incline information from all areas of the track. Measurements were made from six horses over a speed range of 9 to 13 m s1. Foot-fall timings were used to calculate variables, which included stance duration, protraction duration, stride frequency and duty factor. The relationship between track incline and measured variables was assessed. Stride variables from horses galloping on level (02% incline) and incline (812% incline) sections of the track were compared. Fore- and hindlimb protraction durations were significantly reduced across the speed range during incline galloping (P=0.001). This resulted in a mean increase in stride frequency from 2.01 to 2.08 strides s1 at 9.5 m s1 and 2.10 to 2.17 strides s1 at 12.5 m s1 during incline galloping. Duty factor was significantly greater for the hindlimbs during incline galloping (P<0.001), increasing from 0.31 to 0.32 at 9.5 m s1 and 0.28 to 0.29 at 12.5 m s1. Peak limb force was calculated from duty factor and assumed fore- to hindlimb impulse distributions. Smaller peak vertical forces were calculated in the forelimbs and increased peak vertical forces were calculated in the hindlimbs when galloping on an incline. Measured changes in stride timing variables differ from those reported in trotting horses. We propose that horses increase their stride frequency at a given speed during incline galloping to provide power for moving the centre of mass up the slope.

Key words: horse, biomechanics, incline, power, high speed locomotion, duty factor, stride frequency

This is what happens on inclines..may be a guide

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:29 PM Reply #44 »
Well we tried

Yes, and I'm grateful for that.   :thumbsup:

But as my question stated, I was looking for some data.  We all have impressions.  (Mine would be that it's a combination of both.)

I was thinking about what I do when I run fast.  But I don't run fast any more, and forget what I did when I used to run fast.  :lol:

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2009-Sep-28, 12:51 PM Reply #45 »
Put some KFC in front of OL, and I reckon he would lengthen stride .... lol

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 03:29 PM Reply #46 »
Do horses galloping clockwise use this sequence?

Left Hind leg,  Right Hind leg,  Left Fore leg, Right Fore leg?


[attachimg=#]

[attachment deleted by admin]
« Last Edit: 2009-Sep-28, 03:32 PM by dubbledee »

Offline Big Wheel

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« 2009-Sep-28, 03:33 PM Reply #47 »
Do horses galloping clockwise use this sequence?

Left Hind leg,  Right Hind leg,  Left Fore leg, Right Fore leg?


[attachimg=#]
BUT that horse is only cantering, i was waiting for him to start
galloping   :lol:   :lol:

Offline dubbledee

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« 2009-Sep-28, 03:35 PM Reply #48 »
What's the difference between a canter a slow gallop?

PS This is not a trick question.

Offline monologue

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« 2009-Sep-28, 03:45 PM Reply #49 »
%3Cdiclass=%22msgbox%22%3ENotaalidimageile-halahorse..bmp%3C/di%3E%3Cbr%3E%3Cbr%3E


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