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Offline Tracksuitdave

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« 2017-Jan-15, 11:36 AM Reply #325 »
So if you ran your own betting pool and could purchase potentially winning tickets you would obviously go out of your way to give details of the original bettors in all publicity material. After all the fact that this ticket has enabled you to win all that rollover cash is something that requires everything to be above board. So despite many, many requests Colossusbets are no nearer to giving any clues at how the unlucky punter placed his bet. Usually third party agents of Colossusbets would be entitled to a share of the winning ticket, so in this case what price it's origin is close to home  :p :p :p

By an amazing coincidence this all happened around the time that Colossusbet's annual account filings showed that £10m of shareholders cash is long gone and they are now solely reliant on a £12m loan from the Royal Bank of Zeljko :clap2:

The thing about all this is if there was one person in the world you would want to ultimately control a betting pool in order to ensure that punters get what they richly deserve it's surely the conqueror of the Tassy Tote :stop:

« Last Edit: 2017-Jan-15, 11:38 AM by Tracksuitdave »

Offline Tracksuitdave

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« 2017-Mar-10, 01:40 PM Reply #326 »
Update on the Zeljko enterprise Colossusbets has appeared on @denis_mikan twitter handle. A link has been published which seems to link Zeljko to the tenniis courtsiding syndicate boss Steve High. Documents have appeared which show that Ragonajec's firm was doing a deal with a whistleblower who Betfair were threatening to sue :sad: Why would our hero want to silence the whistleblower and protect Betfair? :bulb:

Have a look for yourselves anyway https://justpaste.it/141t1

Colossusbets has a £10M shareholder deficit and is completely reliant on a £14M loan from it's major Tasmanian shareholder to be able to continue trading. :clap2:


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Mar-22, 04:31 PM Reply #328 »
This cause is right up Xenophon's alley.

Is this the time to impose a point of litigation levy?

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/law-order/elisabeth-steicke-branded-serial-litigant-by-judge-over-dispute-with-lawyers-connelly-and-co/news-story/7102d411ccf419af759a8f767121d286

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/law-order/adelaide-woman-involved-in-40-million-dispute-with-her-exhusband-one-worlds-biggest-gamblers-has-fired-her-law-firm/news-story/15fbec6c9b846b5918a19b6a8fc24ae2

After my punting efforts on today's Sandown meeting, I will never again be able to afford the digital subscription that those two links demand of me before I can view any Advertiser articles. This is a luxury for the rich  :sad:

But I gather this is one of those once in a blue moon occurrence where someone is very zealous in their legal pursuit of another - usually an ex-partner/spouse who has been an infidel - in the true sense of the word?

Offline ballybeg

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« 2017-Mar-22, 05:02 PM Reply #329 »
PP7

Don't click the link - simply google - adelaide now steicke - and you will see the articles without any problems.

Online jfc

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« 2017-Apr-05, 09:13 AM Reply #330 »
Some charming proclamations from our philanthropist.

Nice to see that his recent knighthood hasn't affected him.

Everyone is happy.


https://twitter.com/zeljkoranogajec/status/848248090259804165

https://twitter.com/zeljkoranogajec/status/848638037450006529


Offline HarmersHaven

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« 2017-Apr-05, 11:12 AM Reply #331 »
Do you really think it's actually ZR ???

Online jfc

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« 2017-Apr-05, 11:26 AM Reply #332 »
Do you really think it's actually ZR ???
Indubitably.

Or, in his words:


Once more you clearly demonstrate your inability to gauge your opponents.

Offline HarmersHaven

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« 2017-Apr-05, 12:22 PM Reply #333 »
Well, that settles that then - thank you linesmen, thank you ball-boys.

Your eleven-word closing line has so many inaccuracies, it's Mair-like.

"Once more" suggests a pattern of behaviour/multiple occurrences, "you clearly demonstrate your inability" suggests that you actually think your screen-shot disproves anything and "your opponents" suggests that he is indeed that - he may be yours but that does not make him mine.

I asked a simple question which, given the online environment whereby trolls/aliases/fakes/pseudo-entities are more and more the norm than the outlier, came from a genuine place and indeed was a valid line of thought.

You just couldn't help yourself, you sad old man. 

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Apr-08, 12:08 AM Reply #334 »
Was thinking of him this week.

Been working nights out at North Ryde as I often do this week - big network changes on after hours - even slept in the car one night  :shy:

Duck over to North Ryde RSL to have a break sometimes. Sit down with a coffee, watch some races and have a Keno ticket.

The 9 spot jackpot hadn't been won for a while and early in the week it was at $390k which is very high. So naturally I was taking 9 spot tickets.

Went to check my previous day's ticket on Wednesday night (I think) and noticed it had been won, and it had been won at North Ryde RSL!!!!

I think my hands were shaking a little as I checked my ticket.

Alas, God did not take up my offer to be a missionary if He could deliver on His part of the deal   :lol:

But what surprised me was that the jackpot went from high $300k's up to the winning jackpot of $606k very quickly.

I remember the syndicate having a crack at a big 10 spot jackpot in the past pushing it up rapidly and eventually winning some absurd amount, and from my recall they were operating out of North Ryde RSL.

Was wondering given the similarities in the modus operandi if it was them. Might have been sitting right next to the great man and didn't even know it  :what:

Online jfc

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« 2017-Apr-10, 07:58 AM Reply #335 »
While it's hard to imagine any superior knee slapping hilarity than the last pair of posts, Zeljko is not known as someone prepared to be bested.

And inside protracted revelations yesterday, he's produced this gem of hilarity and mirth, to top the lot:


And I'm amazed that this has not been demolished.

Firstly Zeljko is on record as turning publicity on and off whenever it suits his aims.

He's chosen to make himself a public figure and has no right to object to truer accounts of his manicured image.

Then, it's amazing that the elected morons controlling this caper still haven't realised that there are two distinct predominant forms of legal gambling.

Player versus Bank

Player versus Player

When Zeljko finds a Casino stupid enough to offer him special deals on Blackjack, or whatever, then no other Players have any right to object, because it doesn't affect them. So Player versus Bank is fine.

But in Player versus Player scenarios anyone getting Kickbacks or other special treatment can exterminate even more skillful Players.

And not only are Players exterminated but so are the Totes and other outfits stupid enough to offer Kickbacks.

We've seen this with Tote Tasmania and others.

And we've seen this with Betfair where casualties such Rodent and Harmers Haven now look to lash out at others who have not (yet) met the same fate.






Offline HarmersHaven

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« 2017-Apr-10, 10:08 AM Reply #336 »
Stick to the facts you sad, old man.

Offline mortdale

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« 2017-Apr-10, 10:47 AM Reply #337 »
If you want to read what a court case back in 2012 heard, then click on the link below.

The content is far too long to submit on the forum.

It makes for interesting reading.

https://aussiecriminals.com.au/tag/zeljko-ranogajec/


Offline Bubbasmith

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« 2017-May-10, 05:52 PM Reply #338 »
Jfc, if this book is not snapped by yourself I will be disappointed

Losing Streak, by James Boyce..How Tasmania was gamed by the gambling industry.

Online jfc

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« 2017-May-11, 05:38 AM Reply #339 »
Looks like Boyce is merely one more hand puppet in Walsh's bizarre crusade to wreck pokies and thus force all the mugs into Keno where Zeljko can clean them all out.



http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-08/james-boyce-losing-streak-leads-to-bribery-allegations-review/8505818

Online jfc

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« 2017-Sep-09, 11:29 AM Reply #340 »
Evidently the Steicke vs Steicke saga is exceeding biblical proportions.

Surely David isn't competing in the Vatican Millions!

The massive legal expenses for this apparent exercise in futility, are reminscent of what we taxpayers paid racecourse identity and liquidator Max Donelly to chase Skase.



http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/law-order/lawyer-owed-money-by-millionaire-gamblers-exwife-elisabeth-steicke-wants-her-stake-in-16-million-north-adelaide-villa/news-story/22c21701903f6142ea3a9284b62b2a93

Offline Entropy

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« 2017-Sep-13, 10:59 PM Reply #341 »
Alas poor David!  he's actually not a bad bloke though I can see her viewpoint.

As for his Tasmanian name sake, his new found altruism makes more sense when correlated with Federals monopoly and the related desires of a gaming license and who knows perhaps one day Z will have his return on investment.
 

Online jfc

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Online jfc

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« 2018-Feb-16, 07:15 PM Reply #343 »
Oh dear.

Can't get Zeljko's name right yet.

Max clearly inhabits a different universe to mine in the 90's.

Anyway, another tale of audacity

Look to your laurels Fletcher!

https://www.theage.com.au/sport/racing/max-presnell-mystery-man-zjelko-back-on-the-radar-20180216-h0w71v.html

Online jfc

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« 2018-Feb-18, 02:33 PM Reply #344 »
If anyone has Archie's original article, please link/post it here.

I interpret this as -

Some official has allowed Zeljko data that other punters can't get. Similar to Stewards only tapes that Benter and Woods greased palms to get.

Besides parade ring data, fast pictures for in running bets would obviously be included.

Wonder who owns and operates this racecourse situated gear?

My bet is that these expert vets, trainers and jockeys don't jet over to the Isle of Man to do their stuff. So I wonder how much local tax is paid on these activities.

A significant amount of the betting would be through Asian Totes who pay zero to the local industry.

Competing punters would obviously find it tough, and consequently turnover from them would drop significantly.

Yes, Max, kickbacks to Zeljko should be disclosed. Along with a credible explanation how they cause any net benefits to the industry.



Online jfc

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« 2018-May-17, 09:29 AM Reply #345 »
Revealed: ‘world’s biggest gambler’ is partner to new racecourse betting firm Britbet
Zeljko Ranogajec’s involvement raises questions over rival to The Tote

Mark Souster, Racing Writer
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times

Ranogajec is known as the “Loch Ness Monster” as he is rarely sighted
Ranogajec is known as the “Loch Ness Monster” as he is rarely sighted
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An Australian businessman who has been described as the world’s biggest gambler is the controlling figure behind a company that will partner the new betting venture designed to support British racing, The Times can reveal.

Zeljko Ranogajec, a 56-year-old Tasmanian nicknamed the “Loch Ness Monster” because he is so rarely spotted, is one of two main shareholders in Colossus Bets, an online gambling company that is due to launch a new pool betting venture this summer in partnership with 55 UK racecourses.

The new service, called Britbet, is being set up as a rival to the Tote, which was privatised in 2011, and will have a visible presence at the vast majority of Britain’s 60 race tracks from July. It has been presented to gamblers and racing fans as a venture “by racing, for racing”, so that profits will be poured back into the sport.

An investigation by The Times into Ranogajec and Colossus Bets raises questions over whether Britbet chose the best partners to achieve that ambition of securing the deal which generates most revenue for the sport. Ranogajec is thought to have become a billionaire through his gambling prowess around the world using algorithms, sophisticated computer programmes and analytics. Much of his income is derived from the large rebates, often as high as 20 per cent on his bets, that he can command for playing into the betting pools.

“Pool betting” describes the type of betting markets in which all stakes are paid into a prize pot. The bookmaker then takes a percentage of that pot — meaning the bookmaker is guaranteed to make money — and the remainder is divided between all of the punters who placed winning bets.


Pool betting operators commonly offer rebates — where a percentage of a stake is repaid even for a losing bet — to large-scale punters prepared to bet huge sums of money, because they help to keep prize pots sufficiently valuable to be attractive to all gamblers.

When living in Australia, Ranogajec had twice before been able to negotiate legally high rebates with a betting operator in the Polynesian Islands and the Tote in his native Tasmania. The Tote there had to be sold off after it struggled to make a profit.

The Tote in Britain, the previously state-owned bookmaker that was sold to Betfred in 2011, has held exclusive rights to offer pool betting in the UK but that ends this summer, which is why most of the racecourses have established Britbet and plan to offer its service at on-course betting concessions from July.

Britbet announced last year that it had agreed a partnership with Colossus Bets, a London-based company founded in 2012, which would give them a platform to offer their pool betting products online. The Times can reveal today that in doing so, Britbet signed up to a partnership with Ranogajec.

During a 30-year gambling career, Ranogajec has, perfectly legitimately, made hundreds of millions of pounds in profits from horse racing by negotiating rebates of 10 per cent or more with the operators of pool betting services in other countries.

Once he has agreed the rebate, Ranogajec, who employs an army of analysts to identify the best bets, only needs to break even on his wagers and the rebate becomes his profit. If, as has been claimed, Ranogajec bets more than £500 million each year’ following this model would yield him a £50 million annual profit. While large-scale gamblers may be successful in pool betting, it can come at a price to the pool operator.

Ranogajec’s involvement in Colossus Bets — and its partnership with Britbet — will raise questions about the level of rebates the new service will offer, and whether those rebates will allow Britbet to put back into racing as much as it hoped. After an investigation by The Times into Colossus Bets, we can reveal that:

● Ranogajec also uses the name John Wilson. Wilson is his wife Shelley’s surname.

● Colossus Bets has not made a profit in six years, and accrued losses of £17 million over that period. It is only kept afloat by a short-term loan from Ranogajec and another shareholder.

● Ranogajec has been involved in two Tote pool operations in Australia, one of which in Tasmania had to be sold off by its government to stave off collapse.

● He has been the subject of a lengthy investigation in the Australian Tax Office (ATO), with whom he reached an undisclosed settlement in 2012.

● His address in London is a £14.8 million apartment at one of the capital’s most exclusive addresses in Knightsbridge.

● John Wilson is listed in Colossus Bets accounts as a person who has significant control over the business.

● His shareholding is held by an offshore trust in the Isle of Man.

Britbet is due to be rolled out on July 13, and racing fans will want to know whether it will offer high-value punters such as Ranogajec rebates for betting large sums. There has been speculation within the gambling industry that it may even offer rebates of more than 20 per cent.

Colossus Bets has two main shareholders, Ranogajec and Bernard Marantelli, who is listed as the chief executive. Between them they own more than 80 per cent of the company. Ranogajec, using the name Wilson, and Marantelli are listed as the company’s beneficial owners.

Colossus Bets’ most recent accounts, filed in December 2017, reveal that as well as making huge losses, it has a deficit in working capital of £15.2 million and is supported only by short-term loans of £18.7 million, which according to the accounts were due to be repaid by the end of March to its beneficial owners.

These loans had been long term but were reclassified last year, when the company borrowed another £5.2 million.

A decade ago, Ranogajec was the subject of a long inquiry in Australia, where the activities of a collection of high-level gamblers known as the Punters Club, which included Ranogajec, were investigated. They argued that gambling profits in Australia are not liable to taxation.

The ATO said that the club was not merely a group of friends but a highly organised business, betting vast sums which used sophisticated encryption technology to ensure privacy. As such it should be taxed.

When contacted by The Times, the ATO said: “We do not discuss individual cases.”

Once in Britain, Ranogajec and his wife Shelley — whom he met when she was working as a croupier in a casino — moved into One Hyde Park.

Britbet says that when it launches it will offer a range of “exotic and innovative bets” such as “cash out” and guaranteed six and seven-figure prize pools. It has also intimated that it will pay rebates and incentives.

Colossus Bets provides the backroom operation for Britbet through a company called Newfield in the tax haven of the Isle of Man. In its advertising it states that it is a company which specialises in “horse racing and sporting events”. Two of its directors are also directors of Colossus Bets and a trail leads back to Australia and to John Wilson.

Newfield also owns Newfield Australia, which is the holding company for a company called Data Processors. That company lists John Wilson as a director and sole shareholder, and gives his address in Britain.

Dick McIlwain, the former chief executive of Tatts Group, which runs pool betting services in Australia, said he was not surprised that Ranogajec had turned up in Britain. McIllwain rescued the Tasmanian Tote ten years ago after it struggled to recover from paying Ranogajec huge sums in rebates.

“He is so clever he will find some other jurisdiction he can come in through to get favourable rebates,” McIlwain said. “British racing needs to be aware he is not a charity.”

Colossus Bets did not respond when contacted by The Times for comment yesterday.

Full statement from Britbet
‘Colossus Bets provide innovative products, features and have a proven track-record in working with well-known brands.

“We undertook extensive due diligence on Colossus Bets, an award-winning company licensed by the UK Gambling Commission which provides betting products to a long list of licensed betting operators in the UK and overseas. We are obviously aware that Colossus benefits from Mr Ranogajec’s gambling industry experience and financial resources. We are also fully aware that his legal name is John Wilson.

“Incurring significant costs in seeking to establish a network business is quite normal and we are pleased to be partnering with an operator with the financial resources to pursue the ‘by racing, for racing’ Britbet vision of reinvigorating the pool betting landscape and securing revenues for the spo

Online jfc

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« 2018-May-17, 09:39 AM Reply #346 »
Zeljko Ranogajec revealed that he used the name John Wilson at a hearing in December 2008 at the federal magistrates’ court in Sydney. He was suing a former associate for A$2.5 million (about £1.4 million). When asked to state his name he replied: “My name is John Wilson and I am an investor.”

His answer then provided the detail that has led to The Times revealing his double identity — and his move into British racing.

He has a track record in Australia of legitimately making vast profits out of betting pool operations after boosting their turnover. It happened with a venture in the Polynesian Islands known as VITAB. The Sydney court heard in 2008 how Ranogajec had then focused on the United States and, with an initial outlay of A$200,000, earned A$50 million in three and a half years.

In the US, Ranojagec was being given a healthy 13 per cent rebate on all of his bets, according to court documents. He explained it to the court in simple terms: “You bet to lose so that you actually turn over more money and the win comes from the rebates. If you bet $100 and lost $5, but you get a 10 per cent rebate, you still make 5 per cent.”

Next stop was in his home state of Tasmania, where he was born in 1961, the son of Croatian immigrants. His prowess at counting cards in the casino at Hobart was renowned and led him to being promoted to the Blackjack Hall of Fame in 2011.

One man with first-hand knowledge of how Ranogajec works is Dick McIlwain, the former chief executive of the Tatts Group in Australia. In 2007 Ranogajec entered into an arrangement with the Tasmanian Tote. In just four years turnover tripled to almost A$1 billion, but the rebates, averaging 10.5 per cent, meant profits were scarce, down to just A$1.5 million in 2011. McIlwain bought the stricken government-backed Tasmanian Tote for A$103 million after it teetered on the edge of bankruptcy.

McIlwain told The Times: “If he is given a particular advantage over the recreational players, he will win more than anyone else. The pools will shrink over time as the recreational punters fall away. It is a bad outcome. It eventually strangles itself.”

Online jfc

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« 2018-May-17, 03:22 PM Reply #347 »
How comforting to learn over and over how legal Zeljko's operations are.

Meanwhile Kate McClymont aims for her 2nd Australian Racing Writer of the Year award, to bookend her 1995 Jockey Tapes one.
 

https://www.smh.com.au/national/meet-the-joker-the-australian-who-is-the-biggest-gambler-in-the-world-20180515-p4zfhi.html
« Last Edit: 2018-May-17, 05:25 PM by jfc »

Offline turfdeli

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« 2018-May-17, 05:20 PM Reply #348 »
How comforting to learn over and over how legal Zeljko's operations are.

Meanwhile Kate McClymont aims for her 2nd racing story of the year award.
 

https://www.smh.com.au/national/meet-the-joker-the-australian-who-is-the-biggest-gambler-in-the-world-20180515-p4zfhi.html

Its a really well researched and presented story - really impressive work and good to see the story finally out there in the mainstream.

Online jfc

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« 2018-May-17, 05:39 PM Reply #349 »


Interesting twitterbating.


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