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Captain Smith - Sports Talk - Racehorse TALK

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Online sobig

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« 2018-Mar-29, 10:32 PM Reply #125 »
Lehmann is standing down (resigning) as coach after the 4th test in Jo'burg,

Offline fours

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« 2018-Mar-29, 11:23 PM Reply #126 »
Penalties.....

The penalty should be what we think is appropriate to the position and based on OUR values.

Using soft penalties by typically corrupt countries country's as a guide is NO GUIDE.

After all some countries cut hands off for theft versus  less than a slap on the wrist for others on the same incident. Same goes for alcohol, nudity, sex before marriage sodomy etc etc

Our standards are higher - the breach is greater our non acceptance is greater.

Fours

Offline ianb

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« 2018-Mar-30, 10:37 AM Reply #127 »
12 months ban Smith and Warner .... 9 months Bancroft

Reports Smith & Warner already have the lawyers in tow.  emthdown

 :censored:  'em .... if they appeal CA should just never pick them again.

And then sue them for the damage they have done to  both  the finances  and the credibility of Australian Cricket.


Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2018-Mar-30, 10:55 AM Reply #128 »
.


Online Gintara

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« 2018-Mar-30, 11:53 AM Reply #129 »
Taken from FB

Mark Latham's Outsiders
4 hrs ·

STANDARD MEDIA PATTERN:

1. massively exaggerate the importance of the story
2. drive a young man and his family to the point of despair
3. lead the pious hand-wringing, hoping he's okay and "resurrected" (so they can do it to him again).

On Twitter, the Channel 9 journalist Chris Uhlmann has compared Steve Smith's situation to the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Christ - yet another media over-reach in the ball-tampering story, this time trivialising the meaning of Easter.

Yes, the Australian players cheated, in a manner not uncommon in international cricket. They did the wrong thing and deserved a suspension from the game. But now we can see the real-life consequences of the media's hyperbole in beating up this story (scuffing up a cricket ball).

Just about every Australian media figure is now talking of how much they care about Steve Smith and hoping he makes a successful comeback.

How do these people sleep at night? They pile the pressure on the young man, break him (as we saw at last night's press conference) and then they want to be the ones to help him pick up the pieces (for more ratings glory). It's sickening to watch this pattern unfold, time after time.

Offline Wenona

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« 2018-Mar-30, 01:16 PM Reply #130 »

It always looked like sandpaper to me and I do wonder what grade it was.

How do cricketers get their hands on sandpaper during the lunch break?


Not so sure about now, but sandpaper was standard in your kit.

Part of bat maintenance but also used to remove the red marks on the edge of the bat caused by edges. The big cherry marks in the middle were usually left alone.  :)


Online PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Mar-30, 01:31 PM Reply #131 »
Taken from FB

Mark Latham's Outsiders
4 hrs ·

STANDARD MEDIA PATTERN:

1. massively exaggerate the importance of the story
2. drive a young man and his family to the point of despair
3. lead the pious hand-wringing, hoping he's okay and "resurrected" (so they can do it to him again).

On Twitter, the Channel 9 journalist Chris Uhlmann has compared Steve Smith's situation to the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Christ - yet another media over-reach in the ball-tampering story, this time trivialising the meaning of Easter.

Yes, the Australian players cheated, in a manner not uncommon in international cricket. They did the wrong thing and deserved a suspension from the game. But now we can see the real-life consequences of the media's hyperbole in beating up this story (scuffing up a cricket ball).

Just about every Australian media figure is now talking of how much they care about Steve Smith and hoping he makes a successful comeback.

How do these people sleep at night? They pile the pressure on the young man, break him (as we saw at last night's press conference) and then they want to be the ones to help him pick up the pieces (for more ratings glory). It's sickening to watch this pattern unfold, time after time.

The more and more I read Mark Latham the more and more I want him to have some say in the direction of our nation. I've always been a swinging voter and made my own decisions but next election I will be following Latham's directions.

The media (both mainstream and social) is a nascent evil in our society and the above is a great example why.

The penalties handed out compare to Atherton ($3,000 fine) and du Plessis in Hobart using a mint on the ball (3 demerit points).

The initial penalties handed out by the international body have been multiplied by 50 or so.

Sutherland would have been thinking "what penalty can I dish out so that the media do not attack me".

The recent Barnaby Joyce incident was another example. The way the Telegraph singled him out while totally ignoring all the other transgression by politicians of the same nature - both i)  :censored: ing the office help and ii) nepotism in giving "mates" high paid jobs - was very similar to this.

All points 1., 2. and 3. in Latham's piece applied to Joyce.

Why they only applied the torch to Joyce and ignored every single other politician (both parties) implies a conspiracy of the highest order. You can only think that Murdoch or one of his sons spoke directly to Turnbull and Shorten to assure them it would be a single, targetted attack.

Thanks for posting that Gin. Can I ask where you got that from? I used to read Latham but Rebel Media disappointingly put up a pay wall.


Online Gintara

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« 2018-Mar-30, 02:42 PM Reply #132 »
PP - there is a website http:// www.marklathamsoutsiders.com or just follow him on Facebook, just search 'Mark Latham's Outsiders' and it will come straight up, currently it's the 2nd story down the page.

Offline Jeunes

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« 2018-Mar-30, 02:58 PM Reply #133 »
Unfortunately with Latham, it is hard to listen to his views without remembering that infamous handshake with Howard. Lost himself a few votes with the grip of steel.

Also heard taxi drivers banned him for a while too. Latham got himself ostracised the same way Smith, Joyce etc but through his comments.

Like many ex politicians he does come up with a few good points now and then.


Online PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Mar-30, 03:20 PM Reply #134 »
Unfortunately with Latham, it is hard to listen to his views without remembering that infamous handshake with Howard. Lost himself a few votes with the grip of steel.

Also heard taxi drivers banned him for a while too. Latham got himself ostracised the same way Smith, Joyce etc but through his comments.

Like many ex politicians he does come up with a few good points now and then.

Tough man. Used to play Rugby against him when he was at Hurlstone Ag.

I think he has matured from the handshake days and has the leadership qualities this country needs.

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2018-Mar-30, 03:22 PM Reply #135 »
Sadly the media won’t have a bar of it

Online PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Mar-30, 03:33 PM Reply #136 »
Sadly the media won’t have a bar of it

That is to be expected because the media (mainstream and social) is the target of a lot of his criticisms - justifiably so. In fact you could argue he is one of the few people with a public voice that is doing so.

But I think the public interest is starting to wane in the "new media" and people are being educated about the con the media is conducting.

The outrageous penalties in the Smith ball tampering case are a great example. Joyce another one. The push by the Telegraph for the NSW government to spend $3 billion on new stadiums, grossly overstating any problems with the existing ones, and grossly overstating the importance to "the economy" of football stadiums.

It is time people started to question what they hear and read on the internet. Climate Change dogma another one. The supposed normality of "transgenderism". Diversity policies. I could go on.

People have had a gutful. Latham provides a workable alternative if you don't like having dogma shoved down your throat.

Offline fours

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« 2018-Mar-30, 03:37 PM Reply #137 »
PP7,

Around 4 in the morning I said - next plane home about the cricket transgressors and out of the team for good - that is MY standard expressed while 98% of the media were in bed and blissfully unaware of the situation.

I was correct about the 'next plane hoe part' but expect the appeal process to put penalties much closer to the middle ground... as usual.

Fours

Offline Authorized

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« 2018-Mar-30, 07:23 PM Reply #138 »

Disgrace under pressu lessons from the Australians' bad decisions


The Australian cricket captain Steve Smith and vice-captain David Warner, along with Cameron Bancroft, made a scarcely believable, terrible decision to tamper with the ball during the third Test against South Africa in Cape Town last week. They have rightly been stripped of their leadership roles and will serve lengthy bans from the game. They no doubt reflect on that appalling decision and wonder how on earth they could have made it.

I had the privilege of working with the Australian cricket team for five years up until July last year as their doctor. For nine to 10 months of each year I lived, ate, worked, and laughed with a great bunch of young men who were committed to ''being number one in the word in all three formats'' – Cricket Australia’s mantra.

I first met Smith in England in 2012 when he was part-time spin-bowler and tail-end batsman on the fringes of both the one-day and Test teams. I watched him develop over the ensuing five years into the best batsman in the world – a remarkable transformation.

In 2015, I had my doubts whether he was ready for the demands of captaincy, but I watched on as he impressively rose to the challenge of leadership, and became an even better batsman.

It was with some trepidation that I first met David Warner in India in 2013. His reputation as ''The Bull'' (an aggressive big hitter who was difficult to deal with) preceded him. And that was (and still is) an image he portrays. The reality was very different. Warner was always interested in other people, and keen to learn about life. Far from being difficult to deal with, he totally reformed his diet and fitness (I suspect it was partly to improve his cricket, mostly to impress Candice!), and set about proving himself as a Test batsman with the technique and concentration to complement the power and skill he’d shown in the Twenty20 format. And as always, he provided the sharp-edge thought necessary to succeed in the harsh and competitive environment of Test cricket.

So if, as I suggest, Smith and Warner are basically good people, how did they come to make what is arguably the worst decision in the history of Australian sport? We need to understand those reasons in order to prevent a similar occurrence in the future.

After 30 years of being around elite sportspeople and teams both here and overseas, I have had first-hand experience of the sort of pressure that teams and individuals operate under. I have observed at close quarters the likes of Cathy Freeman and our athletic team at Olympics, Commonwealth Games and World Championships, I have watched AFL players prepare themselves for grand finals and other big games, I have been with the Socceroos at the World Cup and Liverpool at English Premier League games in the spine-tingling atmosphere at Anfield – all under immense scrutiny and pressure to win. Some coped better with that pressure than others.

Until working with the cricket team I did not appreciate the physical and mental brutality of a five-day Test match. The pressure to perform and to win is immense. The Australian public believes that the Test cricket team is “our team”. We all have an opinion on who should be in the team, and have a lot of passion invested in their fortunes. We’re accustomed to winning and are very intolerant of losses such as those in the home series against South Africa at the end of 2016, which was accompanied by front-page newspaper headlines demanding change. As a result, half the team was sacked.

The players and staff feel that pressure. They are on tour for most of the year while at the same time trying to have some sort of normal existence with partners and family. If you play all three forms of the game – interestingly Smith and Warner are two of the few who do – you rarely get to sleep in your own bed at home.

As well as lacking a regular home life, modern Test players inhabit an unusual social environment. Often unable to leave hotels when on tour for security reasons, teams and players can become highly introspective. The rapid development from junior cricketer to professional can mean that players miss life experiences most of us take for granted. And with little preparation, they are thrust into an environment where every on and off-field move is recorded, and all of their professional and personal failures are magnified in front of the world.

Sport is littered with stories of otherwise sensible people losing their perspective and becoming obsessed with winning. Essendon and Melbourne Storm are two Australian examples that spring to mind, but the trend exists across all sports and around the world.

This Australian tour of South Africa has been extremely stressful with both sides behaving poorly and a generally unpleasant atmosphere. Warner has had to deal with verbal attacks on his family, while Smith has ultimate carried responsibility for the team performance. Both would have been dealing with the additional burden of poor form.

It is worth careful examination of the role that fatigue, pressure, and stress played in Smith and Warner’s decision-making. Greg Chappell has stated that he was in no fit state to be captain when he made the ill-fated decision to ask his younger brother Trevor to bowl the infamous underarm delivery against New Zealand in 1981. Every Australian captain since then has had moments where the demands of their role reduced the quality of their judgment. Given their actions, one has to conclude that Smith was in a similar position during this last Test match.

We always joke that the captaincy of the Australian cricket team is at least the second-most important job in the country, but for many it’s number one. The captains have little formal leadership training, and are just expected to do the job. Easier said than done. At the same time they have to maintain their own high levels of performance, which demands a huge commitment of physical and mental energy.

Yes I know what you are all saying. These guys get paid millions of dollars to shoulder the responsibility. But no amount of payment or sponsorship will endow players with superhuman physical and mental powers. They remain as human as the rest of us.

Smith, in particular, has gone from being probably the most popular sportsperson in the country (Australian of the Year, according to one newspaper), to being a figure of ridicule and contempt. I would argue that neither extreme is appropriate. Smith is a decent man putting his all into a difficult job. In a desperate attempt to turn around a Test match that was slipping away, he suffered a serious lapse in judgment with disastrous consequences for himself and the game of cricket in this country.

We must try to learn from this, and ensure that future captains are given more support and not put in situations where their judgment can be so clouded. The players should be playing less cricket, and breaks away from the game need to be included in the schedules of all senior players. Perhaps it is time to consider complete separation of the Test and ODI/T20 teams.

The culture of win-at-all costs needs to change. As part of that, the Australian public need to accept that defeat does not mean the players are not giving it their all. The public and media are all too happy to pile on the pressure and expectation, and then call for heads to roll when its effects take their toll.

I worry about these young men and how they will handle the enforced break. Hopefully they will take the opportunity to broaden their life experiences and equip themselves for the pressures they will be under if they return to the Australian Test team. And I hope they do return. They are not bad people. They just made a very bad decision in a very stressful situation.

For now, they are having the book thrown at them, and rightly so. But when the catharsis is done, it’s time to take a look at the pressure we put these people under and understand how to create a better environment in the future.

Peter Brukner was Team Doctor of the Australian cricket team from 2012-17.


https://www.theage.com.au/sport/cricket/doctor-peter-brukner-ball-tampering-warner-bancroft-20180329-p4z704.html


Online firezuki

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« 2018-Mar-30, 08:15 PM Reply #139 »
I like Latham and I'm a cabbie.

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk


Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Mar-30, 10:22 PM Reply #140 »
Are you people referring to the complete goose who once was the leader of the Federal Australian Labour Party ?  History quite rightly judges him as the greatest moron  to be in charge of this Party. Why would anyone with half a brain be interested in anything he had to say about anything ?

Offline fours

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« 2018-Mar-31, 05:45 AM Reply #141 »
Gunbower,

For a start he wanted to make politicians superannuation, and access to it,  much more like that of all other Australians.....

Fours

Online firezuki

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« 2018-Mar-31, 05:57 AM Reply #142 »
Are you people referring to the complete goose who once was the leader of the Federal Australian Labour Party ?  History quite rightly judges him as the greatest moron  to be in charge of this Party. Why would anyone with half a brain be interested in anything he had to say about anything ?


I think you're getting him mixed up with Gough.  Now there's a complete dikhead.


But back on subject  ...............

Offline Jeunes

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« 2018-Mar-31, 10:21 AM Reply #143 »
After Smith and Bancroft press conferences and feeling sympathy towards them, the Warner conference opened up a few holes in the official reports or versions. What Warner did not say has now opened up a few questions on Sutherland's official version of him being the main culprit.

Online Gintara

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« 2018-Mar-31, 11:34 AM Reply #144 »
He constantly said 'I take full responsibility for my part" which says a lot without saying it.

Time will be interesting when the books come out in a few years with the different versions ......


Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Mar-31, 07:35 PM Reply #145 »
I think you're getting him mixed up with Gough.  Now there's a complete dikhead.

I think your mirror is playing up .

Offline winner

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« 2018-Apr-01, 12:37 PM Reply #146 »
Taken from FB

Mark Latham's Outsiders
4 hrs ·

STANDARD MEDIA PATTERN:

1. massively exaggerate the importance of the story
2. drive a young man and his family to the point of despair
3. lead the pious hand-wringing, hoping he's okay and "resurrected" (so they can do it to him again).

On Twitter, the Channel 9 journalist Chris Uhlmann has compared Steve Smith's situation to the Crucifixion and Resurrection of Christ - yet another media over-reach in the ball-tampering story, this time trivialising the meaning of Easter.

Yes, the Australian players cheated, in a manner not uncommon in international cricket. They did the wrong thing and deserved a suspension from the game. But now we can see the real-life consequences of the media's hyperbole in beating up this story (scuffing up a cricket ball).

Just about every Australian media figure is now talking of how much they care about Steve Smith and hoping he makes a successful comeback.

How do these people sleep at night? They pile the pressure on the young man, break him (as we saw at last night's press conference) and then they want to be the ones to help him pick up the pieces (for more ratings glory). It's sickening to watch this pattern unfold, time after time.

Latham is an absolute tool but he's right in this situation. The media's response has been disgusting.

Offline winner

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« 2018-Apr-01, 12:42 PM Reply #147 »
Are you people referring to the complete goose who once was the leader of the Federal Australian Labour Party ?  History quite rightly judges him as the greatest moron  to be in charge of this Party. Why would anyone with half a brain be interested in anything he had to say about anything ?

You answered your own question. (Less than half a brain)

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Apr-01, 05:57 PM Reply #148 »
Surely would have been better known as "Loser "

Offline Bubbasmith

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« 2018-May-15, 08:29 PM Reply #149 »
Cameron Smith has retired from representative football to spend more time with his family and Melbourne Storm. Good on him, the State of Origin series have not only cost him quality time with his family but have cost Storm wins over the years playing with a depleted team.


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