Cricket - Sports Talk - Racehorse TALK harm-plan

Racehorse TALK



Cricket - Sports Talk - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: Cricket  (Read 332506 times)

0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7797
« 2018-Mar-06, 05:48 PM Reply #10175 »
FORGET that someone may have said something to David Warner.
Footage of the Australian vice-captain having to be physically restrained, more than once, in a stairwell, walking off the field after tea in Durban paints an ugly picture.
Before the Ashes started this summer, word filtered out that the “Reverend” was gone and the “Bull” was back.
Warner had calmed down from the firebrand who earned a bad reputation not because he sledged — everyone does — but more because he didn’t know when to stop.
But after his marriage, two daughters, and becoming a leader not just of the national team but also in the Indian Premier League where Warner earns millions, he had softened and matured.
He was by no means mute, but Warner sailed much further from the “line”.
Just why the Reverend has taken a back seat to the resurgent Bull is unclear, but if any evidence was needed that Warner’s antagonistic ways had returned, watch the video from Durban.
The South Africans have always got on Warner’s goat — they don’t like him, and he does not like them.
Warner was at it from the moment the first Test started, being vocal without going overboard.
But as the match progressed, his intensity levels went through the roof.
His send-off for A.B. de Villiers when he was run out on Sunday seemed harsher than it needed to be, given Australia was so far ahead in the game.
But the video that emerged of his antics in the stairwell, where wicketkeeper Tim Paine urged him to shut up, Usman Khawaja tried to steer him to the rooms and then Steve Smith and rival captain Faf du Plessis, minus his shirt, had to get involved, does not look good.
Proteas wicketkeeper Quentin de Kock, the target of Warner’s vitriol, seems an unlikely enemy.
Commentator Michael Holding said he thought De Kock was a “koala”, cuddly with big doughy eyes.
Sledging is not usually a part of De Kock’s game.
Warner is never one to shy away from a fight, and backs it up when it comes time to explain himself, too.
He’ll admit if he went too far. He won’t hide from questions, but this one could take some explaining.
russell.gould@news.com.au

Offline gunbower

  • Group3
  • User 2463
  • Posts: 794
« 2018-Mar-06, 06:04 PM Reply #10176 »
Sounds like Warner may have taken umbrage at some comments which may have concerned his wife's one time penchant for a famous footballer or the use of outdoor public utilities : or perhaps both.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-06, 06:42 PM Reply #10177 »
That seems to be it, Gun but Warner was the one who got down and dirty first.
That someone retaliated to his crap is not a surprise

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7797
« 2018-Mar-06, 07:40 PM Reply #10178 »
Sounds like Warner may have taken umbrage at some comments which may have concerned his wife's one time penchant for a famous footballer or the use of outdoor public utilities : or perhaps both.

From wikipedia..
Candice Warner has had previous high-profile relationships with sporting stars such as Braith Anasta, Matt Henjak, Matt Poole, Brent Staker, Anderson, David Carney and Marcos Baghdatis. She was also in a brief relationship with British comedian David Walliams.She is also known for a "toilet tryst" with rugby superstar Sonny Bill Williams. In 2007, she was captured on a mobile phone camera with Williams at the Clovelly Hotel. She was seen with another Bulldogs player, Ben Roberts, at a Kings Cross nightclub three hours afterward."
Then again Warner may have been upset that De Kok might have referred to Candice's appearance in 2017 as a celebrity contestant on the Australian version of Hell's Kitchen.She came in tenth place, being the first one eliminated.

Quinton de Kok, must have known those facts and in response to Warner's comments about his family, de Kok most probably hit back with those facts.

Brent Staker is more known for being  punched in the face by Sydney Swans full-forward Barry Hall Video footage from the incident indicated that contact was made with a punch to the jaw. Staker took no further part in the game, remaining off the field for the duration of the game. Hall's punch was graded by the Match Review Panel as intentional, severe impact and high contact, and he was referred to the tribunal and suspended for seven games, one of the most severe punishments in the modern era by the AFL Tribunal.Video footage of the incident was shown on television as far abroad as Denmark and the United States on the ESPN network.

« Last Edit: 2018-Mar-07, 08:04 AM by Bubbasmith »

Online firezuki

  • VIP Club
  • Group 1
  • User 259
  • Posts: 16786
« 2018-Mar-06, 07:48 PM Reply #10179 »
Very friendly girl. 


I'm guessing all her friends are all taller than Warner. 

Offline gunbower

  • Group3
  • User 2463
  • Posts: 794
« 2018-Mar-06, 09:54 PM Reply #10180 »
Two class acts together. Who says opposites attract .

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7797
« 2018-Mar-07, 08:03 AM Reply #10181 »
One wonders why Warner seems to run into trouble with blokes like Root ( Warner punched him in a bar ) and de Kok....does it have anything to do with their surnames ?
If that is the case, he leaves himself open about his own personal life.

Online Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 31143
« 2018-Mar-10, 09:25 AM Reply #10182 »
Not smart by South African officials.

I have no sympathy and little respect for Warner but officials should not be endorsing this.


Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-10, 10:33 AM Reply #10183 »
What did they endorse?

Online Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 31143
« 2018-Mar-10, 11:10 AM Reply #10184 »
Yeh, Perhaps they did not know who the mask was and what it was all about.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-10, 11:43 AM Reply #10185 »
Still none the wiser as to what you're talking about   :lol:

Offline sobig

  • Group 2
  • User 583
  • Posts: 3449
« 2018-Mar-10, 11:56 AM Reply #10186 »
Posed with SBW masks wily.

Online Authorized

  • Group 1
  • User 18
  • Posts: 31143
« 2018-Mar-10, 12:18 PM Reply #10187 »
WHO DREW THE @#$%ING LINE ?

Sledging is a waste of time. Trust me, I know



Could you give us a hand here please? Poor old Mr Squiggle needs a refill for his pencil nose. He has been drawing so many lines these past few weeks that today he can’t even muster a full stop.

Lines here, lines there. It was so much easier when Mr Squiggle just had to turn some kid’s scrawl into an elephant playing the bongos. Whatever.

Now that Mr Squiggle has been co-opted by sport as the official line demarcation marionette there are new lines for cricket, tennis, rugby league, the NRL Broncos. And it’s not just like a line a day. The sports keep wanting to change their boundaries almost by the hour.

Take the South African and Australian cricket teams. Quinton de Kock and David Warner and officials from both teams have been replacing so many lines so many times this past week Mr Squiggle came down with a serious case of proboscis fatigue.

Both Warner and de Kock clearly didn’t see a line, knew about a line, stayed behind a line thus had any idea that a line was to their rear and not in front of them. So comprehensively was the line ignored both players brought themselves and the game of cricket into disrepute. That is inarguable. That both players received penalties so soft that they are playing in the second Test underlines how the real authority in cricket now rests with the players and not the ICC or national cricket boards.

The vision we have seen of both teams as they left the ground for the tea break in last week’s first Test against South Africa is both embarrassing and damaging. But the actions of the players were inevitable.

Warner and de Kock were lucky to receive fines and demerit points insufficient to keep them from playing in the second fracas which has begun in Port Elizabeth. With that wonderful arrogance of the “they can’t do that to us” variety, de Kock appealed his penalty and lost. He was meant have made some despicable remarks to Warner about his wife.

Here is the problem. Once you decide that sledging is acceptable and a genuine tool of the cricketing trade then the line of what is tolerable is redrawn to suit the circumstances. Overstep it on Monday and Mr Squiggle has a new one for you Tuesday, just a few metres further on. Both Australia and South Africa maintained no line had been crossed but the vision showed it had been triple jumped.

Sledging is a limited tactic. In fact a waste of time if the opponent can ignore or respond in kind and remain unruffled. So you search for a sharper and sharper barb that will pierce the opponent’s concentration and force him from the calm and controlled mental space he had so carefully manicured for the previous umpteen overs.

In South Africa there is no line now, just a rage. An intent to provoke. In the stairwell at Durban it was de Kock who first swung, verbally at least with what The Weekend Australian cricket writer, Peter Lalor, has described as a disgusting comment.

Warner, who had been sledging everybody and anything within a 20km radius of the centre wicket, lacked the wit and presence to respond effectively so showed his sledging arsenal had been reduced to looking for physical resolution. For a man who had barely moments before called de Kock a “f...ing sook”, Warner had been completely exposed and disarmed.

This is not theory. Bowling for Prahran in Victorian District cricket when I could bowl off a long run and, better still, remember how many paces were required to measure it, I sledged past the point of insanity.

Once, bowling to an opening batsman who was unmoved by my verbal battering he was, more importantly, unmoved by anything I was able to hurl at him with the ball. As this bowler-batsman battle within a match continued to build like a fire from twigs to logs any line supposedly held in sacred trust had sizzled to ashes.

When the batsman sniggered at another harmless bouncer I had run out of tricks. So, trapped in Warner’s same moment of uselessness and embarrassment, I walked down the pitch and chested the batsman through his stumps. By any judgment it was a shameful action and brought two reports — physical contact and persistent sledging — and, of course, suspension. I had shown no respect to my opponent or to cricket itself. None, either, to my parents and the people who had spent their time to coach me. I played cricket for half a season more at a different club but never knew why. I was but a ghost, killed off in a moment where the boundaries of decency no longer registered.

Former Australian Test skipper Ian Chappell, as tough a cricketer to have played the game, was right this week. He said on radio:

“I’m hearing it (sledging) is part of the game — that’s rubbish, it’s not part of the game. He (Warner) is the one who’s going to get into trouble but what about the people who are encouraging him to do it? You go back a few years, he said he was encouraged by the captain and by the coach to do it.

“Then he decided he’d had enough of that, he didn’t want to do it, he didn’t want to be the attack dog, now for some reason or other he’s back as the attack dog.

“I’ve heard James Sutherland say it’s part of the game, he appoints the coach, it’s just ridiculous that it’s allowed to go on.

“The more you allow players to talk on the field the more likelihood there is something personal will be said.”

Everybody knows where the line is and for what it stands. Common sense, good manners and respect. To suggest that comments about family cross the line is to arbitrarily pick a fight. Much worse can be said about your teammate, a brother-in-arms, but if you are not a blood relative it is considered a fair cop. Such nonsense. It is why Warner has garnered little sympathy. His defence on Thursday that he was defending his family’s honour was childish, schoolboy logic. He said he became emotional. Just what does he think all his sledging is stirring in his opponents? Like it did de Kock.

Mr Squiggle needs a new nose or two because it is too easy to push the line this way and that so as to suit your defence. The Australians are making dills of themselves. It is uncomfortable to watch them and Warner has been made to look a fool.

Trust me, I know.

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7797
« 2018-Mar-12, 06:56 PM Reply #10188 »
After watching the current series between Australian and South Africa, I think it comes down between Smith / de Villiers and Starc / Rabada .. at the moment the South African  combination leads as to the future of the series.

Offline ratsack

  • VIP Club
  • Group 1
  • User 327
  • Posts: 10310
« 2018-Mar-12, 08:44 PM Reply #10189 »
After watching the current series between Australian and South Africa, I think it comes down between Smith / de Villiers and Starc / Rabada .. at the moment the South African  combination leads as to the future of the series.

well Starc wins Bubba
Rabada gone for two tests   

Offline Bubbasmith

  • Group 1
  • User 197
  • Posts: 7797
« 2018-Mar-13, 03:07 PM Reply #10190 »
Ratsack.not wrong, that puts the Aussies in the van.

Offline Jeunes

  • VIP Club
  • Group 2
  • User 296
  • Posts: 2399
« 2018-Mar-22, 09:07 PM Reply #10191 »
England bowled out for 58 in the First test in NZ. Boult and Southee took 6 and 4 wickets respectively and were the only bowlers used for the English innings of 21 overs.

Best part of the day for England was it could have been worse as it 9/27 at one stage.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:04 AM Reply #10192 »
Maybe next time we'll show our greats a little more respect.



Warner   wtf
Marsh wtf

We've got what we screamed for
 :sad: :sad: :sad: :tears: :tears: :tears: :tears:

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:05 AM Reply #10193 »

 :sad:

Wasn't he just wonderful again.

How many pages will the hacks from the papers fill with him tomorrow :mad:

A visionary   :lol:

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:08 AM Reply #10194 »
Warner
In my humble opinion he doesn't have the mental skills to play test cricket. If he changes his approach he may succeed


Mental skills :wavecry:

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:13 AM Reply #10195 »
Warner, played day one of the match and decided he didnt feel like fronting up the next day. His excuse was that he felt he was out of form and went to the nets instead.
Of course his team mates had to field with one man short as no subs are allowed. he knew this and thumbed his nose at them

Self centred Grub

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:32 AM Reply #10196 »
Warner covers himself in glory



David Warner might have surrendered his place on cricket’s most prestigious tour because of 56 minutes of madness for all his 192,000 Twitter followers – and the rest of the world – to see.

Warner launched a blistering attack in the early hours of Saturday morning, India time, against two of the Australian media’s longest-serving cricket writers, Robert Craddock and Malcolm Conn.
It was still not confirmed if the opener had sent the tweets, which were laden with vitriol towards Craddock, Conn and the media in general.He began his tirade by tweeting ‘‘Shock me @crashcraddock1 talking shit about ipl jealous prick. Get a real job. All you do is bag people. #getalife’’. Craddock’s fellow News Ltd journalist, Conn, responded: ’’@davidwarner31 cricket is a real job? Please. Most people pay to play. Million dollar cricketers milking the IPL are hardly the best judges.’’

Warner went on to write of Craddock: ‘‘All he did was talk shit about the greats now he sucks up there ass. Talk more crap why don’t you’’.Among several other colourful tweets, Warner wrote to Conn: ‘‘@malcolmconn keep writing paper talk trash for a living champ only thing you will ever do’’ and ‘‘@malcolmconn are you still talking you old fart, no wonder know one buys your paper’’.Among Conn’s responses was: ‘‘@davidwarner31 You lose 4-0 in India, don’t make a run, and you want to be tickled on the tummy? Win the Ashes and get back to me’’ and ‘‘It’s becoming increasingly obvious why Brad Haddin was brought back as vice captain. Your lengths behind in that race’’.

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:33 AM Reply #10197 »
News in that Warner is being sent home from tour. Got pissed and caused trouble. Is anyone surprised? His ego is out of control

Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:33 AM Reply #10198 »
The writing as on the wall a long time ago and they to.eratd it. Now look at the result :mad:

David Warner could be sent home from Champions Trophy after physical altercation with England player

David Warner was involved in a physical altercation with an England player - reported to be Joe Root - and has been stood down from the Champions Trophy match against New Zealand.
Cricket Australia did not confirm the identity of the England player but said in a statement: "Warner has been reported for breaching Rule 6: Unbecoming Behaviour after he was allegedly involved in a physical altercation with an England player in the early hours of Sunday morning following the ICC Champions Trophy match between the teams in Birmingham.


Team management have stood down Warner pending the outcome of the hearing, meaning he will miss Australia’s match against New Zealand in Birmingham tonight.

"CA will convene the Code of Behaviour as soon as possible. Details will be provided once the time and date is confirmed."


The England and Wales Cricket Board "confirmed that David Warner initiated an unprovoked physical attack on a member of the England team.

"Warner has admitted behaving inappropriately and has since apologised to the player involved who has accepted the apology.

"Following a full investigation the England team management has concluded that the England player was in no way responsible for nor retaliated to the attack.

Fairfax Media reported that the altercation took place at about 2 am on Sunday following Australia’s defeat to England at Edgbaston. The altercation included Warner flashing a ‘‘glancing blow’’ which struck Root on the chin. It reported that that alcohol was a factor and other members of the Australian team were present.

There is a possibility that Warner could be sent home.

It is the second time in three weeks that Warner has been in trouble with CA.

He was fined $5750 last month for an expletive-laden rant on Twitter.

CA officials had been claiming that Warner did not drink towards the end of the recent IPL in India as he prepared for the Champions Trophy and Ashes tour to follow.

However, it is believed several cricket people who were at the IPL were aware of Warner’s regular drinking.

He flew three of his school mates to India during the Twenty20 tournament to keep him company.

Both Warner and the Delhi Daredevils struggled and Warner has hardly managed a run since he has been in England preparing for the Champions Trophy.

He scored nine in Australia’s bad loss to England last Saturday.

Andrew Symonds was sent home from the World T20 tournament in 2009 because of an alcohol related incident.


Offline wily ole dog

  • Group 1
  • User 218
  • Posts: 25624
« 2018-Mar-28, 06:35 AM Reply #10199 »
Spot on Devil


I here ya Gin...

But my punishment is different...fck him...go home...Australia move on.with another player...if you were him...how much shame he has...Gin...it proves we as Aussies do not put up with shit that Warner has put up.to us....that he has to be respected as a Aussie pro sportsman..

Not gonna happen....not repected..Out.....

 :beer:


BACK TO ALL TOPICS
Sitemap