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Author Topic: Gavaskar Border Trophy  (Read 10367 times)

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Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-28, 02:37 PM Reply #150 »
We can take a hell of alot more than that out of the series.

Australia showed fair dinkum fight, something they have not done in a long time.

The big negative is Steve Smiths captaincy.


Online winner

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« 2017-Mar-28, 02:55 PM Reply #151 »
2 down. A couple more quick wickets would make it interesting.


Offline dean

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« 2017-Mar-28, 03:22 PM Reply #152 »
Authorized are you having delusions ; What fight ? In the Second Test we were set 188 runs to win and the best 11 cricketers in the land fell to pieces like the proverbial deck of cards for a rousing 112. In this current Test after some of the Indian Tail and lower order gave our bowlers a spanking when making 332 , our gritty lads came out and managed 137 . Super Stuff that. And now the Indians have again showed how tricky it is bat on this track ! Please ! You must be very easily impressed.

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-28, 03:30 PM Reply #153 »


Australia has been very very good.

It was a great series played in a ferocious spirit with the best side eventually coming out on top.

I am absolutely happy with the fight Australia displayed.




Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2017-Mar-28, 04:04 PM Reply #154 »
"Flat-track bully" "Worst opening bat since....."

Fact.

Only Smith of our top six scored more runs than Warner.


Offline dean

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« 2017-Mar-28, 05:03 PM Reply #155 »
You blokes are away with the fairies. Hanscomb and Renshaw scored more runs than the flat track bully. As did Wade. All were at a better average than the overrated one. Even Maxwell ended up with a better average.  However I will give credit where credit is due. He surpassed the efforts of the Magnificent Marsh brothers with his batting average of 24. To think Kwahaja was left out of all Tests because selectors felt S Marsh played better in Indian conditions. He averaged 18. Selectors should join the Marsh lads on the no longer required list.

Online wily ole dog

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« 2017-Mar-28, 07:24 PM Reply #156 »
"Flat-track bully" "Worst opening bat since....."

Fact.

Only Smith of our top six scored more runs than Warner.

Fact :chin: Oh Geoff, do your homework

Warner 193 runs from 8 digs was out performed by the following


Renshaw 232
Handscomb 198
Wade 196
Maxwell 159 from 4 digs
Smith, you got one right 499 :thumbsup:

Actually you got 2 others right, The joke Marsh brothers who batted in the top 6 at one stage averaged 18 & 12, marginally worse than Warner :wacko:

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2017-Mar-28, 07:38 PM Reply #157 »
I was talking about the last test.

It was after that that you blokes took aim.

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-29, 12:16 AM Reply #158 »

Steve Smith was disappointed and apologetic after his side lost the Border-Gavaskar Trophy, but ­India captain Virat Kohli was not in a generous mood, claiming any friendships he had with Australian players were finished forever.

India came back after losing the first Test of the series to win 2-1, Australia stumbling at the last hurdle.

The four matches have been compelling and marred by controversies. Smith was condemned for looking towards the balcony for advice on the decision review system in the second match, Kohli claiming the captain and his side were consistently cheating. He refused to offer any other evidence or back away from his claims.

Smith was then seen to mouth “f..king cheat” in a moment of frustration after Murali Vijay claimed a grounded catch as the match slipped away from Australia in Dharamsala. The Australia captain scored 499 runs, including three centuries, in the four Tests.

“I am sort of proud of my ­performances in this series,” he said. “I set myself high standards and I wanted to lead from the front with my performances. I have been very intense and in my own little bubble and at times I have let my emotions falter a little bit throughout this series and I ­apologise for that. That’s a big stride for me moving forward and something I can really learn from and continue to grow as an individual and as a leader.”

After spending the morning before the final Test started with the Dalai Lama, Smith spoke about keeping things in perspective. Kohli, who did not play in the last match because of a shoulder injury, was not in such a forgiving mood.

He said before the series that he was friends with a number of Australian players. But yesterday he said: “It has changed. I thought that was the case, but it has changed for sure. As I said, in the heat of the battle you want to be competitive, but I’ve been proven wrong. The thing I said before the first Test, that has certainly changed and you won’t hear me say that ever again.”

Both captains gave credit to the opposition, Kohli saying that to win against an Australian side that would not give up made this one of the best series he has been involved in.

“I think they had the belief of making things happen in these conditions, that’s something that I sensed in their body language and the way they played their cricket,” he said. “They believed they could win sessions and win situations and that was the most important thing, and the most challenging thing for us.

“Teams really lose their morale once they lose a Test match in India, but they kept bouncing back and they had the desire to compete throughout. That’s why they are the number two side in the world.

“You expect that from Aust­ralia. Once they get a sniff they put you under pressure, but the way we responded, I’m really proud of that as well. I would say their relentlessness and their desire to make things happen in these conditions was probably the reason why they kept giving us a great fight to the end of this Test match. So a lot of credit goes to them.”

While Smith was obviously disappointed to have come so close in the series and fall short, he said he was proud his side was able to ­battle it out right up to the last two innings of the match.

“We can take a lot out of the way we played, the plans we had, but we just needed to do it a little bit longer at times and be a bit more consistent,” he said. “We’ve certainly had our opportunities to win the games of cricket against a quality opposition like India. They will get back in the game and make you pay. From that vantage it’s disappointing we haven’t been able to make the most of being in front. Having said that, I am proud of the way we have competed.

“This team has grown so ­quickly. We are still a very young side. It wasn’t too long ago we were at Hobart and it was the end of the world, so I’m proud of the way we have been able to turn things around and really compete in these conditions.

“Coming over here we were written off, we were going to lose 4-0, but the way we competed it has been great to be part of a fantastic series played in a good style and credit has to go to India for winning 2-1.”

Smith singled out Nathan Lyon for his performance. The spinner took 18 wickets in the ­series after being questioned for his efforts in Sri Lanka last year.

“Nathan Lyon, the way that he has been able to adapt and bowl the way we want him to bowl, he has got two five-wicket hauls, both in the first innings,” he said. “He was able to change things up, when guys were sweeping him he was willing to throw the fast one in to stop them and make them ­defend, things like that.

“It’s good that these guys are thinking about the game and ­finding ways to have success in these conditions. It’s been a great learning curve for all the boys in the room. They are hurting now. It’s always tough when you lose a series at the final hurdle, but the guys are going to take so much out of this series.”


Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-29, 11:26 AM Reply #159 »

India v Australia, 4th Test, Dharamsala, 4th dayMarch 28, 2017

Smith's pride and pain at successful failure








Forty-seven years ago the Apollo 13 moon mission was termed "a successful failure" in that it failed to reach its ultimate goal, but still proved a triumph over enormous adversity after a major explosion mid-flight. In Dharamsala, Australia's captain Steven Smith was left with a similar sentiment, after a series that gained his men so much, even if not delivering the final victory.

It was certainly a long way from Hobart humiliation to honourable defeat in Dharamsala. Even so, Smith still had to balance the obvious pride he took in his side's Indian effort with the unavoidable pain of defeat, worst of all in circumstances where the tourists led the series and then held strong positions in all matches.

In time, Smith and the rest of the touring squad will be able to appreciate how great their strides were, but for now he was clear in stating that much improvement remained to be done for Australia to become the consistent Test match force he wants to see. Chiefly, Smith wants to see the ruthlessness to take full advantage of the strong positions the team's smart preparation and skill were able to generate.

"Right now, [I feel] a bit of disappointment. We have fought very hard throughout this series and to fall over at the final hurdle hurts," Smith said after the Dharamsala Test. "We have played a good style of cricket and competed in every Test match. And for that I am really proud of the boys.

"This team has grown so quickly. We are still a very young side. It wasn't too long ago we were at Hobart and it was the end of the world. So I am proud of the way we have been able to turn things around and really compete in these conditions. Coming over here, we were written off. [People said] we were going to lose 4-0. But we competed [and it has] has been great to be part of a fantastic series played in a good style. Credit has to go to India for winning 2-1.

"We can take a lot out of the way we played, the plans we had. We just needed to do it a little bit longer at times and be a bit more consistent. We've certainly had our opportunities to win games against a quality opposition like India. They get back in the game and make you pay. From that vantage [sic] it's disappointing we haven't been able to make the most of being in front. Having said that, I am proud of the way we have competed."

Smith said offspinner Nathan Lyon was his Man of the Series © AFP

Among the areas Smith saw progress was in how he and his team had been able, at times, to adapt to the Asian tempo. They played a holding action for long periods, whether with the bat or in the field, but were able to switch to the offensive whenever opportunity beckoned. Some instances of the series - like day two in Bengaluru or day three in Dharamsala - showed this was not a skill that could be immediately gained without missteps, but it was a far better attempt than on Smith's previous Asian tour, to Sri Lanka last year.

"They've played a pretty aggressive style of games at times and defensive at others and that's something I have learned as well," Smith said of India. "You have to go with the flow at times in India. If you build pressure and get a wicket, things can happen quickly. I learned a lot from playing in Sri Lanka and here about the different tempos of the game and how to handle different situations. Similarly, they hold and hold and wait for an opening and then they go for the kill."

In assessing his players, Smith saved special praise for Nathan Lyon, a bowler who had come under concerted pressure following that Sri Lanka trip. Many hours of thought and practice over the home summer, followed by long spells in Dubai, allowed Lyon to emerge as a bowler of high quality in all conditions. As Matthew Wade said so audibly on stump microphone during the fourth Test, he is a "one-trick pony" no longer.

"Lyon, [for] the way that he has been able to adapt and bowl the way we want him to bowl," Smith said when nominating his Man of the Series. "He has got two five-wicket hauls, both in the first innings of the game. He was able to change things up. When guys were sweeping him, he was willing to throw the fast one in to stop them and make them defend.

"It's good that these guys are thinking about the game and finding ways to succeed in these conditions, it's been a great learning curve for all the boys in the room. They are hurting now. It's always tough when you lose a series at the final hurdle but the guys are going to take so much out of this series."

As for the return of Pat Cummins, Smith's eagerness to unleash him once again in more favourable conditions was abundantly clear. "I was really impressed with Patty Cummins. The pace he was able to generate, both here and in Ranchi on a relatively slow wicket was absolutely amazing - he puts in [effort] every single ball," Smith said.

"The way he was able to bounce guys out in Ranchi was quite phenomenal to be honest. He's obviously going to be a big player for us going forward. He's had a pretty rough run with injuries and a pretty long layoff between Tests - five years or thereabouts. It's been great for him to get his body right and get back playing Test cricket. He's a really exciting prospect and I look forward to seeing him bowl in the future."

Apollo 13's commander, Jim Lovell, never again flew in space, and never set foot on the moon. Smith at least has the consolation of knowing he is comfortably young enough to go back to India next time, when the lessons of the past six weeks will give a more seasoned team the chance to finish what they started here.

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. @danbrettig


Online winner

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« 2017-Mar-29, 12:39 PM Reply #160 »
Bubba are you prepared to call the series to India yet ?

The Aussies performed better than I thought they would. I said at the start 3-0 but the Aussies managed to win a test for 2-1 so that is something to take away from the series.

The poor showing from Kohli showed India is more than a  1 man team. What it may also be is the beginning of opposing teams really laying into Kohli in the belief it may put him off his game.

Looking forward to the IPL.

Online Bubbasmith

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« 2017-Mar-29, 05:31 PM Reply #161 »
Winner, I thought India should have won the third test as time beat them to bowl Australia all out. The 2-1 result inflates Australia's performance it should have been 3-1.
When do India next play a series in Australia ?

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-29, 06:39 PM Reply #162 »
5 days and 450 overs was not enough time for them in the 3rd test ?

Offline gunbower

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« 2017-Mar-29, 08:07 PM Reply #163 »
Is this bloke "Authorised "Australian Cricket's media manager. I have never read such rubbish. They lost two Test matches when they couldn't muster over 140 in two second innings and yet he and a few other cricket commentators would have us believe that they covered themselves in glory . Gee , how our expectations have slipped. The superstar opener averaged 24 which is way below par.
This means he now averages 35 on wickets outside Australia. A good 10 runs per innings less than what is even reasonable. Is it any wonder they failed .

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-29, 08:12 PM Reply #164 »
I have no idea who this Authorised bloke is.

Offline gunbower

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« 2017-Mar-29, 08:15 PM Reply #165 »
Clueless hey, no surprise there

Online Bubbasmith

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« 2017-Mar-29, 08:19 PM Reply #166 »
The letter S or the letter Z, explains Z's response.

Offline gunbower

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« 2017-Mar-29, 08:53 PM Reply #167 »
For nothing better to do I checked the spelling world to ascertain whether an "S " or a "Z" is appropriate. Apparently the use of a "Z" is appropriate in the United States and Canada but in all other English spelling dominions the Use of an "S " is the correct form. So not only is our correspondent ignorant about all matters cricket but he cannot even spell his non de plume.

Offline sobig

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« 2017-Mar-29, 09:00 PM Reply #168 »
As this is a racing forum gunbower, I think it would be reasonable to assume a long time user
would have his "nom de plume" named after a good horse.

Offline gunbower

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« 2017-Mar-29, 10:17 PM Reply #169 »
Sobig , I assure you my comments were "tongue in cheek ".However as my scant research has revealed , that as "Authorized " was an Irish horse , this proves  his connections knew as much about the correct way to spell the horse's name as our friend knows about Cricket.

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Mar-29, 11:52 PM Reply #170 »
Thanks for your contribution gunbower.

I see your only other contribution to this thread goes pretty much with what I was saying but Hey, what would WE know ?

Offline mortdale

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« 2017-Mar-30, 01:07 AM Reply #171 »
Guys, it's time to face facts.

We got our backsides smacked well and truly.

We can try or angles and use all the analysis aids available to us, but we got smacked.

Losing Starc didn't help, not just because of his bowling but he was always likely to score a quick 20 plus batting at 8 or 9.

Face it we have struggled in India for years and the question must be asked are we picking batting techniques that suit Indian conditions?

Mitch Marsh, please give me a break. An all rounder that bats at 6 and hardly bowled an over. What was that all about. If he was injured and couldn't bowl you couldn't possibly pick him to bat at 6 as a specialist batsman only.

The exclusion of Usman Khawaja. Again the question has to be asked why was he not included after the 2nd test?

I have had mates say they didn't consider Usman Khawaja because they already had 3 left handers in the top 4.

All I can say is that I would prefer another left hander scoring runs instead of a right hander not scoring runs. Makes common sense to me.

I had stated before the series that I was concerned that Warner wouldn't adapt to Indian conditions. This is not a "I told you so" moment it is just to say I have full faith in Warner on fast pitches with the ball coming onto the bat with regular bounce.

Smith, hard to knock his batting but his Captaincy left a lot to be desired.

Okay, here is a question. Who else would you pick to Captain Australia? Personally I keep coming back to Smith. So who out of the brainstrust is "coaching" the Captain?

Why isn't someone like Steve Waugh in the "brainstrust" group offering Smith some one on one Captaincy coaching.

The sledging from both sides reached a new low. Kohli has a real issue and he needs to lighten up especially towards his own team mates. Wade needs to focus more on his keeping than trying to be the "Sledging King".

I'm sorry, I might be getting old but the respect for the game has dropped away dramatically.

Even in the era of Ian Chappell there was plenty of sledging but both sides would have a beer together after each days play. When sledging gets this personal the match officials have to stand up and take total control. Large fines don't work but match suspensions will.

Well hopefully the Ashes Series will be a ripper and something to look forward to.


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