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Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Mar-20, 11:27 AM Reply #125 »
https://www.golfdigest.com/story/brad-faxon-saved-his-childhood-club-members-are-now-suing-him-for-fraud-the-curious-case-of-metacomet-golf-club?mbid=nl_031920_daily_hitlist

Golf Digest story on the life and death of Metacomet Golf Course in Rhode Island....bought to be saved only to be sold to developers litigation by disgusted members to present their case.

North Lakes in Brisbane recently sold Victoria Park a BCC owned property to be transformed into a public park limited golfing facilities to be retained.

Many golf clubs in trouble and are looking to redevelop part of their holdings into real estate to survive.

FORE :beer:   

Offline timw

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« 2020-Mar-28, 06:32 PM Reply #126 »
Email from my golf club today said Golf Australia recommended the closure of all clubs.  Mine is now closed (suburban Melbourne).  Public course website where I sometimes play says temporarily closed.  That is the end of golf. Hard to imagine how horse racing is still going.

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2020-Mar-28, 06:38 PM Reply #127 »
Dumb decision

Offline Jeunes

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« 2020-Mar-28, 06:54 PM Reply #128 »

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2020-Mar-30, 07:34 AM Reply #129 »
 Neither should be shut down imo

Offline timw

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« 2020-Mar-30, 05:27 PM Reply #130 »
A friend has texted me to say his golf club has sent him a membership renewal notice the day after his course was closed.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Mar-31, 12:48 PM Reply #131 »
https://www.golf.org.au/covid-19/

Latest recommendation from Golf Australia ....clubs should close......it's a matter for individual clubs ..there's no restriction by Qld Health ..some clubs are closing others are still open..this might change if any positives arise to the virus....my golf club has reported two persons with symptoms one member one staffer ..the course is closed and a skeleton crew is keeping working on the course ..the club says it has adequate cash reserves last about 8 months ..that figure would include fees paid to 30 June which could be credited towards the 2020/2021 season we have to wait and see what the decision makers decide.  . The big issue facing all clubs not just golf clubs is that the end of the financial year is only 3 months away ..there's the question of Board positions expiring at the AGM the provisions of Constitutions which require timely notice to be given of AGM's subscription renewals elections etc all of which must be concerning club management and elected executives...with the restricted assembly laws......guvments may need to make provision for these issues which are not contemplated in my golf club's constitution and I expect all or most other clubs are in the same predicament.

FORE :beer:

 

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Mar-31, 05:12 PM Reply #132 »
Pandemic Golf........A little long to read---but heck what else are you doing?
 
 
March Madness is cancelled, the NBA is shut down, the Masters is postponed, and my Aunt Marge’s senior bowling has even thrown in the towel. Now restaurants and bars are closed, and our 40-handicap governor is threatening to shut down all entertainment facilities including golf courses. I have not tested positive, but the coronavirus is killing me.
There is nowhere to go and nothing to do. My wife suggested we take a walk, but I don’t walk anywhere unless I have a golf club in my hand and it’s cart path only. My kids have a restraining order on us and won’t let us come within 200 yards of the grandchildren. And we can no longer eat out, but when we tried to cook at home, there were cobwebs in the oven.
 
The network channels are inundated with coverage of the virus. The golf channel has been showing reruns of old tournaments, which are almost as riveting as watching my brother-in-law’s video of his family camping trip to Yellowstone. And my wife is so desperate for something to do, she is even considering sex, and maybe even with me.
Paranoia is off the tracks. Before the shutdown, we were having dinner at a local bar. I let out a loud sneeze and everyone at the surrounding tables started yelling "check please." My stock portfolio is plummeting and most of our cash is currently invested in toilet paper. I am washing my hands 137 times a day. I don’t touch anyone. I don’t even touch myself. I have been using tongs to go to the bathroom. This has to stop.
 
Our society and economy have been crippled by a microscopic virus. Scientists have not yet determined the exact origin but have narrowed it down to a Chinese fish market or Rosie O’Donnell’s bathtub. And no one is sure how to prevent or cure it. In the past, the ways to prevent contracting a contagious disease were simple: don’t eat in restaurants with cat on the menu and don’t date my college roommate’s sister.
 
I don’t consider myself to be in the high risk category. I have been building up my immune system by eating one meal per day at MacDonald’s for the last 25 years. Germs just slide through me. My only pre-existing condition is an inability to launch a golf ball further than 180 yards. And, according to the CDC, symptoms of the coronavirus are sweats, dizziness, and trouble breathing, which I experience whenever I am standing over a 3 foot putt. I can handle it.
 
So, I proposed to my regular foursome the idea of escaping from our self-imposed Stalag 17 and venturing outside for a round of golf. Everyone recognized the danger and severity of the situation. But when faced with the decision to remain sequestered with our wives or to risk contracting a deadly virus, it was a no-brainer. Every man opted to play golf.
 
Our foursome does not pose a medical risk to mankind. My friend, George is virus free. Social distancing has not been a problem for him. Other than us, he doesn’t have any friends. Bob, my neighbor is a urologist who has been working from home for several weeks. He has developed a way to do remote prostate exams by having patients sit on their cell phone. And our other partner, Jerry tested himself with a kit he bought online. However, he thinks he may have gotten the wrong kit. It showed no traces of the virus but indicated that he was pregnant with twins.
 
The federal government has established guidelines for social engagement. For example, you must stay at least 6 feet apart and no more than 10 people are allowed at a gathering, which means Patrick Reed’s fan club can still meet. In addition, our foursome drafted our own specific set of rules for Pandemic Golf.
 
Rules of Play:
 
• Hazmat suits are permitted. As an alternative, one can wear a college mascot costume or big bunny pajamas.
• Masks are not permitted, because we would look more like stagecoach robbers than a foursome.
• Leave the flag in. And to avoid retrieving balls from the hole, any putt shorter than Lebron James is good.
• Ride in separate golf carts and don’t come closer to another player than a fully extended ball retriever.
• Don’t touch another player’s balls. This is always good advice.
• No high fives. Fortunately, we seldom have a reason.
• No petting the geese or the cart girl.
• Don’t use the spot-a-pot. More disease in there than in all of Wuhan China.
• No excuses. Slicing or hooking are not side effects of the coronavirus.
• Make an online bank transfer to pay off your bets for the day.
• Straddle the sprinkler on the 18th hole before getting into the car.
 
These rules and restrictions adequately protected us from contamination. Unfortunately, there is no vaccine for bad golf. I had trouble gripping the club with oven mittens, but it was an enjoyable afternoon which ended way too soon. There were no handshakes on the 18thgreen, no beers at the bar, and we drove home separately.
 
As the pandemic plays through, it is giving us a glimpse into our inevitable future where all meals are delivered, all entertainment comes through the tv screen, and all human interaction is through our cell phone. Where schooling is online at home, exercise is on a stationary bike in our basement, medical testing is done at drive thru windows, and colonoscopies are performed at Jiffy Lube. The world is changing. It is becoming less interpersonal as technology consumes us. So now that we have time on our hands, everyone should take a moment to cherish this fading era, when friends still get together to hit a little ball around an open field for no good reason other than to enjoy the companionship of their fellow man.

Some light relief from a golfer in the USA.

FORE :beer:



Offline timw

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« 2020-Mar-31, 07:06 PM Reply #133 »
Thanks Arsenal

There will be a baby boom in 9 months time and it won’t be my fault.  My wife wants the girls to have children before she is too old to look after them but only one has a boyfriend and I guess they won’t be adding to the population anytime soon.  A couple of weeks ago I found out I had played golf with a gentleman who performed the dreaded colonoscopy and I told him if I had known I would not have played with him.  Even worse he told me his wife had been in Milan and had just got home via Dublin and Paris.  I am still alive so I suppose I shouldn’t complain on either account.

As an aside, today, I spent about 30 minutes in the backyard practicing chipping with a plastic golf ball and I also did my stretching exercises and ‘light’ weights in the hope I may still be alive when golf resumes in Melbourne.  Just remember everything looks good if there is some red to drink (or white if you live in warmer climes) as there is sure as hell nothing on free TV and the libraries are closed.

Offline Gintara

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« 2020-Mar-31, 07:47 PM Reply #134 »
Neither should be shut down imo

Wily I know I two courses who shut before the recommendation from Golf Australia simply because people are idiots - they will not do what they are told.

One put all the measures in place yet when the manager walked to the pro shop he was horrified to see blokes high fiving on the PG and too many people in the shop, he walked back to his office and called the committee to say what he was doing.

Another told me that it looked terrible in the community to see their car park full, the driving range chock-a-block so they just shut it down.

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2020-Mar-31, 08:31 PM Reply #135 »
Gin,  my local driving range has been deserted for the past few weeks. Ive gone 6 times and never had more than 3 other people, stretched over a 100m
It’s probably the safest place in the planet  :lol:

Offline timw

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« 2020-Apr-01, 06:36 PM Reply #136 »
Got a text today indicating NSW courses were still open whereas every Vic course is closed. Is NSW still open ????

Also got a text from someone who was walking to his small country course (1 hr north of melb) with a 5 iron and a few balls for practice when he saw the local cops on patrol at the course so he went home.  It is possible during normal times to regularly play that course without seeing anyone. 

Offline pwa54

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« 2020-Apr-01, 08:16 PM Reply #137 »
In Tasmania, no more than pairs are allowed with no sharing of golf carts, no rakes etc. I live overlooking a popular course and it's less busy than usual but there are plenty playing there.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Apr-05, 11:33 AM Reply #138 »
Golf has been reinstated at my Club from Friday ...initially on line bookings now only by phone to the pro shop no reason given possibly some complaints that not everyone has computer access..... pro shop has one phone line need to be patient trying to get through if everyone tries at the same time bookings open...rules are only two in as group..... 15 minute intervals which is very restrictive...... allowing only 70 players to get a game ......only social play no visitors..... one to a cart social distancing no rakes in bunkers don't touch the flag stick ....mostly sensible apart from the 15 minute gap.......which could easily be reduced to 6 or 7 minutes which is what we are used to .....and no revenue for the club apart from hire of golf carts.....no food offerings .....the pro shop open might sell a few soft drinks and possibly some golf accessories...I'm resisting the temptation ...will see how long I can last without my regular round ..have been playing 5 times a week before the shutdown.

FORE :beer:

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2020-Apr-05, 05:30 PM Reply #139 »
Arsey, why resist?

And 5 minutes between groups???
What the rush with you lot at your course. Who wants people up ya arse when your playing

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Apr-05, 05:49 PM Reply #140 »
Arsey, why resist?

And 5 minutes between groups???
What the rush with you lot at your course. Who wants people up ya arse when your playing
It's 15 minutes Wily enough time to have a cup of tea and some chocolate Tim Tams or a game of cards.

Still I'm in the vulnerable age group and don't want to take chances on Covid-19

Giddy Up :beer:

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2020-Apr-05, 06:02 PM Reply #141 »
I've got 4 very good courses with 15 minutes of my joint and mostly never encounter anyone to catch anything off.
Mind you a young lass was in front of me recently and my thoughts did wander momentarily to past deeds

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Apr-09, 08:47 AM Reply #142 »
My golf club which closed with Golf Australia's endorsement reopened on Friday a week ago which received Golf Australia's endorsement......Notification of the reopening  scheduled for 9am the following day was posted on the Club's website with online bookings allowing groups of 2 at 15 minute intervals... online bookings were subsequently canned and replaced with phone bookings to the Pro shop where there's only one line.... Bookings open one week ahead and the pro shop staff start at 7am

Today I rang precisely at 7am to make a booking for today week Thursday 16th April...... I received a recorded message along the lines of "I'm sorry we are unable to take your call please leave a message after the tone"    I then left a message ...asked for a booking if possible before 12 but no later than 3pm next Thursday....at the time I rang right on the dot of 7am the time sheet showed 70 spots were available .....maybe I got lucky and my booking will be there.... once I can open the time sheet when it's unlocked I'll find out.

Refreshing the booking sheet at 7.39am there were 47 vacancies at 7.46 there were 37 vacancies at 8.01am there were only 18 vacancies at 8.16am there were 9 vacancies.
 
Yesterday I rang the Captain he returned my call promptly I advocated for more realistic gaps from the current 15 minutes suggesting that 8 minutes would allow more players ...he said they had decided on 15 minutes as a recommendation of Golf Australia....... this is the mob that changed from one position to another on closing and reopening .....in any event it has no authority to impose such conditions on golf clubs......I have heard other clubs are still running comps with normal time gaps between groups.... Sanctuary Cove has an 8 minute gap...... I also asked why there's only one tee hit off he said  that was to prevent members congregating.....  abiding by social distancing would prevent congregating ..the club's instructions to members is turn up 10 minutes before hit off only two members at a time in the Pro shop so there's no congregating.....I'm not hopeful there'll be any relaxation of the booking system any time soon ..although the Captain said things are under constant review....just now there are only 8 vacancies.

FORE :beer:

Offline timw

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« 2020-Apr-20, 07:53 PM Reply #143 »
I can only speculate that Premier Andrews will not let golfers play in Victoria because he is reportedly a member of Kingston Heath and any decision to allow play might look like a nod to privilege. 

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Apr-28, 04:29 PM Reply #144 »
https://www.golfaustralia.com.au/news/should-victorians-be-allowed-to-play-golf-546932

Golf Australia sitting on the fence.

Restrictions are to be eased in QLD from  next Saturday .....possibly there may be some relaxation to allow golf clubs to get back to near normal conditions with social distancing maintained .......it might be possible to allow more than the two persons in a group ...might even get back to groups of four ..wouldn't that be good ....probably wishful thinking ..I'm a half full type ...it's very difficult to get a game where I play due to 10 minute tee times as only one tee start is possible with a limit of 110 players each day when there are 400 odd members who would like to play .....online bookings open 8 days in advance .......there is lots of dissatisfaction with the Board ...one group has been emailing members to vote in favour of a no confidence motion ...a preliminary to moving for the Board's removal .....which requires a Extraordinary General Meeting but there's nowhere to go with it as there's no possibility of holding any  meeting due to COVID-19.

FORE :beer:

Offline timw

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« 2020-May-10, 12:11 PM Reply #145 »
Golf club is hopeful play resumes in Victoria from Tuesday.  If the go ahead is given the plan is to limit members to no more than a couple of rounds a week so everyone gets a chance to play. I have done all the 'pre season training' so can't wait to get back into it.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2020-May-29, 10:33 AM Reply #146 »
The Majors Schedule 2020

US Masters. Augusta National. Georgia, USA. 12 - 15 November 2020.
U.S. Open. Winged Foot Golf Club. New York, USA. 17-20 September 2020.
The Open. Royal St George's. Sandwich, Kent. 15-18 July 2021.
USPGA Championship. TPC Harding Park. San Francisco, California. 6-9 August 2020.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Jun-26, 08:27 AM Reply #147 »

The PGA Tour continues to balance the risks of positive cases. But which risks exactly?

With the help of a virus expert, understanding where the PGA Tour's "bubble" is especially fragile
By Brian Wacker


1249645110

Tom Pennington

A PGA Tour bubble is a noble if not simple objective.

The concept upon returning to competition earlier this month was quite basic: to shield tour events, including players, from the risks of COVID-19 even as the virus surges in parts of the U.S. The reality, as made apparent by a handful of positive tests in recent days, has proven far more elusive.

“It’s a myth,” Dr. Matthew Binnicker, director of clinical virology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said of the possibility of an operational bubble that zig-zags across the country, with hundreds upon hundreds drifting in and out of its path every week. “Even in health care, there’s no way we can operate at zero risk. You have to take steps to mitigate and lower risk, but with this virus you can’t put in place anything other than saying everyone has to stay at home inside their house.

“It’s impossible to operate inside a bubble. It’s not real life.”


That the Tour, though exhaustive in its efforts, would be exempt from reality is of course as much a fantasy as a J.K. Rowling novel, something it seems acutely aware of. Yes, officials knew there would be positive tests, which is why it made several suggestions within its protocols to mitigate the risk.

“We feel like we put ourselves in a position where we can have a controlled environment or a controlled number of cases or positive cases going forward,” Commissioner Jay Monahan said on Wednesday.

What’s become apparent is there’s very little that the Tour can truly control. Its guidelines are merely that, and as such not enforceable. Even if in use, in order to be effective, everyone—players, caddies, coaches, trainers, equipment reps, wives, girlfriends, nannies, chefs, et al.—would need to abide. Total adherence is difficult if not impossible given human nature. Even the commissioner conceded as much.

“When you get in the environment in the tournament, with no spectators here and with very few people here, with people that are around you having tested negative, I think over the first couple weeks, we’ve seen some instances where let’s say we’ve gotten a little bit lax or away from protocol,” he said. “Full disclosu I’ve done it myself.”

To wit, on Tuesday, Brooks Koepka spoke of the lengths he has gone to in order to maintain a bubble with his team. But his chef still needs to go to the grocery store and last week, Koepka’s caddie, Ricky Elliott, attended the funeral of a friend in Orlando, where he was joined by Graeme McDowell and his caddie Ken Comboy. Elliott and Comboy later tested positive. Koepka, who stayed in the same house with Elliott in Hilton Head, and McDowell, who spent six hours in a car with Comboy on his way to the island and roomed with him once there, withdrew from this week’s Travelers Championship for precautionary reasons. Likewise, Brooks’ younger brother Chase also withdrew, as did Webb Simpson when he discovered a family member he’d been around tested positive.

Though McDowell, both Koepkas and Simpson have since tested negative, it doesn’t take an infectious disease expert to connect the dots on the possibility of spread. We asked one anyway. “When someone is infected and around someone who is susceptible to the virus, the rate of transmitting is in the range of two to three additional people,” Dr. Binnicker said.

Never mind that many players and caddies, and those in the various “bubbles” also live in Arizona, Florida and Texas, all currently viral hot zones. Cameron Champ, who withdrew from the Travelers on Monday, tested negative at Colonial three weeks ago, went home to Houston for a week, flew privately by himself to Connecticut and tested positive when he got there.

So what are the various risks and their levels of concern for the Tour as it marches forward in its porous bubble? They are numerous but also dependent on a number of factors.
On the golf course

Inside the competition remains the safest and most controllable environment for the Tour. Outdoors, no fans, easy to social distance—though there have been habitual norms like fist-bumping and exchanging of clubs and towels between player and caddie that have been difficult to shake.

RELATED: The new rules of playing golf safely

“Golf is probably one of the safest sports in terms of risk of transmission, versus a sport like basketball or football, where the athletes are interacting in close proximity,” Dr. Binnicker said. “If you maintain distance, especially outside, six feet apart, and you’re wearing a mask, the risk is very low, less than 1 percent.”

Players and caddies are not wearing masks during competition, and indications are that only a small percentage of them are wearing them elsewhere on property at a tournament, but the open air and with an ability to spread out the risk decreases significantly. Things get tricky from there, however.
Clubhouse, locker room, other enclosed spaces on site

The next highest level of risk is within the confines of the structures of the courses the Tour travels to week after week. The same principles about mask wearing and social distancing that apply outdoors similarly apply in these environments, but the risks go up in enclosed spaces.

“Indoor events have a little higher risk because outside there is more humidity and respiratory droplets from people are bigger and fall to the ground faster,” Dr. Binnicker said. “Inside, it’s not as humid so those respiratory droplets are smaller, stay in the air longer and spread farther.”
Hotels and other accommodations

Though the Tour has provided host hotels each week as an extension of its bubble, protection is something of a fallacy because they are merely blocking off rooms rather than taking over the entire property, meaning there are hundreds of other people to account for who are coming and going.

A rented house may indeed be a better option but even that relies on its occupants, both current and previous, and their actions. A handful of people shacking up in the same shared space for a week could be as problematic if not more so than a hotel.

“We worry when an individual with COVID is around other people who are susceptible for more than 10 minutes,” Dr. Binnicker said. “That’s the time we go from low-risk to high-risk exposure. That exposure can be reduced by wearing a mask. Talking to each other for 30 minutes, the risk isn’t zero but with a mask the protection rate is in the 80-85 percent range.”
Restaurants, bars, other public settings

Then there are the casual elements of everyday life, from dining out, to catching a movie or hitting the mall. Restrictions vary by state and city but as Justin Thomas noted last week, Hilton Head, a popular vacation destination with few restrictions and now with a spike in cases, was a “zoo.”

Engaging in such environments therefore presents a much higher risk. It is also another element that is ultimately out of the Tour’s reach in terms of control.

“Being in a small, confined bar or restaurant where people are huddled around, we’ve seen bars in Florida, for example, be some of the biggest sources for COVID over the last week or two as people go out,” Dr. Binnicker said. “That’s a real hot spot for transmission. You’ve got people talking loudly, not wearing masks because they are drinking or eating. It’s a prime location for the spread of the virus.”
Airplanes

So, too, of course are commercial flights and all the elements associated with barnstorming across the country.

Some players fly privately, and the Tour has offered a charter from one tournament to the next. But it gets more complicated and riskier for those who take commercial flights and when those in the bubble come in and out of it in between events. Put another way, there’s no way of knowing what a player is doing on his off week.

“The risk goes up quite a bit having a similar group of athletes going from city to city because they’re getting on a plane and interacting with more people,” Dr. Binnicker said. “I wouldn’t want to have to play in Jacksonville (Fla.) or Arizona right now because the number of cases are way up.

“Moving a group of people is higher risk than being in one location. It really depends on the actions of all those people. If you have control over those people, they’re doing a good job wearing masks and maintaining distance, the risks will be a lot lower. But if you’re not doing a good job after the work day is done the risk is a lot higher.”

Now what?

The Tour has implemented more protocols to its plan with an additional test for those arriving via charter, coaches now included as part of testing and bringing its fitness trailer on-site and requiring all those inside it to wear masks.

But there are still uncertainties even when it comes to testing itself. In short, a negative result isn’t necessarily a blank check.

“If some tested negative at tournament it means something for a day or two,” Dr. Binnicker said. “If they go back home and are interacting with people, the result of the test the prior weekend doesn’t mean much anymore because they can be exposed to others.

“Golf tournaments having testing prior to each tournament is a good idea. It gives them a snapshot. But it’s difficult to know or control people’s actions. Just because you test negative on Day 1 doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to continue to be negative for more than few days unless you quarantine.”

So why doesn’t the Tour test every day?

“One of the things that we committed to when we committed our testing protocol was to not take away resources from every community where we are moving to and where we are playing,” Monahan said. “So there’s a finite number of supplies we could get at that point in time. Secondly, when you go back to our medical advisors, as we have done, and this is something we continue to talk to them about, and you look at CDC guidelines and you look at the expectation of any business like ours that’s reopening, testing every other day is a sound and accepted protocol for the environment that we’re in.”

As for the rest of the myriad risks that exist, the Tour, in essence, has said it’s willing to take them.

“I think we all need to remind ourselves that we’re all learning to live with this virus, and we all need to learn to live with this virus, both as individuals, as family members and certainly within our businesses,” Monahan said. “It’s pretty clear that this virus isn’t going anywhere.”

When it comes to pausing its season again, the Tour isn’t budging either.

https://www.golfdigest.com/story/pga-tour-risks?utm_medium=email&utm_source=062520&utm_campaign=hitlist


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