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Offline Authorized

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O.P. « 2016-Jun-02, 02:51 PM »

NRL match-fixing: NSW Organised Crime Squad investigating rugby league games

Kate McClymont 
Published: June 2, 2016 - 1:44PM

The NSW Organised Crime Squad are investigating two NRL matches after claims of match-fixing emerged on Thursday morning.

A round 16, 2015 match between South Sydney Rabbitohs and Manly Sea Eagles, which Souths won 20-8, and a round 24 clash between Manly and Parramatta Eels, which the Eels won 20-16 are the pair in question.

"The Organised Crime Squad is in the early stages of examining information to alleged match fixing in the NRL," a police spokeswoman told Fairfax Media.

"No further comment is appropriate at this stage."

The NRL responded to the news in a press release at midday on Thursday, stating that the body is cooperating with authorities in relation to information regarding the allegations.

An NRL spokesman said the NRL would continue to cooperate with authorities.
 
"The NRL is treating this as a serious matter and will take any action necessary to protect the integrity of the game," the spokesman said.

The revelations come a week after Parramatta Eels five-eighth Corey Norman was issued with an official warning for consorting with criminals. Norman has also been linked to a pills investigation at The Star casino that occurred later that night.

Norman, Eels teammate Junior Paulo and Penrith Panthers star James Segeyaro received the notices after Fairfax Media published a photo of the NRL trio dining at The Century Chinese restaurant with former bikies boss Paulie Younan and alleged fraudster and money launderer Rafat Alameddine.

There is no suggestion these three players are involved in the match-fixing investigation.

Mr Alameddine's younger brother, Talal, is in Goulburn's Supermax prison, charged with supplying the gun used to kill NSW police accountant Curtis Cheng at Parramatta last year.

The events prompted NRL CEO Todd Greenberg to issue a warning that all players and officials were on notice to choose their friends and associates wisely.

He said players should take very seriously the warnings issued by the organised crime squad under Section 93X of the Crimes Act.

"This reflects poorly on the players involved and is a bad look for the game," Mr Greenberg said. "I would expect those who have received warnings to take them very seriously."

"The penalties for ignoring a warning are severe and we fully support the police in the action they have taken."


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« 2016-Jun-02, 02:52 PM Reply #1 »

Eddie Hayson embroiled in NRL match-fixing investigation

Kate McClymont 
Published: June 2, 2016 - 2:25PM

Controversial gambler and former brothel owner Eddie Hayson is embroiled in a NSW police investigation into allegations of match-fixing in two NRL games last year.

One of the matches being investigated is a 2015 match between South Sydney Rabbitohs and Manly Sea Eagles.

The week before the match, Mr Hayson is alleged to have collected $500,000 in cash to bet on the match. The bet involved Souths winning by more than eight points.

 A jockey, on the instructions of Mr Hayson, is also understood to have wagered $120,000 on the same outcome with a bookmaker. Mr Hayson later instructed the jockey to put another $100,000 on but the bookmaker refused the second wager.

"The reason it [the betting] didn't come under suspicion was because the Rabbits were favourites. They were giving away seven and a half points. So they had to win by eight points or more which they did win," said a source who declined a request by Mr Hayson to contribute to the scheme.

He said Mr Hayson told him six players were involved. "Eddie did tell me there were six players and he had to give 50 large [$50,000] to each one," said the source.

A statement from NSW police said: "The Organised Crime Squad is in the early stages of examining information to alleged match fixing in the NRL. No further comment is appropriate at this stage."

The round 16 game between South Sydney and Manly took place on Friday June 26 at ANZ Stadium in Sydney

Souths led Manly 6-4 at half-time. The Rabbitohs were coming off a bye, having lost 34-6 to Wests Tigers in their previous game. Manly were at the bottom of the ladder but had just beaten the Tigers 30-20. Betting agencies contacted by Fairfax Media said that there was no suspicious betting activity on that match. 

Separately, Mr Hayson, who has been banned from betting at the TAB, has angrily denied widespread rumours he was behind beleaguered Parramatta Eels captain Kieran Foran's recently revealed $75,000 gambling spree.

According to the TAB's terms and conditions, only the account holder is allowed to use the account to bet.

Sources have confirmed Mr Hayson met Foran in Brisbane on May 20, the day after Foran's TAB account was allegedly used for a massive betting spree. According to News Corp $75,000 was lost from his betting account. "Nobody knows who made the bets on dogs and horses but the money has gone all the same," the Daily Telegraph reported.

Big bets from his account: parramatta eels skipper kieran foran.

Big bets from his account: Parramatta Eels skipper Kieran Foran. Photo: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

The frenzied betting included wages on greyhounds at Dapto, Albion Park and Sandown. This was followed by betting on South African horse races.

Fairfax Media has been informed Mr Hayson and Foran were seen meeting at the Manly team hotel as the Sea Eagles were in Brisbane to play the Broncos.

Foran, who remains close to some of the Manly players despite his switch to the Eels this season, was in Queensland receiving treatment for personal issues at a rehabilitation facility.

The Kiwi international, who is out for the season due to a shoulder injury, is understood to have instructed lawyers to start proceedings against the TAB for a breach of privacy.

Earlier this year Fairfax Media revealed Mr Hayson, already banned for life from the Star Casino, was banned from betting with the TAB.

In February the TAB instructed staff members to "no longer serve Edward (Eddie) Hayson ... due to suspicious ... activity".

"Please ensure your staff familiarise themselves with his face," said the missive. 

"Am I addicted? Well, it has been a problem over the years," Mr Hayson has previously told Fairfax Media while admitting he once placed a $1 million bet on a State of Origin game. In 2014, Mr Hayson lost control of his high-class brothel Stiletto and declared himself insolvent with debts of $52 million.

In 2006 Mr Hayson's friendship with Newcastle Knights star Andrew Johns brought a storm of publicity about Mr Hayson using inside information to win an estimated $2 million on a betting plunge.

Along with big-time punter Steve Fletcher, Mr Hayson wagered a fortune on the lowly placed New Zealand Warriors to beat the competition frontrunners Newcastle. Bookies were so confident of a Knights win they gave the Warriors a 16.5-point start.

Unbeknown to the public, and to the bookmakers, Johns had injured his neck at a weights session on the Thursday night before the Sunday game. Hayson, who owned racehorses with Johns and his brother Matthew, denied receiving inside information about Andrew Johns' neck injury. A subsequent NRL investigation found nothing amiss.

The other match the police are understood to be investigating involves information received from an organised crime figure that match-fixing allegedly took place in a round 24 clash in 2015 between Manly and Parramatta, which the Eels won 20-16.

Comments are being sought from Mr Hayson and Foran.

With Patrick Begley

Heavily linked with nrl players: eddie hayson.

Heavily linked with NRL players: Eddie Hayson. Photo: Andrew Meares

The Life and Times of Eddie Hayson

Born in 1968, Edward Kenneth Hayson is the son of the late Sadie "Sally" Hayson, who sold the Northbridge shopping centre for $80 million in 2004.

Underworld figures, Comanchero bikies, jockeys and rugby league players all frequented Hayson's Camperdown brothel Stiletto, once described as "the Taj Mahal of Sydney brothels". In 2012, a joint task force raided the Parramatta Road premises as part of "operational activity".

Bookmaker Tom Waterhouse and Suzee Fenech, wife of boxer Jeff Fenech, both had caveats over Hayson's brothel to secure money owed. Hayson has been one of the nation's biggest gamblers.

In 2006 he joined forces with another big-time punter, Steve Fletcher. The pair put $60,000 on the favourite, Lucy's Light, but moments before the obscure South Australian greyhound race, they stacked bets on other contenders, blowing out Lucy Light's odds from $1.10 to $13. The payout came to $700,000.

Another betting plunge the same year involved Hayson's friend, the then Newcastle Knights player Andrew Johns. Hayson raced horses with Johns and his brother Matthew. Armed with information that Andrew Johns was injured and unlikely to play, Hayson and Fletcher placed huge bets on the lowly placed Warriors to beat Newcastle. The pair allegedly netted more than $2 million.

Hayson's friendship with Johns was also at the centre of the 2013 More Joyous affair. Johns had allegedly heard from Gai Waterhouse's son, Tom, that his mother's horse couldn't win, a claim Tom denied. Johns was accused of passing the More Joyous tip on to Hayson, who passed it on to a jockey. No adverse findings were made against Waterhouse or Johns but Hayson was banned from NSW racecourses for six months for hindering the investigation that followed.

The father of two remains banned from Sydney's Star Casino and cannot enter a TAB.

He lost control of the brothel in 2104 after declaring himself insolvent, owing $52 million.


Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-02, 03:39 PM Reply #2 »
For some reason today I was trying to learn more about Tom Hayson, the patriarch of the dynasty.

I stumbled upon this less than flattering account.

Serial bankrupts?

Eddie's certainly pulling his weight.

Love to find Kate's review of Perkins' book.


Hi all,
I know Scott Balson will know why I am offended at the publishing of this
book - but it just really irks me that we get things soooo wrong!

I published this story on www.sydney.net today.

"DARE TO DREAM" A NIGHTMARE FOR SOME.
By Gary Knight.

A friend of mine sought me out on Friday and by the time he found me he was
bright purple with rage.

He was brandishing a copy of Kevin Perkins' latest tome to hit the book
shelves, "Dare To Dream" - subtitled the life and times of a proud
Australian.

Perkins who wrote such books as The Midas Man about T.J. Smith and was in
court constantly over his book in support of Bill Waterhouse (particularly
in relation to the Fine Cotton affair) in The Gambling Man, has really fell
off the planet this time.

The subject of his book is none other than Tom Hayson - the man who kept
putting companies into liquidation after doing a deal with the then NSW
Government to obtain the lease on Darling Harbour for the peppercorn rent of
one dollar a year for 99 years.

In fact, the Hayson family of which Tom is the patriarch could well be
described as serial bankrupts with well over 50 companies of theirs having
been deregistered or liquidated.


It is absolutely staggering that former Premiers Neville Wran and Nick
Greiner are featured on the back of the book - Wran being extraordinarily
"buddy buddy" with his comment that "If it wasn't for Tom Hayson there
wouldn't be a Darling Harbour."

Oh please!

What about the people who were totally put out of play under the Haysons'
reign at Darling Harbour?

I guess their probably not proud Australians - they were just appalling
businesspeople who fell for the Darling Harbour fanfare that was really over
the top.

One day, and it will be sooner than later, the real story of Darling Harbour
will be told - and there will be people walking around Sydney shell shocked.

Snippets have made the media at various times but the story in total is a
nightmare - not a dream for many people.

Reading Sydney Morning Herald journalist Kate McClymont's snipe at the book
in her recent "Sauce" column was the only entertainment I think I would get
from the book's advent.

My infuriated friend offered to leave his copy to read - I declined as I
have better things to do with my time.

I am just surprised he did not have better things to do with his $29.95.






https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/aus.education/_bruBxtoEaA

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-02, 04:07 PM Reply #3 »
Channel 9  News is apparently oblivious to the Hayson angle in this latest investigation.


Offline Jeunes

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« 2016-Jun-02, 10:26 PM Reply #4 »
Manly link with both games in dispute featuring them. Now SMH article is stating Foran an ex Manly player had a meeting and if you read between the lines, it is stating that this was after Foran went on a gambling spree with Eddie denying he used Forans account.

The lawyers are going to have a field day especially as the NRL seem to be floundering regarding this as Todd was not convincing enough at the press conference.

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-03, 10:54 AM Reply #5 »
Would help to learn who the jockey was.

The allegations seem to be about a weird variation of point shaving.

Not sure why you would need 6 players involved.

If the game happens to be going the way of the sting there's no need for any choreography.




http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/nrl/nrl-match-fixing-manly-sea-eagles-rocked-in-fix-fury-as-nsw-organised-crime-squad-investigates/news-story/6c97d1745fa97d0bbb7cb3671d476dc2

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« 2016-Jun-03, 01:16 PM Reply #6 »

Match fixing: NRL can't take money from gambling entities and be stunned at fixing

Peter FitzSimons 
Published: June 3, 2016 - 12:45PM

The weirdest thing? Despite the extremely grave nature of the allegations against the Sea Eagles throwing two matches of the NRL last years, there is so little outrage from the punters, on talk-back, on twitter, in letters.

Yes, we in the media are all over it, as is the NRL, but where are the poor bastards who lose the rent money every weekend rising up in BLIND FURY at the very idea that six players might have lined their own pockets for an alleged $50K a pop, at their expense?

So many people, see, don't seem to make the connection. It is viewed as a rort to do the bookies down – not good, but not outrageous. "They're bookies. They can afford it."

And yet, where do the bookies get that money from, you mugs? Of course every red cent of it comes from the punter who put their hard-earned on the other team, on what they think is a two-horse race, not knowing that the fix is in and that one horse ain't trying. The NRL is quite right to ban for life any player proven to have been involved.

But, as to the NRL, perhaps they could spare us the hand-wringing and the stunned expressions of whoever thought this might happen? Let's start with me.

It was always going to happen, just as it always has around the world when sport and gambling get in bed together.

And as TFF has long banged on about, the NRL can't have it both ways. They can't take in money hand over fist from every gambling entity going – the NSW Origin team on Wednesday night was sponsored by Star casino – plaster the broadcasts with gambling ads and then claim to be stunned at the cancer of corruption arising in fixed game results.

As I have said many times, taking the gambling money, is like sucking on Marlboros. It's fabulous! But the more you do it, the more you cough, and the more likely you are to get a tumour in your lungs. Sooner or later, either you die a miserable death or those who've spent too long around you do. We are seeing it – ALLEGEDLY – before our very eyes.

Meantime, it is, of course, not just the two Manly matches under renewed scrutiny, and one or two players involved in that 2009 match between the Roosters and the Cowboys may well be shifting uncomfortably

Huge money was on the Cowboys to win by 13 points or more. The Roosters were ahead 16-0 at half-time, only to lose by – wouldn't you know it?? -  32-16! 

The Herald reported at the time that the team broke down entirely because of it, with fingers pointed, and allegations made that the players concerned were, among other things, getting free services at a particular brothel ...

Stand by for more on that game to come out this week.


Offline sobig

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« 2016-Jun-03, 02:50 PM Reply #7 »
Would help to learn who the jockey was.

The allegations seem to be about a weird variation of point shaving.

Not sure why you would need 6 players involved.

If the game happens to be going the way of the sting there's no need for any choreography.




http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/nrl/nrl-match-fixing-manly-sea-eagles-rocked-in-fix-fury-as-nsw-organised-crime-squad-investigates/news-story/6c97d1745fa97d0bbb7cb3671d476dc2

I think the statement from the report

 "Hayson's friendship with Johns was also at the centre of the 2013 More Joyous affair. Johns had allegedly heard from Gai Waterhouse's son, Tom, that his mother's horse couldn't win, a claim Tom denied. Johns was accused of passing the More Joyous tip on to Hayson, who passed it on to a jockey. No adverse findings were made against Waterhouse or Johns but Hayson was banned from NSW racecourses for six months for hindering the investigation that followed."

gives a reasonable clue as to the possible identity of the (retired) jockey

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2016-Jun-03, 03:04 PM Reply #8 »
There is something not quite right with the mathematics being reported in the media.

Why would you spend $300,000 (6 x $50,000) to bribe players for only $200,000 worth of bets.

Not withstanding the fact that it would be obvious that something was up if the bets became too large.

Looks like he could only get set for $100,000 anyway.

Something just doesn't gel there  :chin:

Offline Authorized

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« 2016-Jun-03, 03:12 PM Reply #9 »
There is something not quite right with the mathematics being reported in the media.

Why would you spend $300,000 (6 x $50,000) to bribe players for only $200,000 worth of bets.

Not withstanding the fact that it would be obvious that something was up if the bets became too large.

Looks like he could only get set for $100,000 anyway.

Something just doesn't gel there  :chin:

I initially thought the same thing until it was pointed out to me he gets them in his pocket and they become cheaper and more vulnerable to further corruption in the future.



Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-03, 03:24 PM Reply #10 »

gives a reasonable clue as to the possible identity of the (retired) jockey
That's what has me puzzled.

Kate McClymont crafts her pieces extremely carefully. For prudent reasons.

The identity in question now has well publicised disconcerting new career.

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-03, 03:51 PM Reply #11 »
Looks like he could only get set for $100,000 anyway.

Something just doesn't gel there  :chin:
My bet is unlicensed outfits would also come into play.


Online wily ole dog

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« 2016-Jun-03, 05:06 PM Reply #12 »
Said jock pulled one of mine many years ago before he retired
Im not surprised

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-03, 06:31 PM Reply #13 »
Hayson to sue!

Maybe this should go on the joke thread?

https://twitter.com/7NewsSydney/status/738643628084465664

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« 2016-Jun-03, 08:25 PM Reply #14 »
Pay Wall
Schmay Wall


Manly players were warned against socialising with ex-brothel owner Eddie Hayson and porn baron Con Ange
21 minutes ago
MICHAEL CARAYANNIS & REBECCA WILSONThe Daily Telegraph
Subscriber Exclusive Icon

SENIOR Manly officials warned players to stop socialising with ex-brothel baron Eddie Hayson and porn shop tsar Con Ange.

The warnings came as the club grew increasingly concerned about the company they were keeping and the amount of money they were gambling in a range of non-rugby league related sports.

The concerns dated as far back as two years ago with Manly hierarchy so perturbed by the association of some of its players that they met with the then NRL head of football Todd Greenberg to discuss the company some players were keeping.

Club officials grew increasingly concerned with the growing friendships between several players including Kieran Foran, Brett Stewart, Glenn Stewart, David Williams and Anthony Watmough and Hayson and Con Ange in recent years.

Hayson has strenuously denied fixing matches while there is no suggestion Ange or the players mentioned have played any part in rigging results.

Ange made headlines last year when he was ambushed outside his Crows Nest home last month by “cheap standover men” while his house was later firebombed. Police believe the firebombing related to his porn shop business, rather than anything to do with match fixing.

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The concerns over the company Manly some players were keeping resulted in a drastic shift in dressing room access at the club this year.

There is no access to the dressing room on match day unless you are on an official pre-approved list. Boxer Kali Meehan guards the players’ locker room during games.

The Sea Eagles have lashed out at allegations two of their matches from last year were fixed.

High stakes gambling — on sports other than rugby league Subs: do not remove — has been rife within the ranks of Sea Eagles players in recent years.

One player was spotted wagering $14,000 on a horse race at Hotel Steyn in Manly recently while a former NRL player has told of watching a Manly player bet $10,000 and $15,000 at a time on various racing meets.

Former Manly player Glenn Stewart, who played for South Sydney in their round 16 clash against his former club which is one of two games under investigation by police, also had his betting patterns questioned last year.

KENT: NRL can’t afford to gamble anymore

HINDS: Why we shouldn’t be surprised

WILSON: This is the NRL’s worst nightmare

It was reported that Stewart placed bets of up to $8000 on credit at the TAB in Forestville last year.

The Daily Telegraph revealed there had been a $75,000 betting splurge on a TAB account belonging to Foran last month. In an online frenzy the account was making bets of up to $15,000 on the greyhounds in Dapto, Albion Park and Sandown.

It then switched to the South African gallops an attempt to win back some of the thousands lost.

Manly — via a statement — said they were “bitterly disappointed” that the club’s reputation had been “unfairly tarnished”.

“The Sea Eagles fully support the strong stance by NRL CEO Todd Greenberg that any player found guilty of match fixing be banned for life,” the statement read.

“We will continue to support our players one hundred per cent and give them the presumption of innocence particularly against unfair mainstream and social media innuendo.”

The Sea Eagles said they had not been contacted by the police or the NSW Organised Crime Squad regarding the match fixing allegations.

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« 2016-Jun-04, 05:45 AM Reply #15 »

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-04, 05:56 AM Reply #16 »
From another pesky Pay Wall:

PUNTER Eddie Hayson has denied any knowledge of NRL match-fixing.

“I’m not even worried about it,” he told The Saturday Telegraph in his first interview, “Seriously I’m not.”

The comments from the former owner of the Stiletto brothel came a day after his name surfaced in reports up to six NRL players were allegedly involved in match-fixing in relation to two of the Manly Sea Eagles’ losses in 2015.

“People can say all they want but this is the figment of someone’s imagination,” he said.

“It’s a bloke who wears a rug, we all call him Wiggy. I know he started all this. He’s been making stuff up for six months. The same bloke who said I was kidnapped and put in the boot of a car.

“Wiggy has been conspiring with people to get this fiction story into the newspapers.

 
“He’s never let the truth get in the way of a good story.”

Hayson would not name the person he refers to as Wiggy.


Eddie Hayson has denied any knowledge of NRL match-fixing.
“The article alleging my involvement stated that the betting agencies who were contacted for the story reported no suspicious activity on the games,” Hayson said.

“This is all about a man and his increasingly desperate lies.

“We all know when there’s a sting the bookies are the first to blow up, complain and demand an immediate investigation. We are now nearly a year on. And they haven’t said a thing.

“They can keep investigating and I’ll be taking defamation action when my name is cleared.”

Hayson says he has not been interviewed by the police who are reportedly investigating the match-fixing allegations.


The two 2015 matches linked to the allegations are Manly’s 20-8 loss to Souths in round 16 and the same team’s 20-16 loss to Parramatta in round 24.

Hayson says he did not have a bet in the Manly-Parramatta game last year but may have had $100,000 on the other game in question, Manly v South Sydney.

“I can’t recall exactly what I did on that game,” he said.

“I have a lot of bets on sport every weekend.”

As for his friendship with NRL players, Hayson confirms he has known former Manly and now Parramatta Eels star Kieran Foran for more than a decade.


Hayson says reports he met with Kieran Foran at the Manly team hotel are ‘rubbish’.
He confirms he visited Foran in Brisbane two weeks ago.

“No one had been to Brisbane to see him in almost two weeks so I went up to make sure he was OK,” Hayson said.

“The reports that we met at the Manly team hotel are absolute rubbish.”

In response to the rumours he recently placed bets on Foran’s TAB account, Hayson said it had nothing to do with him and Foran should have the chance to speak for himself when he is ready.

“But I believe the amounts have been exaggerated to sell a story.” Hayson said.

“He (Foran) apparently transferred $8000 and got two very good tips from a form guru.

“He turned the $8000 into $48,000 and TAB froze the account which is standard practice when you have a good win. A week later the account was reactivated and the winnings were lost. “Somehow $8000 has been blown out of proportion and represented as Foran losing amounts of $75,000.” Hayson states.

Hayson categorically denied he placed any money on the Parramatta-Manly game, and “that includes commission agents, friends or anyone on my behalf”.

In relation to the Manly-Souths game, Hayson insists he can’t accurately recall if a bet was placed and said he is checking his records to be certain: “Regardless of whether or not a bet of $100,000
to profit $90k was placed, the allegations are incoherent and frankly laughable when allegedly players were paid $300k.”

“Players are too professional and too proud of their code and clubs to even think about match fixing.”


Offline Devil

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« 2016-Jun-04, 10:40 AM Reply #17 »
Always been a bit of corruption re first try scorer ,but does that hurt?


Sent from my iPad using Racehorse Talk

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2016-Jun-04, 10:43 AM Reply #18 »
Always been a bit of corruption re first try scorer ,but does that hurt?

It does if you are not in the know   :biggrin:

Offline jacksdream

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:13 AM Reply #19 »
If you lay down with dogs, you are bound to get fleas

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:16 AM Reply #20 »
You cannot make this stuff up!

Hayson in Nikolic in business together with a company.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/key-man-in-alleged-fix-linked-to-jockey/news-story/5b97702d0e4d1285df7ea4f604334418
« Last Edit: 2016-Jun-04, 11:35 AM by jfc »

Offline Jeunes

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:46 AM Reply #21 »
You cannot make this stuff up!

Hayson in Nikolic in business together with a company.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/key-man-in-alleged-fix-linked-to-jockey/news-story/5b97702d0e4d1285df7ea4f604334418

Mate, can you copy the story as unable to access it without subscribing.

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:49 AM Reply #22 »
Mate, can you copy the story as unable to access it without subscribing.
The buggers paywalled me right after I posted.

So, can't help.


So I need to think of another way.
« Last Edit: 2016-Jun-04, 11:56 AM by jfc »

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:54 AM Reply #23 »
Key man’ in alleged fix linked to jockey

THE AUSTRALIAN12:00AM JUNE 4, 2016

Ben Butler

Business reporter
Melbourne

Chip Le Grand

Victorian Chief Reporter
Melbourne
https://plus.google.com/114716225644912860323


Former Sydney brothel owner Eddie Hayson.
The big-game punter at the ­centre of an NRL match-fixing scandal, former Sydney brothel owner Eddie Hayson, is in business with Danny Nikolic, a jockey who court documents show is involved in a police investigation into “very serious crimes’’.

Company records show Mr Hayson and Nikolic own and control a company named EPKH, which they set up last October.

Both listed their address at the same apartment overlooking Sydney’s Manly beach, although Nikolic is understood to live in Melbourne.

Mr Hayson, who could not be reached last night, is reportedly the key figure in an elaborate betting sting in which up to half a dozen NRL players allegedly were paid $50,000 each to throw two matches invol­ving the Manly Sea Eagles last year.

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NSW police are examining claims that Mr Hayson, who is banned from betting at the TAB, instructed an associate to place a series of five-figure bets on the Sea Eagles’ mid-season match against South Sydney.

It is not suggested Nikolic placed the bets.

The head of the NSW Organised Crime Squad, Detective Inspector Wayne Walpole, said rumours of a betting scandal had been rampant before confirmation this week that detectives were assessing the claims.

He said the strength of the ­allegations was yet to be tested by police.

“It was the worst-kept secret in rugby league and all we did was confirm the job we’re supposed to be doing,’’ Mr Walpole told The Weekend Australian.

“These allegations have come to the notice of authorities and we’re assessing it. It is not the ­Organised Crime Squad pointing the finger or talking about the darkest day in sport.

“We’re the ones who haven’t made a big deal out of it. We didn’t want it in the media. Every reporter was ringing me — you would go into the pub and people were talking about it. It got to the point where you wouldn’t have credibility if you didn’t acknowledge you knew about it.’’

Mr Hayson is a prominent gambling identity renowned for ­cultivating close relationships with athletes and owing large debts to bookmakers. He befriended NRL star Andrew Johns, who last year worked as an assistant coach at Manly, and has an ­association with Parramatta player Kieran Foran.

“Eddie Hayson is a huge gambler and not a very good one who hangs around rugby league players and jockeys,’’ says Gerard Daffy, a bookmaker with Ubet.

“If he did pull something, he has that many bets the money would have been gone by midday the next day.’’

Mr Hayson’s latest choice in business partners, Nikolic, was banned from every racetrack in Victoria last October by Victoria Police Deputy Commissoner Shane Patton. Among the reasons cited were Nikolic’s alleged “lack of integrity, criminal associations and poor character”.

The ban followed a three-year suspension from riding imposed by racing authorities for threatening chief steward Terry Bailey.

Under the police ban, Nikolic is automatically barred from placing a bet on horseracing, but that ban does not automatically extend to bets on other sports or events.

Mr Hayson was warned off racecourses three years ago by Racing NSW after an investi­gation into an unrelated betting scandal.

Limited details of the Victoria Police investigation surrounding Nikolic are revealed in a Victorian Supreme Court lawsuit filed by the jockey. In an affidavit sworn on March 9 and filed with the court, Deputy Commissioner Patton said he relied in part on two folders of confidential information to make his decision.

He said a request by Nikolic for access to the confidential folders should be denied because it ­“included confidential material relating to ongoing criminal investigations of very serious crimes”.

“Release of the protecting information relating to current investigations would place those investigations at risk,” he said.

Company documents show Nikolic and Mr Hayson set up EPKH on October 14, three days before Deputy Commissioner Patton banned the jockey.

A Victoria Police spokesman declined to comment because the case is still before the courts.

Nikolic did not return calls from The Weekend Australian.

Reports of a betting plunge on last year’s round 16 match between Manly and South Sydney and a round 24 match between the Seas Eagles and Parramatta have drawn a sceptical response from Tabcorp and Australia’s licensed corporate bookmakers, who say that there is no evidence of suspicious betting on either of the two games.

A closer examination of the betting markets, particularly those offered by Pinnacle Sports, a sports betting company licenced in the Caribbean island of Curacoa that operates beyond the reach of Australian law and betting regulations, reveals a significant shifting of the odds in one of the matches.

Two days before South Sydney were due to play Manly, Pinnacle offered an opening price of $1.93 for anyone willing to bet that the Rabbitohs would win by eight points or more. By the time the teams ran on to the field, the odds had shortened to $1.74.

“That would take well over $50,000 for them to do that,’’ said a professional punter who pays close attention to NRL betting markets.

“I’m not saying it stinks but it shows some money.’’

In response to the flow of money for Souths to win comfortably, Pinnacle opened a new market, the day before the match, offering nine-point spread.

Again, the bookmaker was forced to shorten its price, from $1.97 to $1.88, by kick-off time.

The story from the Paramatta game is less clear. Tabcorp’s starting head-to-head price was a generous $6.25 for Paramatta to win and $1.36 for the Sea Eagles.

On the trading desks at Pinnacle and Australia’s licensed corporate bookmakers Bet 365 and Unibet, there was almost no movement in these odds in the five days from when the first market opened to the match started.

If the fix was in, it appears that no one took advantage of it to bet against Manly.

Additional reporting: Brent Read


Offline Antitab#

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« 2016-Jun-04, 11:56 AM Reply #24 »
I am calling bullshit on these so called rorts.

All the people that should have layed the winners didnt.  Its all made up.


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