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Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-04, 12:55 PM Reply #25 »
Surely you've made it into the mainstream of colourful celebrities when you attract the attention of the Sydneysider Spiderman formerly from The Sound of Music kids?

First Cunneen. Now Eddie.

https://twitter.com/nicholasham1/status/738921003305164804

As to identity of Wiggy, perhaps Eddie is employing the Small Penis Strategy?




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« 2016-Jun-04, 03:15 PM Reply #26 »
I laugh my head off when I see Rugby League people calling for Ray Murrihy to look into match fixing. He would not have a  :censored: ing clue. He was useless as a racing steward. He could not read a dead ride how would he read dead game of NRL ?

NRL match-fixing scandal: League needs Ray Murrihy to help clean up the game, says Penrith Panthers boss

Adrian Proszenko and Brad Walter 
Published: June 4, 2016 - 2:56PM

Panthers Group chief executive Brian Fletcher has implored the NRL to find a role for Ray Murrihy, believing racing's outgoing chief steward is the man to get to the bottom of the match-fixing scandal.

Fletcher has had a long association with Murrihy during his 26 years as chief executive of the Hawkesbury Racing Club, which ended when he took on the Panthers role. Murrihy himself has also exited the racing game, retiring after overseeing integrity issues on NSW tracks for the past 21 years.

Murrihy is no stranger to the NRL, having been engaged to assist the governing body's probe into betting irregularities during the infamous Cowboys-Bulldogs match in 2010 that resulted in Canterbury forward Ryan Tandy being convicted of match fixing. Murrihy, who retired on Friday after 46 years as a steward, was also a consultant during the Storm salary cap scandal.

"The expert in the game of detecting irregularities in the sporting world is Ray Murrihy," Fletcher said.

"With him retiring, it could be a great time for the NRL to employ one of the best. He could track gambling trends, what the players are up to and so forth.

"Give him a role in the integrity department and use his expertise, that would be proactive."

Murrihy, described by Racing NSW chief executive Peter V'landys as the "Black Caviar of stewards", wouldn't rule out working for other sporting bodies.

"I have had a good innings in racing and leave without any regrets," Murrihy said.

"If something came up in the future, so be it, but I did some work which was enjoyable for the NRL a few years on the Storm and the spoon and the Bulldogs and North Queensland.

"I know no more of this situation other than what I have read."

The NRL will be under pressure to devote more resources to integrity issues after renewing its agreement with Sportsbet until the end of 2020. The deal is worth $60 million in exchange for the right for the online betting company to become the code's official wagering partner and have first rights to advertise with rugby league's official betting partners. The NRL had been without a wagering partner for a period because of the severe backlash to the saturation coverage of Tom Waterhouse.

The NRL has a range of educational programs to educate players about the perils of betting. In the case of Tandy, the fix occurred just five weeks after Bulldogs players attended a compulsory session on the dangers of gambling.

NRL chief executive Todd Greenberg has made it clear anyone found to be involved in match fixing will be banned for life.

"It all gets back to the person," Fletcher said.

"You know the rules, the rules state what can and can't be done, so if you break the rules you're in trouble. You can't go and watch what everyone does all the time, that's impractical.

"You can always get your mate down the road to put a bet on. If he goes to the TAB and gets on, what happens there?

"It's like everything else, if you do get caught, the bigger the penalty, the bigger the deterrent. You look at John McEnroe and he was fined about $3000 for swearing – if they had fined him $30,000 the first time it probably wouldn't have happened again.

"If the rules are clear and you get life [for match fixing], that will be a big deterrent."


Offline Jeunes

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« 2016-Jun-04, 03:45 PM Reply #27 »
The buggers paywalled me right after I posted.

So, can't help.


So I need to think of another way.

Thanks mate.

Unless concrete proof is going to surface over the next few weeks, there are going to be a few angry people that this has spread over the news.

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2016-Jun-04, 04:40 PM Reply #28 »
I am calling bullshit on these so called rorts.

All the people that should have layed the winners didnt.  Its all made up.

There is something not quite right......

Is this PR for someone's upcoming book or something?

"The head of the NSW Organised Crime Squad, Detective Inspector Wayne Walpole, said rumours of a betting scandal had been rampant before confirmation this week that detectives were assessing the claims."

What rampant rumours  :what:

Offline fours

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« 2016-Jun-04, 04:49 PM Reply #29 »
Hmmmm,

One of the Stewarts leaving seemed odd at the time.... and when something does not ring true there is often an uknown reason why things happen..

Fours

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« 2016-Jun-04, 05:17 PM Reply #30 »

NRL match-fixing scandal: Former integrity unit boss Jim Doyle calls for team list overhaul

Adrian Proszenko 
Published: June 4, 2016 - 4:49PM

New Zealand Warriors chief Jim Doyle has urged the NRL to revisit its protocols around team announcements, believing the risk of inside information being passed on for gambling purposes could be limited by overhauling the  system.

Doyle was in charge of the NRL's integrity unit during his stint as the chief operating officer at Rugby League Central and oversaw a raft of new measures to protect the game's integrity. They included the limiting of the exotic markets that betting agencies were allowed to offer and an expansion of the game's registration scheme, which meant club directors and staffers were bound by the same code of conduct – and the same sanctions for breaking it – as the players.

The former New Zealand Rugby League boss was close to implementing another fundamental integrity change before taking the Warriors job. Doyle had proposed that the naming of football teams be delayed, initially by  a day, as part of a strategy to ensure the team that runs onto the park is the same as that named earlier in the week. The initiative was put forward following concerns that information about team changes was being passed on to individuals to gain a betting advantage, a valuable commodity in the punting arena.

The NRL was poised to shift the naming of teams from Tuesday to Wednesday for the 2015 season, but the plan was aborted when Doyle took the Warriors job midway through 2014. It is understood one of the reasons for aborting the proposal was concerns the official match-day program, in Big League magazine, would be  affected.

Doyle believes the league should reconsider the initiative and look to stagger the naming of teams, with a view to the side being named being the one that actually runs onto the  arena.

"It's important from an integrity point of view not to put the code at risk where people can find out information and place bets," Doyle said.

"It's also important to the fans and members that when they look at the team [announced] they can watch that team and their favourite players play. You don't want to get there and then the team is changed.

"It's important to try to find a solution so that when you name your team, you name the team you anticipate to take the field unless there are special circumstances. That's pretty tough to do on a Tuesday."

As it stands, the NRL requires clubs to name their sides by 5pm on Tuesday, although there is no obligation for the players named to take their place. Coaches often attempt to keep key line-up changes a closely guarded secret, believing it gives them a competitive advantage.

There are no penalties for playing a vastly different team to that named, allowing coaches to shuffle line-ups, give injured players every chance to prove their fitness or blood rookies without the pressure of added scrutiny.

However, this heightens the risk of players and officials being tempted to provide information to underworld figures and provides a disadvantage to rank-and-file punters.

Doyle suggested staggering team announcements closer to the actual game times and sanctioning teams for changing their line-ups without a legitimate excuse.

"With the current schedule you have games on Thursday night, Friday night, Saturday night, Sunday night, Monday night – so you might not do it the same for every team," Doyle explained.

"If you've got a game on a Thursday night, the team can't be named on a Thursday.

"But if you've got a team playing on a Sunday or Monday night, why name the team on a Tuesday? I don't know if you need to name them all at the same time, surely there needs to be some delay.

"If you're playing on a Thursday night, you probably would still have to name your team on a Tuesday. But if it's Friday night, maybe it should be Wednesday. If Saturday, then maybe Thursday. If Sunday, then Friday.

"Unfortunately those weekly publications wouldn't have all the teams in it, but you can't run the game based on a weekly publication.

"And you would have to provide a 'please explain' around the circumstances that happened for you to require a change."


Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-04, 05:31 PM Reply #31 »

Offline Gintara

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« 2016-Jun-04, 06:04 PM Reply #32 »


What rampant rumours  :what:

These have been swirling around for months PP, I gave it little credence thinking it was more urban myth than anything but now it has hit the media  :shrug:

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« 2016-Jun-04, 06:18 PM Reply #33 »

Online jfc

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Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2016-Jun-05, 09:35 AM Reply #35 »
These have been swirling around for months PP, I gave it little credence thinking it was more urban myth than anything but now it has hit the media  :shrug:

I've got to get out more  :shy:

Online wily ole dog

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« 2016-Jun-05, 11:22 AM Reply #36 »
It's been funny watching the footy show handle this issue this morning.
Everybody has been asked their opinion except Mr A. Johns  who sat there squirming in his seat  :lol:

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-06, 05:41 AM Reply #37 »
Immortal reveals all.

NRL match fixing: Andrew Johns denies playing part in gambling and partying culture at Manly
June 5, 2016 11:00pm

EXCLUSIVE Rebecca Wilson and Michael Carayannis

FURIOUS rugby league Immortal Andrew Johns has denied he played a part in introducing a culture of gambling and partying to the Manly Sea Eagles.

Johns — who is a friend of controversial punter and former brothel owner Eddie Hayson — told The Daily Telegraph the claims are “ridiculous” and “ludicrous”.

The denial comes as the NSW Organised Crime Squad investigates match fixing allegations involving two games featuring Manly in 2015.


Manly insiders claim the trouble started at Brookvale when Johns was appointed as an assistant and halves consultant in 2012 under then-coach Geoff Toovey.

After Johns’ arrival, Hayson and porn shop king Con Ange attended matches and became socially involved with many of the players, including Anthony Watmough, Kieran Foran and the Stewart brothers, Brett and Glenn.

There is no suggestion those players were involved in any match fixing and Johns rejected suggestions he was the key link between Hayson and the club.

“I didn’t even go to games socially because I was working at the football for Channel 9,” Johns said. “I knew Eddie from my time at Newcastle but I didn’t attend any games with him or involve him in the Manly club.”

Johns stopped working at the club after last season when new coach Trent Barrett took over.

Senior Sea Eagles staff, who asked not to be named, say the Hayson-Johns friendship continued at Manly.

Team insiders claim Johns introduced several team members to his friend, and at least two members of the Manly squad enjoyed late-night trysts at Hayson’s multi-million dollar brothel, Stiletto.

The Telegraph does not suggest it was any player named in this story.



Johns’ previous partying and gambling sprees were well-known in league circles and allegedly involved Hayson.

Johns admitted in 2007 to regularly taking ecstasy during his brilliant playing career after being caught in possession of the drug in London.

His friendship with Hayson, which once involved racing six horses in partnership with the then brothel owner, was intense.

Johns was embroiled in a major betting scandal involving Hayson when he was still playing at Newcastle in 2006. A huge plunge on the Knights losing a match took place when the superstar halfback withdrew from the game. The announcement that he was out of the team was not revealed publicly until after the bets were placed.


Hayson reportedly won up to $1 million on the game but he only admitted to having a small wager on the outcome after reading about the injury in a newspaper.

“I injured my neck the week before in Auckland, which Eddie knew about,” Johns said. “But he didn’t win a huge amount — just a small bet.”

A subsequent NRL investigation concluded that nothing untoward had taken place.

Johns and Hayson were also embroiled in the More Joyous racing affair in 2013. Johns fronted a stewards’ inquiry after it was revealed he had told Hayson the racehorse was “off’’.

Johns had allegedly received the tip from trainer Gai Waterhouse’s son Tom, who was a Channel 9 advertiser. Tom Waterhouse and Johns were cleared of wrongdoing but Hayson was banned from racetracks for six months

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/nrl/nrl-match-fixing-andrew-johns-denies-playing-part-in-gambling-and-partying-culture-at-manly/news-story/af84e7c15f102579028c23bf2fc138e9


Offline el zoro

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« 2016-Jun-06, 09:25 AM Reply #38 »
I guess we will see how good the NSW Police are at doing an investigation.

The simple thing to remember is wherever there is money to be made there will be corruption.
Whether it be in the Business world, Governments or in the Sports arena. 

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2016-Jun-06, 09:42 AM Reply #39 »

The simple thing to remember is wherever there is money to be made there will be corruption.
Whether it be in the Business world, Governments or in the Sports arena.

...or media organizations like the one reporting the story.

That newspaper as a well known credibility problem. This is what happens when you pay people for information. They tend to tell you what you want to hear.

One of the authors of that story should be investigated by the police on how she got hold of people's medical records (blood test results) in the ASADA case. That is illegal. Especially when the history of the company suggests there is a high probability that they paid for that information.

No credibility means this story is probably embellished  :yes:

Offline el zoro

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« 2016-Jun-06, 11:24 AM Reply #40 »
Nothing new in Media exaggerating the truth. Sells more papers or these days maybe gets more clicks online.

Offline chuggers

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« 2016-Jun-06, 07:53 PM Reply #41 »
Nothing new in Media exaggerating the truth. Sells more papers or these days maybe gets more clicks online.

I can help you with the truth  Elzoro....it is there in the posts...trust me...

 :beer:

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-07, 05:07 AM Reply #42 »
Eddie Hayson doesn’t live here anymo unit owner’s note

THE AUSTRALIAN
12:00AM JUNE 7, 2016

Chip Le Grand

Victorian Chief Reporter
Melbourne


Hayson, a brothel owner and big-money punter allegedly at the centre of an elaborate bookie swindle involving half a dozen crooked footballers, $500,000 in bets and two fixed Manly games from last season, packed his things and left the apartment without complaint. The residence is well appointed and beautifully located; the view from the balcony takes in a full sweep of Manly Beach. But, like any gambler, Hayson knew when to walk and when to run.

“I haven’t heard of him since the day he handed over the keys,’’ the owner said. “You and 100 other people are looking for him.’’

The trouble is, people kept coming for Hayson well after he moved to another, unknown ­address. After the owners moved into the apartment, they became increasingly concerned at the “unsavoury’’ ­people who ­appeared to be looking for the previous resident.
Eddie Hayson didn’t answer the knock on the door.

Before the rumours — thus far unsubstantiated — of Hayson’s involvement in fixing two NRL matches were first reported, his tenancy at a beachside apartment came to a shattering end.

Late one night last October, someone slipped past the external security door to the Manly apartment complex armed with a ball-peen hammer and a spray can.


The next morning, neighbours woke to find the hammer lodged in a window and an unambiguous message painted on Hayson’s front door: PAY.

“We had him evicted at that point,’’ the apartment owner told The Australian. “There was no way that was working for us.’’

The unwelcome intrusion came shortly after Hayson established a new business with banned jockey Danny Nikolic. The company, EKPH Pty Ltd, was registered at the same Manly address.

“When we moved in, we had people snooping around (and) in the yard late at night,’’ the owner said. “I was washing the front windows one day and a dark car parked the wrong way on the street. The guy just sat there looking at me. I went to the front fence and yelled: ‘Eddie does not live here, he has gone.’ The guy just waved and moved on. It was very unsettling.

“We eventually put a large sign on the front window saying ‘Eddie Hayson doesn’t live here anymore, he has moved.’ We don’t want people thinking he lives here. He doesn’t. He is not anywhere near here now.’’

Hayson denies knowledge or involvement in a plan to fix NRL matches.

The NSW Organised Crime Squad is examining allegations.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/nrl/eddie-hayson-doesnt-live-here-anymore-unit-owners-note/news-story/ea6eed12265fd2e385fd3f05ab659c4b

Offline Devil

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« 2016-Jun-07, 10:32 AM Reply #43 »
If it wasn't so serious it would be funny


Sent from my iPad using Racehorse Talk


Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-07, 06:35 PM Reply #45 »
This is not going away.

After watching Ross Greenwood on 9 opine, it seems that the parent company FAL carries considerable clout.

Manchester City is as big as it gets.

But Eddie seems to have no dead man's brake when it comes to ruffling feathers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavour_and_Life

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2016-Jun-07, 09:00 PM Reply #46 »
This is not going away.

After watching Ross Greenwood on 9 opine, it seems that the parent company FAL carries considerable clout.

Manchester City is as big as it gets.

But Eddie seems to have no dead man's brake when it comes to ruffling feathers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavour_and_Life

Those Viv Richards ads on the radio are so dreadful they are funny.

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-08, 04:13 PM Reply #47 »
A woeful effort from Adam Vaughan.

There are serious matters that must be investigated by the police and the code.

Trying to downplay the continuing saga is an attempt to help the perps skulk off away from justice.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/3951204/nrl-match-fixing/?cs=5141

Online jfc

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« 2016-Jun-09, 06:06 AM Reply #48 »
Not sure why this bombshell took so long to surface after its published date, but it is perplexing and disturbing.

Surely it is the pinnacle of insanity for any betting outfit to have Fletcher as a shareholder?

The mind boggles about the effectiveness of the police investigation given how many irons in the fire Fletcher has or had with that organisation.

http://www.smh.com.au/rugby-league/league-news/nrl-punters-using-overseas-bookmakers-to-avoid-detection-of-massive-bets-20160607-gpdqj6.html

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« 2016-Jun-09, 07:42 AM Reply #49 »
Fascinating development.

But what happened to Wiggy?

Will Danny use Eddie as a character reference?


I kicked myself for not having a bet. I never had $1: NRL ‘fixer’

THE AUSTRALIAN12:00AM JUNE 9, 2016

Chip Le Grand

Victorian Chief Reporter

Eddie Hayson has a simple question for anyone accusing him of fixing two NRL matches last ­season: “Where is the money?’’

The Manly match-fixing story is an irresistible tale of a big-­punting former brothel owner, a banned jockey, a porn king, a roll call of star footballers, claims of $50,000 bribes, a $500,000 betting plunge and a team that tanked, not once but twice, in a scurrilous sporting conspiracy.

As one gambling insider put it, “when you consider the charact­ers involved it would make a great movie, let alone a story’’.

It is also, as things stand, a betting scandal without a bet.

“I haven’t had a dollar,’’ Hay­son told The Australian in a series of interviews. “Not a dollar. No one on my behalf, no friend next door, not a single dollar on either game. It is very troubling.’’

Hayson confirmed that the jockey embroiled in the scandal is Danny Nikolic, currently banned from all Victorian racetracks by Victoria Police.

Hayson told The Australian that he transferred $100,000 to Nikolic last year to bet on an NRL match on his behalf. He said ­Nikolic added $20,000 of his own to the wager.

Hayson has since checked with Nikolic and is adamant the money was not gambled on either of the two matches under scrutiny.

His claims are consistent with the absence of suspicious betting detected by Tabcorp, Australia’s licensed bookmakers, and the lack of a dramatic movement in the odds offered by Pinnacle, the most likely offshore operator to take large bets.

This has left NSW Organised Crime Squad detectives examining match-fixing claims with a novel predicament: how to substantiate a fix without evidence that a plunge took place.

The untold story, according to Hayson, is how rumours of an NRL fix first emerged.

The two 2015 matches under scrutiny are Manly’s round 16 loss to South Sydney and round 24 loss to Parramatta.

Hayson said the first he learned of a supposed fix was after the Parramatta game, when a bikie known as Tony T rang him to complain about being cheated out of his money.

He said he subsequently learned that Tony T had been ripped off not by an elaborate match-fixing sting, but by members of his own outlaw motorcycle club. Club figures, having decided they wanted Tony T out of their chapter, told him of a fictitious fix involving NRL matches.

They convinced him to give them his money, with the promise that they’d wager it on a sure thing. To embellish the story, they told Tony T that Eddie Hayson, a well-known Sydney gambling identity and former brothel owner known to associate with high-­profile rugby league players, had arranged the fix.

Only there was no fix and no bets were laid. “They took his money, saying they’d put it on,’’ Hayson said. “He never saw it again. It was a rort to take his money.’’

Hayson said the bogus story was subsequently fed by Tony T to police in a bid to avoid going to jail for other, unrelated offences. From there, rumours started building of a sporting scandal.

Momentum became unstoppable once it leaked that police had warned Manly players to stop socialising with Hayson and adult film producer Con Ange, a dressing-room hanger-on at several NRL clubs. Hayson suspects Ange helped spread the story among Sydney journalists.

Hayson has not told his ­account to police. He is still waiting to be interviewed. In the meantime, the scandal has taken on a life of its own, with a commercial partner of Manly this week pulling a $1 million sponsorship deal in response to the corruption allegations.

Although police have not named Manly players in connect­ion to the match-fixing alleg­a­tions, those with known assoc­ia­tions with Hayson have been identified in media reports. One of them is Glenn Stewart, who played for the winning Souths team in the round 16 match.

Hayson is incredulous: “They are saying Glenn Stewart got paid for winning the game at Souths? Who the f..k gets paid for winning?’’ He is also furious at reports that Andrew Johns, a former NRL star who worked with Manly last year as an assistant coach, was ­responsible for introducing him to the current players.

He said he has known Kieran Foran, a Sea Eagle last season, since he was a teenager and was introduced to the Stewart brothers, Brett and Glenn, seven or eight years ago through one of their managers.

Hayson’s association with Niko­lic dates back more than 10 years to a race at Flemington, when the jockey rode Gonski, a horse owned by Hayson, to ­victory in the Concept Stakes.

More recently, Hayson and Niko­lic registered a business called EKPH, named after Hayson’s initials. Hayson said the company was formed as part of a finance deal and has never traded.

More recently, Hayson and Niko­lic registered a business called EKPH, named after Hayson’s initials. Hayson said the company was formed as part of a finance deal and has never traded.

In court documents lodged by Victoria Police justifying the ban against Nikolic, the jockey is ­described as having a “lack of ­integrity, criminal associations and poor character’’.

The ban, which began last Octo­ber shortly before Nikolic registered the business with Hay­son, followed a three-year suspension from riding imposed by racing authorities after Nikolic was found to have threatened chief steward Terry Bailey.

Hayson insisted there was still good in Nikolic, who declined to return calls from The Australian. Under the terms of his ban, Niko­lic cannot bet on racing but he can bet on other sports. Hayson said that, like most punters, he bet with the TAB and most of the corporate bookmakers.

He said the challenge for big-money punters was convincing ­increasingly risk-averse licensed bookmakers to take their bets.

Hayson has held accounts with Sportsbet, a company that recent­ly signed a $60 million advertising deal to remain the official wagering partner of the NRL, Crownbet, Ladbrokes, William Hill and the betting exchange Betfair.

He also bet in cash at TAB ­retail outlets. He said he has never placed a bet with Pinnacle, the largest of the offshore sports ­betting agencies.

In recent months, Hayson has been banned by the TAB.

He doesn’t currently bet with Sportsbet and usually employs third parties, known in the industry as “bowlers’’, to place bets with other bookies on his behalf. He also bets through commission agents, who are able to place bets with the corporate bookmakers, in return for a fee.

In Hayson’s world, $100,000 isn’t large bet. “If there was a rort on, I would be trying to put $4m on, not $100,000. Don’t insult me.’’ He said hasn’t bet big on NRL matches over the past two seasons and prefers to punt on the AFL.

His only regret about the two NRL matches under scrutiny is not backing Parramatta in the Eels’ now infamous upset of the Sea Eagles.

“I remember sitting in bed watching the game at home. I said: ‘Look how wet it is here. This is a joke. I wish I was on Parramatta.’

“I kicked myself for not having a bet. I never had one dollar.’’

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/i-kicked-myself-for-not-having-a-bet-i-never-had-1-nrl-fixer/news-story/791c9375a9626d11e8910ee8861e7e68



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