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Author Topic: NRL - In General  (Read 7673 times)

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Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Apr-05, 03:08 PM Reply #25 »
You could say Gus Gould stepped down at the Roosters

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Apr-05, 05:10 PM Reply #26 »
Seems Mitchell Moses wants to go to Parramatta straight away.

Online wily ole dog

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« 2017-Apr-05, 05:27 PM Reply #27 »
Send him packing. Idiotic move by Parra if true

Offline arakaan

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« 2017-Apr-05, 06:16 PM Reply #28 »
I hope they keep him and put him in Intrust cup for the rest of the year.

If any of the figures are close to the mark then

1) tigers were stupid to offer
2) he is stupid to not take it
3) Hope benny goes with him  :bleh:

The only one I will be crushed to lose is Teddy. And I think he is gone.
« Last Edit: 2017-Apr-05, 06:19 PM by arakaan »

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Apr-05, 10:17 PM Reply #29 »
Send him packing. Idiotic move by Parra if true

On the flip side though Wily (Cronk excluded) who else is available?

If they haven't got a junior they believe maybe ready within the next 3 to 5 years then the only option is try to sign one. Moses is still 22.

Halves / playmakers aren't like wingers, you shake a tree and another one of them drops out but a decent playmaker is pretty rare and unless you have two these days, you're stuffed.


Online wily ole dog

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« 2017-Apr-06, 03:05 PM Reply #30 »
Gin
Nothing wrong with what the eels have in the halves at the moment

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Apr-06, 10:00 PM Reply #31 »
Disagree Wily, The Eels are pretty one dimensional, shut down Norman and nothing else is happening. Gutherson is a long way from being dangerous as a 6.


Online wily ole dog

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« 2017-Apr-07, 03:20 PM Reply #32 »
so is moses

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-Apr-07, 10:49 PM Reply #33 »
Did they sign Moses before Cronk went on the market?

I know who'd I'd sign up out of the two.

Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2017-Apr-08, 08:30 AM Reply #34 »
Knowing your judgement of League that'd be Moses for sure.

Offline Gintara

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« 2017-Apr-08, 12:35 PM Reply #35 »
Did they sign Moses before Cronk went on the market?

I know who'd I'd sign up out of the two.

Of course you would PP.

Pretty sure that says where Cronk is headed --> retirement.


Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Apr-13, 12:26 PM Reply #36 »
Jack Bird off to Brisbane for the next 3 seasons.

The sooner the NRL brings in a 2nd Brisbane team and gets rid of 3rd party payments the better.

This is really disappointing. The salary cap is simply not working.


Online wily ole dog

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« 2017-Apr-13, 05:14 PM Reply #37 »
Dumb decision by the kid as well, from a football perspective

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-Apr-21, 12:41 PM Reply #38 »

The two really crazy things about rugby league in Australia right now

Steve Mascord 
Published: April 20, 2017 - 11:47AM

It's a blessing when you can view the familiar as if for the first time, your home as if a visitor, the normal as if it's exotic and strange.

Your correspondent has just written a book that is pretty much about auditing one's own hobbies, interests and obsessions and an unexpected by-product of thinking in this way is that since returning to Sydney for round two, I'd like to think I've looked at the NRL from an outsider's perspective.

The introduction of a 24-hour rugby league TV station just underlines how bizarre the competition has become – and although it's a boon for fans, perhaps it's made it more self-absorbed.

There are two really crazy things about rugby league in Australia right now.

The first is this: there are eight games every weekend and yet we are obsessed with who will be playing for who next year.

And when next year comes around, we won't be paying much attention to them actually playing for their new clubs – because we'll be talking about who'll be playing for who the following year!

What a prescient idea it was to title one of the increasing number of rugby league podcasts "Market Watch". The market sometimes seems to have more watchers than the actual games.

Because I don't have a favourite NRL club, I don't care who's joining who next year – and this speculation is the fuel that drives the engine of media coverage in 2017. Having reliable information in this area is increasingly like possessing gold dust, it's one of the few things in traditional media that gets the cash registers clinking.

The second barmy thing is State of Origin selection speculation.

You would not know there is a representative weekend a fortnight from now. You wouldn't know this is a World Cup year and that it will be in Australia. As soon as a ball was kicked in March, speculation on the make-up of the NSW and Queensland sides was rampant.

Once more we are looking over not one hill, but several. This column has already lamented the fact rugby league runs two competing competitions each year with the same players.

But it was once a good argument that Origin was more compelling than Tests because it was more competitive. But now? New Zealand seem more capable of winning series involving Australia than the Blues are of beating the Maroons. They've done so more often in the last nine years.

The biff is gone, the playing population is changing rapidly and the eligibility rules have been tightened up. Huge swathes of NRL players are ineligible for NSW and Queensland.

The fact that Origin is such a focus merely underlines how parochial, geographically limited and inward-looking rugby league in Australia remains as we head towards the third decade of this century.

One more thing. In the short time he has been out of first grade coaching Ivan Cleary says "more speculation" is the biggest thing that has changed.

It's true.

For most of my career, the aim in a news story was to have a quote in the third paragraph. That has changed for two major reasons: one, you can't just get a player on the phone when you feel like it anymore.

And two, a story with a quote is easy to "lift" by a rival. On the other hand, if you hang an unsourced story on a byline or a reporter's name, the reader or viewer has to keep coming to your website, station or channel.

Commercially, it is actually in a media outlet's interests not to quote people or confirm rumours because they lose control of their content as soon as they do.

The personal relationships between the media professionals and coaches, players and officials have eroded to such an extent that a reporter is far more willing to call for a coach to be sacked or a player to be dropped than before. He's got nothing to lose, the coach or player doesn't talk to him anyway.

Wayne Bennett has seen the process first-hand.

The rugby league media is being taken over by rights holders and the governing body itself, which will run its own website from next year.

Mainstream media is losing resources, relevance and access while television reporters, retired players and current stars sit around in the rarefied air of TV studio green rooms, where the old paradigm is recreated with the help of healthy appearance fees.

Podcast here

Book here


Offline Authorized

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« 2017-May-05, 09:41 AM Reply #39 »

NRL player Shaun Kenny-Dowall reportedly arrested for cocaine possession

Updated 5 minutes ago

Prominent NRL Roosters player Shaun Kenny-Dowall has been arrested for drug possession at a Sydney nightclub overnight, according to reports.

Police have confirmed a 29-year-old man was arrested after being found with a small plastic bag carrying almost half a gram of cocaine at a nightclub on George Street in Sydney's CBD.

Police said the man was issued with a court attendance notice for possessing a prohibited drug and is due to front court on June 21 at Sydney's Downing Centre.

The Sydney Roosters have been contacted for comment.


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-May-05, 11:02 AM Reply #40 »
How many people take Cocaine?

Can you start a survey up Auth?

I have by no means lived a sheltered existence, but have never seen anyone taking it and have never been offered it either by friends or any dodgy characters.

How bad a problem is cocaine usage by the "elite classes"? (as Mark Latham calls them).

I get the distinct feeling that half the people appearing on air as journalists, game show hosts, newsreaders, and now maybe even footballers, are taking the stuff. Either that or speed.

This comes on the back of the Tim Worner case (Channel 7 boss), who was alleged to be snorting the stuff while he was in the action of  :censored: ing his secrertary because it enhanced the experience (and who said decadence was dead  :nowink: )

SKD is unlucky he isn't employed by Channel 7. Those guys are allowed by the police to investigate their own allegations and come out with a report that says "It's all OK. Nothing found".

End of the line big boy. Sorry. You have been a loyal Rooster for so many years but you can't take that stuff pardner.

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-May-05, 11:08 AM Reply #41 »
The story doing the rounds is he fumbled it in front of the Police.

It is apparently the drug of choice because it does no linger in the system for long.

Wonder how bad the results would be if players where tested "randomly" on a Sunday morning ?

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-May-05, 11:15 AM Reply #42 »
The story doing the rounds is he fumbled it in front of the Police.

It is apparently the drug of choice because it does no linger in the system for long.

Wonder how bad the results would be if players where tested "randomly" on a Sunday morning ?

Yes. Rugby League players, on air media personalities, NRL print journalists (if you can get them on  a Sunday morning - they may be down at one of Eddy Hayson's brothel still).

Test them all.

Online arthur

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« 2017-May-05, 12:07 PM Reply #43 »
The story doing the rounds is he fumbled it in front of the Police.
/quote]

Not being all that familiar with RL . .

Would that be a knock-on, an own goal, or a behind kicked  :chin:

Offline Authorized

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« 2017-May-05, 07:28 PM Reply #44 »

The NRL is spending big and its wastefulness is failing the game, writes Paul Kent

IN the next few weeks Alan Wilson, the great unsung, will again pack his car with second hand football boots and hitch a trailer, filled with donated tackle bags and hit shields, to his towbar and he will drive into the bush to give them to junior clubs that cannot afford them.

The last time Wilson went bush he called former NRL player Ian McCann, now at Wentworthville, and McCann loaded him with old boots and training shirts, whatever surplus was around the club.

Wilson, supported by Leagues Clubs Australia, works through a good heart. He called Wests Ashfield chief executive Simon Cook and asked for a few bucks and Cook said just tell me what you need.

That is the heart-warmer here.

Elsewhere, we love a game that no longer knows what it is or what it wants, one that has lost a little soul.

Last year the NRL came up with what was a good idea; to offset rising insurance costs by finding one broker to insure the entire game under one discounted insurance policy.

The NRL called in the NSW and Queensland Rugby Leagues, the Country Rugby League, and asked if they were on-board.

They believed the idea was tremendous, though it is uncertain how much further the conversation advanced.

Soon after the NRL put out a tender and several consultants leapt for the deal. Nobody passes up free money.

Lion Partnership won the tender and what happens next is all too familiar in rugby league.

When Lion Partnership dropped the winner on the table, US-based global brokerage company Arthur J Gallagher and Co, the Country Rugby League looked and had a problem.

They were already in partnership with an insurance company and still had a year to go on the deal.

The metropolitan junior leagues realised that if the NRL could not sell the whole of game it was really selling nothing different from before and so they chose to stay with their insurers, too.

Shortly before Christmas the proposal — which Lion Partnership broker Peter Sellwood said was worth “a few thousand dollars’’ and the NRL said was “$30-40,000’’ — fell apart.

All that was left was the invoice from Lion Partnership. They did their job and the NRL was hit with a bill of about $700,000. Club officials and other bidders remain certain this was the amount.

The dumbness of it is that all this would have been avoided if somebody had simply asked the question — could they all sign up immediately? — when they originally met.

How much would that $700,000 have helped the work Wilson is doing in the country? Or the $750,000 for a ­stadium feasibility study that got thrown out by the State Government?

The money being spent at headquarters is extraordinary.

And nobody seems accountable.

There is nothing the NRL won’t spend its money on if somebody, usually hired by the NRL, tells them it is a good idea.

The game is currently budgeting $150 million on an in-house digital media platform. They have spoken to clubs about each contributing $180,000 a year for upkeep. This, on top of running their own websites.

This is an idea years behind its time.

Other major organisations like the AFL and the NFL overseas are scaling back their in-house digital platforms because the cost is prohibitive and it is cheaper to outsource.

Yet the NRL ignores the burden of Australia’s small population and the warnings of others and pushed forward.

Or do they just not know?

Do not even begin to dream what Alan Wilson could do with that money.

A $100 million has been budgeted on junior participation.

Crowds are down more than 25 per cent at some clubs over the past five years. This, in the season the NRL’s strategic plan of 2013 promised crowd averages of 20,000 a game.

Participation rates are down.

The QRL has dropped from 60,000 players last year to 54,000 this year, country registrations have dropped from 55,000 to 52,000 and Sydney kids have dropped from 39,000 to 34,000.

These numbers are worse than they appear. They are down on numbers from the year before, a game in slow death.

It is critical for the game not only now, but in years to come.

NSWRL research shows that if you played rugby league for at least three years as a junior you were seven times more likely to be an “avid supporter” of the game as an adult.

An avid supporter is a member, or buys a jersey, attends games.

Another study shows that for every dollar spent on junior participation it multiplies into millions over a lifetime.

Yet they are disappearing.

The NRL is at war with clubs at the moment, the lack of trust as bad as it has been since Super League.

The clubs don’t believe the NRL has any idea how to run its business and the NRL believes the clubs are frivolous with the money when they give it to them.

That war became public last November when the clubs walked out on the NRL after the League reneged on its salary cap promise.

The NRL argued it needs $100 million a year to urgently address junior participation.

The clubs argue back that the NRL has spent $100 million on junior participation in recent seasons and numbers continued to go down and they want to know what changes with the next $100 million.

There is no plan.

It is a business that does not know what it does not know.

So it buys insurance against criticism by hiring high-priced consultants to tell them solutions that fail to work but insulate them against blowback.

Meanwhile, a guy who knows very clearly what is needed and how it can be done loads his car with donated equipment and drives west.

He is the great unsung, working on shoestrings and hand-me-downs, and he worth more than the rest of them put together.


Offline Authorized

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« 2017-May-06, 10:25 AM Reply #45 »
Cokehead


Offline arakaan

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Offline Authorized

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« 2017-May-06, 12:27 PM Reply #47 »

Reports Two Players Allegedly Spotted Buying Cocaine After ANZAC Test

BREAKING

Reports two players allegedly spotted buying cocaine after anzac test

There are reports that a Canberra man has appeared in court after selling cocaine to two NRL players after the Australia v New Zealand ANZAC test.

According to abc.net.au that Kiwis captain Jesse Browmich and player Kevin Proctor joined a Canberra main in the city's centre, with police spotting the man on CCTV preparing a white substance on his phone before handing it to the two men.

The report says that the two men rolled up cash notes and consumed the substance.

The players were both named in court, but neither has been charged with an offence.

The Storm have been contacted for comment by abc.net.au.

More to follow.


Offline Gintara

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« 2017-May-06, 12:32 PM Reply #48 »
Rep round? Or anything goes round?  :chin:

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2017-May-06, 01:54 PM Reply #49 »
As I've been saying to anyone who will listen Coke usage among the elite classes is rife.

And here are these very same elite classes telling us bonus bets are evil FFS.

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