Everything for trainers. - Trainer - Racehorse TALK harm-plan harm-plan

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Everything for trainers. - Trainer - Racehorse TALK

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Online Peter Mair

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« 2019-Nov-11, 08:59 PM Reply #150 »


Pleas rub some Vicks on my nose ........ I am breathless at the nonsense

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Dec-19, 06:29 PM Reply #151 »
TCO2 Positive charge Peter Gelagotis over the 36 threshold but no detail as to how far over it was......the horse ran third.

https://www.racenet.com.au/news/peter-gelagotis-charged-by-victorian-stewards-after-investigation-20191218

Story also on Jenny Gow-Whyte  who records another positive cobalt this time she had been penalised previously by the RAD Board for Bute fined $650 and required to refund the prizemoney $12K.

 https://www.racingvictoria.com.au/integrity/rad-board/-/media/79587ce6f3db43fe94a937bf6f74d626.ashx

Stewards also on Wednesday issued charges against trainer Jenny Gow-Whyte following an investigation into the circumstances that led to the Ms Gow-Whyte trained, Soul Fire, returning a urine sample containing cobalt in excess of the permitted threshold of 100 micrograms per litre in urine.
The pre-race urine sample was taken from Soul Fire before finishing third in the Elephant & Castle Hotel Benchmark 70 Handicap over 1100m at Geelong on August 3, 2018.
 
Giddy Up :beer:
« Last Edit: 2019-Dec-19, 06:33 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-May-20, 10:12 AM Reply #152 »
Derby winner's irregularity confirmed

Carl Di Iorio@CDi_Iorio

18 May, 2020



A stewards' inquiry exploring the circumstances behind the Scott Brunton-trained Vamos Raffa returning a swab irregularity before winning the Tasmanian Derby is imminent.

Vamos Raffa's swab irregularity comes from a pre-race blood test taken before he secured his only victory from eight starts in the $150,000 Listed Schweppes Tasmanian Derby (2200m) at Hobart on February 1.

Tasmania's chief steward Scott Quill told Racing.com on Monday that the B-sample test result had confirmed the findings from the original swab irregularity.

Quill added that no date had been set but that the intention is to finalise a hearing time with Brunton before the end of this week.

"We'll hold an inquiry and gather evidence before any charges are laid," Qull said.

Vamos Raffa won the Tasmanian Derby by two lengths from Skyt, who is trained by Vamos Raffa's original conditioner Richard Laming, who now faces the prospect of being promoted to first.

News of Vamos Raffa swab result continues a turbulent period for Brunton, who appeared in a Hobart court facing multiple charges related to drugs and firearms in December. That matter remains ongoing.

Quill said Tasmanian stewards will allow the court proceedings to run their course before determining whether to take any action against Brunton.

Brunton has been Tasmania's premier trainer since 2014/15 and leads this season's premiership with 41 wins, seven clear of his nearest rival with racing in the state suspended until June 13.

Based at Seven Mile Beach, Brunton has prepared five Listed winners this season, including the Tasmanian Derby, and collected his biggest cheque from the period when The Inevitable won the $500,000 Silver Eagle (1300m) at Randwick last October.
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Giddy Up :beer:

Online wily ole dog

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« 2020-May-20, 11:11 AM Reply #153 »
No comments on what the drug was?

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« 2020-Jul-23, 06:26 PM Reply #154 »
Queensland racing: Todd Austin still training winners, five years after brain surgery
Todd Austin was Queensland’s leading country trainer before his world was turned upside down after being diagnosed with a brain tumour. It was a harsh reality check, and gave him a new outlook on life.
Todd Austin was country Queensland’s most successful horse trainer, but having survived a brain tumour five years ago, he feels as if he’s a bigger winner now than he has ever been, even though he only has half as many horses.
Barcaldine-based Austin, now 44, will jump in the float on Saturday and travel the 100km to Longreach and then on Sunday drive another 300km for the race meeting at Emerald.
It’s a way of life for Austin, his wife Toni and sons Tommy and Toby.
And one all of them are very grateful for being able to continue.
Barcaldine trainer Todd Austin is still training successfully after surviving a brain tumour. Pictu Adam Head
In 2015, Austin’s health was in a perilously dangerous position … but he didn’t know it.
Toni knew something was not right, but for a long time doctors couldn’t pinpoint the problem.
“I never tell her, but you have to take your hat off to Toni,” Austin said. “I was going to the races and not having jockeys on and getting all sorts of things mixed up.
“She kept telling people I wasn’t right.
________________________________________“I went to the doctors a few times and I wasn’t with it.
“They (said it was) depression. They gave me these pills and they did absolutely zero for me.
“I went to Birdsville and the night before we left, I was still putting horses on the truck that weren’t meant to be going. It was a nightmare, but (Toni) got through it, thank god.
“It was a pretty ordinary time for her and the kids. She was never happy with what was being diagnosed. She wouldn’t rest until she found out what was wrong.”
Toni kept pressing doctors to look deeper and eventually they discovered a life-threatening brain tumour, which was operated on in October 2015.
“They said it wasn’t far until I was gone,” Austin said.
“I’m very, very lucky I can still sit here and talk to you. A lot can’t.
“I had to learn to walk again and my whole left side didn’t work for a while, but that’s very minor compared to some others.”
Todd Austin, in 2010, has won a string of Queensland country trainer’s premierships. Pictu Peter Bull
At the peak of his training career, Austin had 42 horses in work and won multiple Queensland country trainers’ premierships. Now he has 18 horses and, even though he’s still in the top four or five country trainers, it’s more relaxed than it was.
He still has regular check-ups, but feels in good health and says he leads a better lifestyle, admitting it changed his life.
“Bloody oath,” he said. “My opinion is not much sought after they tell me, but (my health) is good. We stopped and smelled the roses for a while. Realised horses aren’t the end-all and be-all of it all and just enjoy life a bit more.
“I’m doing stuff with the kids. Tommy turns 10 in October and Toby just turned eight. They are right into gymkhanas and they also get involved with the stable.
“Tommy tells his school teacher at the start of the year he won’t be there in September because he will be at Birdsville.”
The famed Birdsville carnival has been cancelled this year, but in 2019 it was a triumph for the family, when Todd won the Cup for a second time with French Hussler.

Todd Austin won two Birdsville Cups with French Hussler, and last year’s Longreach Cup. Pictu Tony McMahon
“It was satisfaction more than anything,” he said. “I very rarely drink now, so I dropped them all down the street, then drove down and picked them back up when they were done (celebrating).”
Austin had another setback last Christmas, when he ended up in Royal Brisbane Hospital for a fortnight with meningitis, but again, he’s made a full recovery.
“It must be that time of year,” he said. “It’s not much good to me! It’s one way to get out of Christmas I suppose.”
The Barcaldine and wider community are consistently in the thoughts of the family after what they did during Todd’s illness.
“It’s amazing what they do,” the trainer said. “You see these little communities and you can never be thankful enough. What they did for me was unbelievable.
“I’m just a normal bloke, I don’t hold any trophies playing football or doing anything great, but people like to help as much as they can and they did in really needy times.”

Todd Austin won two Birdsville Cups with French Hussler, and last year’s Longreach Cup. Pictu Tony McMahon
“It was satisfaction more than anything,” he said. “I very rarely drink now, so I dropped them all down the street, then drove down and picked them back up when they were done (celebrating).”
Austin had another setback last Christmas, when he ended up in Royal Brisbane Hospital for a fortnight with meningitis, but again, he’s made a full recovery.
“It must be that time of year,” he said. “It’s not much good to me! It’s one way to get out of Christmas I suppose.”
The Barcaldine and wider community are consistently in the thoughts of the family after what they did during Todd’s illness.
“It’s amazing what they do,” the trainer said. “You see these little communities and you can never be thankful enough. What they did for me was unbelievable.
“I’m just a normal bloke, I don’t hold any trophies playing football or doing anything great, but people like to help as much as they can and they did in really needy times.”
ENDS

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« Last Edit: 2020-Jul-23, 07:12 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Dec-29, 09:46 AM Reply #155 »
Herald Sun

   
 sportRacing

https://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/superracing/give-us-a-break-trainers-david-vandyke-and-kelly-schweida-reveal-pitfalls-of-night-racing-and-late-programming/news-story/0d1c8f25fce3e95296f0c9516282a253

Give us a break: Trainers David Vandyke and Kelly Schweida reveal pitfalls of night racing and late programming

Frustrated by long hours, trainers are also having trouble finding suitable staff to work and stay in the industry following government rule changes.
Nathan Exelby
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December 27, 2020 - 6:45PM
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Trainer David Vandyke says night racing is taking a heavy toll on stables, plus COVID has drastically reduced numbers of foreign staff.
Trainer David Vandyke says night racing is taking a heavy toll on stables, plus COVID has drastically reduced numbers of foreign staff.

As trainers vent their frustration at the longer hours they are being forced to work, it has emerged that 2020 is proving the most difficult year yet to attract and keep staff in the industry.

Eagle Farm conditioner Chris Anderson has been training 10 years and said it is more difficult than ever to find staff, particularly this year with COVID, where international workers have dried up and Job Seeker has incentivised others not to work.

“We used to employ so many foreign workers. That’s dried up this year,” he said.

“Staff are the most important aspect in racing. They are the number one priority because without them we have nothing.

“If we can’t have good staff, doing the best thing for our horses then we’re in trouble.”

David Vandyke, who spoke about the stresses that come with the long hours in the Sunday Mail, says changes made by the government to work visas have made it extremely difficult to employ international staff, which for a long time have been integral to training businesses.

“The idea behind the visa rule change was to encourage more Australians to work in our industry. But they don’t want to work in our industry and the country people we used to get, there’s a large number of them who have hung up their riding boots and are working in the mines,” Vandyke said.

Chris Anderson says COVID has had a huge impact on the stable ranks despite racing continuing during the pandemic.
Chris Anderson says COVID has had a huge impact on the stable ranks despite racing continuing during the pandemic.

“Where are we meant to get the new wave of staff under the current conditions?”

Anderson, like Toby Edmonds, believes the way of the future is to be able to train at later hours in the morning, negating the necessity for 2am and 3am starts.

“I think the days of having a horse on the track at 4am should be looked at. Why can’t we work it at 5.30 and try to make it more of a normal day for an employee, rather than asking them to do split shifts?” Anderson said.

“At the moment, it’s not much of a life and we need to find a better way forward.”

Racing Queensland is open to this suggestion, but noted it comes down to individual tracks and clubs.

“While participant views on track opening times differ, we need to be open to change and make a career in racing more appealing, rewarding and safer,” RQ chief executive Brendan Parnell said.

“While horse training venues are managed by the race clubs, we are happy to work collaboratively with industry to effect change.”

RACING’S NIGHTMA TRAINERS TIRED OF PUSHING LIMITS

Group 1-winning trainer David Vandyke found himself in hospital this month, ordered directly there by his GP after he had been complaining of chest pain.

He was later cleared of any heart issues, but a question his doctor asked stuck with the trainer.

“The doctor said to me ‘are you under stress and are you getting enough sleep?’ I thought it was a gee-up and there must have been a camera somewhere,” Vandyke said.

The fact is trainers and their staff operate on very little sleep and the stresses that come with the occupation are long and varied and Vandyke said the way the industry has evolved into seven days a week, plus nights is a significant contributor.

“I obviously have a great passion for what I do, but sleep deprivation is a weapon of war. I’m struggling with it,” he said.

“Personally I hate night racing, because it goes against everything that is sustainable within the industry with regards to participants.
Trainer David Vandyke says he hates night racing.
Trainer David Vandyke says he hates night racing.

“If I have a runner late at night, I can’t go to sleep earlier because I know I have a horse running. The adrenaline and mental component around having a runner means I won’t go to sleep until it runs.

“If we are going to have night racing, a lot of the added revenue created by night racing needs to go back into managing the health and wellbeing of those that are putting it on.”

Vandyke is one of many Queensland trainers frustrated by the push for later finishes and desire for more night racing.

Combined with the early morning starts, they say it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep staff and fear it will be unsustainable long term.

Trainers are questioning whether the benefits of the extra wagering revenue attributed to late finishes is worth the cost.

Kelly Schweida is scathing of the Racing Queensland direction and says the staff who have to work later to make it happen, should be compensated.
Vandyke is one of many Queensland trainers frustrated by the push for later finishes.
Vandyke is one of many Queensland trainers frustrated by the push for later finishes.

“They say it’s good for racing. I want to see the figures,” Schweida said.

“Even that extra money, which Racing Queensland describes as ‘gold’, give some of the poor buggers that are digging the gold up something.”

Schweida is begrudgingly accepting of night racing, because “you can plan for that” but takes offence at day races being programmed close to 6pm and only finding out 48 hours prior, meaning staff arrive home by 8pm or later depending on the meeting venue.

“These people have families too and the way it is now, they don’t have any life,” he said.

“Staff are getting very hard to keep and I don’t blame them.

“I’ve lost three in a month and I normally wouldn’t lose three in a year.

Schweida says the situation is the same across the state. He said in North Queensland the problem is even worse because of the vast distances travelled.

“It’s no good having a racing industry if you’ve got no one to work in it,” he said.

“It might be good for racing, but at what price? It is killing the goose that lays the eggs.”
Trainer Kelly Schweida is begrudgingly accepting of night racing.
Trainer Kelly Schweida is begrudgingly accepting of night racing.

The Sunshine Coast’s leading trainer Stuart Kendrick agreed with Schweida about compensating staff who work the hours, outlining how difficult it is to attract skilled workers.

“Getting staff that do want to work those hours and are capable of handling horses is not an easy thing to find,” he said.

“You are asking people to work with horses that can be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, so you need to have people who know what they are doing.

“We know this is the industry we are in and you know you are going to work long hours, most people are happy to put the hours in and don’t want to complain but at the end of the day you still have to physically do it.”
Trainer Toby Edmonds says night racing is not healthy for anyone.
Trainer Toby Edmonds says night racing is not healthy for anyone.

Gold Coast-based Toby Edmonds said the only way forward for a long term solution is to have a specialist centralised training facility.

“It’s not healthy having to start at three in the morning. It’s bullshit actually,” he said.

“It’s a gee-up for us having runners at the Sunny Coast at 9.45 on a Friday night.

“We have to work horses at 3am the next morning and be at the races the next day. I know night racing is good for turnover and everything, but it’s not healthy for anyone I don’t feel.”

Eagle Farm trainer Chris Anderson believes the current schedule is “non-sustainable.”

“I understand it’s probably an evil necessity that is going to happen and I understand there’s a lot of discussion around night racing, but we can’t ask our staff to start at 3am, six mornings a week, work split shifts, then every second Sunday and for them to keep wanting to turn up,” he said.

“Trainers are doing the same thing, but I choose to do what I do because I love what I do. I feel for my staff, their health and their wellbeing.

“To get more participants in racing, we need to make it more appealing.”

WAGERING AND WELFARE IMPORTANT TO QUEENSLAND INDUSTRY

Racing Queensland says it is performing a balancing act of maximising wagering returns to the industry with the welfare of its participants.

RQ chief executive Brendan Parnell said it’s a complex issue as the data clearly shows finishing a meeting later in the day brings a significant boost to industry returns.

“Analysis of data indicates moving a race meeting back by 40 minutes results in a wagering uplift of between 8-10 per cent for that race day,” he said.

“This, along with night racing and non-TAB to TAB conversions, is driving the strong revenue growth which boosts participant payments.

“Our goal is to grow the overall pie which benefits everyone.

“Since 2018, we have grown returns to participants across all codes from $174 million to $223 million and are well on our way to realising our strategic ambition of $250 million. That will be up more than 50 per cent in just three years.

“While the abnormal wagering market is not expected to fully continue in 2021, punters continue to support our twilight and night racing programs which allows RQ to reinvest through increased returns to participants.”

Parnell said RQ is “open to discussion” on how the control body can make Queensland a better place to live and work in racing.

He said the recent 9.45pm finishes were a rarity owing to additional races fitting into the Sky schedule.


“The health and wellbeing of our participants is an important issue and is a matter that all states are constantly grappling with,” he said.

“In Queensland, it is important we continue to provide participants with the confidence to work and invest within the industry, while providing avenues for new staff to enter our ranks.

“There’s not one single solution.
“It requires a multifaceted approach, including our Registered Training Organisation which offers training programs across a range of roles.”

ENDS

Trainers have a good case too early morning starts late night racing and recruiting and training staff plus Covid  RQ won't do anything to relieve the stresses it's all about the bottom line ..there's too much racing and the Gold Coast wants night racing ....trainers could avoid nominating for the night races but in many cases that's where their horses are best suited and they have an obligation to their owners to place the horse where it has the best chance.

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Online fours

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« 2020-Dec-29, 10:10 AM Reply #156 »
Hmmmm,

Seems starting trainer much later in the morning is the obvious thing fr peoples health and enjoyment of participating and also having a life.

Fours

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« 2021-Mar-16, 02:18 PM Reply #157 »
Shock split: Daberning to leave Lindsay Park
Shock split: Daberning to leave Lindsay Park



Tom Dabernig (left) and Ben Hayes after the pair won the Group 1 VRC Oaks with Personal last spring. Pictu Racing Photos via Getty Images
Brad Waters
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Brad Waters
2:11PM16 March 2021
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Major changes are in store for the Lindsay Park operation with the partnership between Ben Hayes and Tom Dabernig to end.

Dabernig has decided to end his time at Lindsay Park at the end of the season on July 31 before moving to establish his own stable.

Another son of David Hayes, former Footscray VFL player JD Hayes has applied to join Ben in a training partnership at the start of the 2021/22 season.

Some owners were informed of the change on Monday afternoon while Lindsay Park released a statement on Tuesday afternoon.

“After five years as co-trainer at Lindsay Park, I feel naturally very excited to take this next step in my career, and just the same about welcoming my brother into the partnership,” Ben Hayes said in a statement.


Trainers Ben Hayes, David Hayes and Tom Dabernig worked in partnership before David Hayes left to train in Hong Kong. Pictu AAP

Dabernig’s announcement ends more than 25 years at Lindsay Park.

“It is a decision that I have not taken lightly and I am extremely thankful for the opportunities that the Hayes family have afforded me,” Dabernig said.

Dabernig held his own training licence while working at Lindsay Park before he started training in partnership with his uncle David Hayes in 2014.

Hayes’s son Ben subsequently joined the pair, making Lindsay Park a three-way partnership in 2016 until David handed in his Victorian trainer’s licence to return to Hong Kong last year.

Ben Hayes and Dabernig combined for more than 100 wins after Hayes senior left Australia, most notably with Personal in the Group 1 VRC Oaks (2500m) at Flemington last November.

Hayes and Dabernig currently sit third on the Melbourne trainers’ premiership with 31 wins.

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« 2021-Mar-24, 07:17 PM Reply #158 »
Eagle Farm trainer Chris Munce is set to serve a three-month suspension, after pleading guilty to charges relating to the treatment of one of his horses.

Munce was issued with a suspension along with a $5000 fine, after he was found to have given Lady Brahmos an injection before she was set to race at Eagle Farm in October last year.

Stewards scratched the horse prior to her lining up in the race, after they learned of the then-alleged treatment.

The four-year-old mare has since been transferred to trainer Stuart Kendrick.

Munce’s suspension period will be from April 2 until July 2.

The trainer was also found to have given 'false and misleading evidence' to integrity officers.

“These breaches of the rules are disappointing and despite the warnings and ongoing pre-race testing, they are an ongoing problem for the integrity of the sport,” acting racing integrity commissioner Mark Ainsworth said.

“Racing participants should be aware we are out there testing, and their practises are being scrutinised so if they are breaking the rules they will be caught,” he said.

In a letter sent to his owners, Munce said he would vigorously contest the penalty.

He said the matter involved the horse being given a vitamin within one day of it racing.

“I consider it harsh and unfair and certainly not in line with similar penalties imposed by stewards, for offences of this nature,” Munce wrote.

“No illegal or prohibited substances have ever been or ever will be provided to horses in my care.”

Munce added he felt the penalty was grossly unfair.

Munce had a heralded career in the saddle, winning all four of Australian racing's majors.

However, his involvement in selling tips in Hong Kong landed him a two-year stint in prison that finished in 2008.

Munce trained his first winner in February 2015, having hung up the race-riding saddle just weeks earlier.

Specific Choice was the first of 303 winners he's trained, including seven stakes winners (according to Racing And Sports).

from somewhere on the net ,

The trainer was also found to have given 'false and misleading evidence' to integrity officers.

i struggle with this bit Mr Munce

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« 2021-Jul-22, 09:31 AM Reply #159 »
Trainer tired of early-morning ways and wants change

BEN DORRIES

David Vandyke.

SICK of being so tired that he often can’t even enjoy the afterglow of victory, Group 1-winning conditioner David Vandyke is stepping up his crusade for later start times for trainers.

“I am always tired and I am sick of being always tired,” Vandyke said. “I will win a race and all I want to do is go home and fall asleep.

“The reasons why trainers used to get up so early, which probably date back to when a lot of trainers weren’t stabled on course and some had other jobs and had to get their horses worked before everyone else’s day started, aren’t valid anymore.

“It’s not healthy to be deprived of sleep and it affects my mood, the way I think, and often it has knock-on impacts for trainers.

“It predisposes us to increase our caffeine intake and our sugar intake. We are more prone to diabetes, obesity, heart disease.”

Sunshine Coast-based Vandyke is in regular dialogue with turf club officials about being able to work horses later.

He said the Caloundra track must close between 8am-8.30am each day because of maintenance and renovation work to tracks.

But he hopes when the renovations finish, track officials will agree to his request to leave it open later in the mornings so he and other trainers can start later.

There is general consensus in the industry for later start times, especially now where working hours are longer than ever with increasing numbers of twilight and night meetings.

Vandyke said even pushing back start times by one hour later could make a significant difference in the life of a trainer.

“Currently I have to get up at 2.15am to get my horses worked in time and then I only get four or five hours sleep, when in this industry am I going to catch up on sleep?” Vandyke said.

“If I started at 5am or something, it would be ideal as that would allow us to sleep in until 4am or something.

“If I get an extra hour of sleep every night, then by the end of the week that is almost an extra full night of sleep I am getting.”

ENDS

Unfortunately the powers that be aren't listening......hard to understand why it's necessary to close the tracks for maintenance when they do ...keep the tracks open for longer give the trainers and work riders stable staff a better life ..and the maintenance starts later why can't they  do that.?


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« 2021-Jul-23, 08:48 AM Reply #160 »
Later starts ‘game changer’
BEN DORRIES


Trainer Chris Anderson.

BRISBANE trainers will have the option of later starting times under a two-month trial period negotiated by Eagle Farm conditioner Chris Anderson, who believes it could be a “game changer” for the racing industry.

A day after Group 1-winning Sunshine Coast trainer David Vandyke stepped up his crusade for later starting times for trainers, Anderson has revealed details of a plan he hatched to cut back on long working hours.

The Eagle Farm dirt training track closes at 8am but the Brisbane Racing Club has agreed to Anderson’s proposal to leave it open until 8.30-8.45am.

However it means far more than saving just an extra 30-45 minutes in Anderson’s working day and that of fellow trainers, staff and track riders.

The training track is currently closed in the mornings for 40 minutes between 5.20am and 6am so it can be re-harrowed with a tractor.

The later closing times in the trial, starting on August 1, will mean Anderson can start working his horses at 6am after the training track reopens.

Anderson, who has three teenagers including twin daughters, says it will make a huge difference in his life and that of his staff.

“This could be a complete game changer,” Anderson said.

“Some of my staff have been doing cartwheels.

“I have been in negotiations with the BRC on this for probably six months, I have been like a dog with a bone about it.

“I have a young family and it is important for me and for them to be there as much as I can.

“This extension to the track’s opening hours will mean we don’t need our riders to have a break halfway through and we can just consistently keep working our horses through.

“My riders will now be able to start at 6am and my ground staff will start at 5am.

“Normally my riders start at 4am and my ground staff start at 3am. It gives us so much more of our lives back.

“With the way things are at the moment, I can’t start at 5am because there is no point in working one horse and then the track shuts down for 40 minutes to be re-harrowed.

“The push back of the track closing time will mean we can start working our horses at 6am and get all our horses worked in time prior to the track shutting.”

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the issue of start times in the racing industry because different tracks around Australia are governed by different restrictions and closing times.

Vandyke went on the front foot earlier this week, saying there needed to be change in the industry.

“I am always tired and I am sick of being always tired,” he said.

“I will win a race and all I want to do is go home and fall asleep.”

ENDS

Some extension is better than none but what's wrong with a 10am finish which leaves plenty of time for maintenance .

Giddy Up :beer:

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« 2021-Sep-15, 08:39 AM Reply #161 »
INQUIRY INTO THE DETECTION OF PHENYLBUTAZONE AND OXYPHENBUTAZONE IN A PRE RACE BLOOD SAMPLE TAKEN FROM EXPAT PRIOR TO RACING AT RANDWICK ON 17 JULY 2021.   Racing NSW Offices                                                                                14 September 2021 Druitt Street Sydney (by Video Conference)  Stewards:  M F Van Gestel (Chairman)   S G Railton   J J Earl           Racing NSW Stewards today conducted an inquiry into the analysts finding of phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone in a pre-race blood sample taken from Expat prior to running at the Randwick race meeting on 17 July 2021. Evidence today was taken from Mr Mark Newnham, trainer of Expat, Australian Racing Forensic Laboratory (ARFL) Science Manager Dr Adam Cawley and Racing NSW General Manger – Veterinary Services Dr Toby Koenig.   The evidence was unable to conclusively establish how of phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone was found to be present in the sample. However, it was determined the most likely cause was contamination from a horse stabled adjacent to Expat in the lead up to 17 July 2021, that had been treated with phenylbutazone.  Charge  Mr Newnham was charged with the following offence.   AR240(2) – Presented Expat to race at the Randwick race meeting on 17 July 2021 and a pre-race blood sample was found to contain the prohibited substances phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone.   Plea: Guilty    Penalty  Stewards issued the following penalty having considered the following relevant matters;    1. Guilty Plea  2. Personal and professional circumstances.  3. This was Mr Newnham’s first breach of the Rules of Racing in over 5 years of training.   4. Principles applied by Stewards when issuing penalties. 5. Relevant circumstances of this case.  Mr Newnham was fined the sum of $5000.  Expat   Under the provisions of AR240(1) Stewards disqualified Expat from its 8th placing in Race 9 – Tax Today Handicap conducted at Randwick on 17 July 2021 and amended the placings .............

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« 2021-Sep-22, 12:33 PM Reply #162 »
Paul Shailer granted trainer’s licence for fresh start i
By Ben Dorries
11:18am • 22 September 2021
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Paul Shailer will get a fresh start to his racing journey, granted a trainer’s license and set to have his first runners at Port Macquarie on Sunday.

Shailer is a former Kiwi who had a 14-year working association with Chris Waller, most recently as his Queensland stable foreman.

Shailer resigned earlier in the year but his pathway to become a trainer was cleared when Queensland racing integrity officials revealed no charges would be laid over a party probe following the Gold Coast Magic Millions.

Shailer told News Corp in March he was hoping to resume a full-time career working in the racing industry which he loves.

Racing NSW has now granted Shailer a trainer’s license and he has 22 boxes at Port Macquarie on the NSW mid-north coast.

It is understood Shailer is keen to build his horse numbers over time, support the local Port Macquarie club and also travel his horses throughout NSW and also south-east Queensland.

Port Macquarie is 400km from Sydney and 510km from Brisbane.

Paul Shailer.

Contacted on Wednesday, Shailer said he was excited to starting his new venture in racing but didn’t want to make further comment until after he had his first runners.

Shailer has three runners entered at Port Macquarie on Sunday, including former Waller galloper Relucent which will race in the Port Macquarie Cup Prelude (1800m).

Since resigning from Waller‘s, Shailer has sometimes been seen at the races in Brisbane where he has saddled up runners for Matt Dunn.



Paul Shailer at Eagle Farm in March, with jockey Michael Cahill. Pictu Grant Peters – Trackside Photography


Ben Dorries


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