How do you become a racehorse trainer? - Trainer - Racehorse TALK harm-plan harm-plan

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How do you become a racehorse trainer? - Trainer - Racehorse TALK

Author Topic: How do you become a racehorse trainer?  (Read 19389 times)

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Offline MagiC~*

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« 2011-Oct-21, 09:30 PM Reply #50 »
Are you suggesting ulcers have adversely affected his horses?

No I am suggesting, JJ used to feed Ulcer Guard to all his horses, because of the way he fed them  ;)

Offline D-G

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« 2011-Oct-21, 10:42 PM Reply #51 »
No I am suggesting, JJ used to feed Ulcer Guard to all his horses, because of the way he fed them  ;)
:no:
You are ill informed

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2011-Oct-22, 12:06 AM Reply #52 »
You are ill informed
Know quite a few people that worked for Johnny DJ, you saying he never used to use Ulcer Guard ?

Offline JBS

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« 2011-Nov-02, 07:16 PM Reply #53 »
I find this post fairly interesting.

I have been training for about 12 months and am lucky enough to train on a property that has it's own track, pool, walkers etc etc.

The simple answer of why horses work early in the morning is track maintenance ... Imagine trackwork being between 1pm and 5pm? Can you imagine getting track staff to work an 8 hour shift starting at 5pm and work under lights (or in the dark!) to maintain the track surfaces - I don't think so. Early mornings do have other advantages as well - especially in summer, much cooler for horses to work early in the morning.

That all being said we do a lot of our track work at home in the afternoons (between 3 and 5 or so) and I don't find it any different, it replicates race conditions (i.e general time of the day they race) and it's much easier to get track riders. We also go to the track some mornings as I feel it's important that the horses are exposed to those conditions as well, especially the babies and horses that are being educated.

The earlier contention is right though - training the horses is the easy bit, it's the owner's you need to train if you want to succeed!




Offline MagiC~*

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« 2011-Nov-02, 08:10 PM Reply #54 »
From your experience, have your horses improved from being worked under "Race Conditions" in the afternoon  :what:

Or, does it, really not matter  :chin:

I don't have a problem working a horse in the afternoon, as all my horses used to work in the afternoon, swimming and walking, not galloping.

The issue I have, is that the scientist, says that a horse should work in the middle of the day, and that it would improve the horse  :nowink:

Offline JBS

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« 2011-Nov-02, 09:11 PM Reply #55 »

Not sure about improving them but certainly hasn't harmed them so I guess you could say it doesn't really matter.

I always try and do my final "serious" hit out before a race (i.e. Tuesday before the Saturday) in the morning.

As far as the scientist goes, well he isn't a horse trainer! I can't see any way that working them in the middle of the day would improve them at all so I would agree with you on that one Magic ...

Offline Falcon

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« 2011-Nov-03, 07:13 PM Reply #56 »
Would have thought mentioning the fact that a high percentage of horses are boxed overnight when in training, they need to stretch there legs by morning (humans have to get some sleep as well you know) - boxes also have to be mucked out, also depends on how many are in training
They are fed after working in the morning, either in a box or yard which may have some grass in it, so they are not necessarily starving all day and whatever hay is left over. A lot is dependant at what level of training a horse is at, as to how much feed it gets and if its racing that day as well
As Magic said tracks can't be used in the from mid-morning if racing is on the day, at the track you train at
Also, trainers & strappers need to be free to travel during the day if going to another track for racing, so other horses need to be settled for the day
Trainers need to free for races, sales, clients, etc, so you can't have them tied up all day training horses - even if they have an assistant, which not all trainers have. Obviously that is dependant on the size of the team
When I rode, we had about a two hour trip to Auckland if we were going there for the races, races started at about 11 to 11.30am, you had to be ready to leave by 8am at the latest. Getting through a team of ten plus horses, I was pretty much jumping from the back of one horse to the next, they had them saddled and ready for me, I'd come off the home track, some of them I could just hop from back to back - certainly kept you fit. So you had to start riding at between 4 to 5am. Coming home could be as late as 6 or 7pm, then you had to settle the horses for the night. Where I worked we did breeding & racing stock and also prepared yearlings, so a lot of the day is taken up working with broodmares, going to studs with them, pre-training & breaking in youngsters, handling yearlings, grooming them for sales. There is a lot more going on all day than just doing track work & going to the races
The racing & breeding industry is not for the faint hearted thats for sure

Man I feel exhausted now  :sweat: .........can't believe I used to do all that   :biggrin:  

Offline winner

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« 2011-Nov-03, 07:49 PM Reply #57 »
From your experience, have your horses improved from being worked under "Race Conditions" in the afternoon  :what:

Or, does it, really not matter  :chin:

I don't have a problem working a horse in the afternoon, as all my horses used to work in the afternoon, swimming and walking, not galloping.

The issue I have, is that the scientist, says that a horse should work in the middle of the day, and that it would improve the horse  :nowink:


Why do you believe the horses subjected to "experimental jet lag" were able to perform 20 seconds longer before fatigue set in?

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2011-Nov-03, 07:52 PM Reply #58 »
Why do you believe the horses subjected to "experimental jet lag" were able to perform 20 seconds longer before fatigue set in?

I would need to see exactly how he ran the tests, but I think there could be some serious flaws in his testing.

The fact he only tested 7 horses was it, and no mention of a control group.  :no:

Offline winner

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« 2011-Nov-03, 08:03 PM Reply #59 »
Ok so you criticize the research without even reading it at the same time you have no understanding of the role light and dark periods play in the biological rhythms of horses. :no:

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2011-Nov-03, 08:29 PM Reply #60 »
Not criticizing it, but not going to believe it, with out seeing how the research was undertaken.

For mine, the research seems very very thin on details, so would be very hard to come to a serious conclusion, on my behalf anyways.


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Offline specialweek

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« 2011-Nov-03, 09:38 PM Reply #61 »
This is more on the breeding side and a problem Australia doesn't have but in Japan most of the breeding is done in Hokkaido, cold and dark for many months.
Thought the piece in the following JRA journal was interesting.

 >>Read Vol. 19 No.5 Journal (PDF / 6.44MB)

Offline Appman

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« 2020-Jan-10, 05:55 PM Reply #62 »
I am starting to read up about getting my trainers license.

I am a very very old man.

But do know fitness.

Online JWesleyHarding

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« 2020-Jan-10, 07:10 PM Reply #63 »
WOT checking his own fitness levels.





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