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Darren Weir - Trainer - Racehorse TALK

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Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-14, 07:31 PM Reply #300 »

There has been stories about video footage and most thought including me it was wishful thinking.



I find it bizarre that at the time of the raids & in the weeks after they went public to ask if anyone has any of the 'rumoured' footage to come forward.  Yet it seems like they had it all along  :shrug:

I know the articles above cast doubt over the whole operation but by sheer scale I couldn't see that being possible, too many horses that would involve too many people.

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Oct-14, 08:19 PM Reply #301 »

DW looks done

Support for DW, posted before the disclosure of a video showing complicity in cruelty, must be disregarded.

If he did it. he is gone for all money -- and forever.

Offline Jeunes

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« 2019-Oct-14, 08:49 PM Reply #302 »
I find it bizarre that at the time of the raids & in the weeks after they went public to ask if anyone has any of the 'rumoured' footage to come forward.  Yet it seems like they had it all along  :shrug:

I know the articles above cast doubt over the whole operation but by sheer scale I couldn't see that being possible, too many horses that would involve too many people.

I think it was a fishing exercise to see what was out there and any guilty parties try a plea deal.

The intrigue is now if RVL leveraged the footage to get a deal with DW or did he just accept he was in big trouble with the jiggers in his possession.

The article from Fairfax implies RVL May have known of the cameras so was it used at all in discussions with DW? Only time will tell.

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Oct-14, 10:05 PM Reply #303 »
I wonder if we'll ever hear the truth Jeunes  :shrug:

Offline Jeunes

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« 2019-Oct-15, 11:40 AM Reply #304 »
I wonder if we'll ever hear the truth Jeunes  :shrug:

I think it maybe similar to the Oliver punishment.

Some of DW’s ex runners are still winning group races too.

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Oct-23, 06:12 PM Reply #305 »
Required to appear for a commital hearing on 14 February 2020.

23 OCTOBER 2019
Horse shock, corrupt betting claims aired
 
By the time Red Cardinal lined up for last year's Melbourne Cup, the Darren Weir-trained horse had allegedly been given electric shocks as part of a protracted and covert regime.

It's just one in a series of explosive allegations levelled against 49-year-old Cup-winning trainer Weir, his former assistant and right-hand man Jarrod McLean, 38, as well as stablehands William Hernan and Tyson Kermond - both aged 31.

The four men face a combined 34 charges, ranging from corrupt betting to conspiring to deceive stewards and animal torture involving the thoroughbred, as well as Cup hopefuls Yogi and Tosen Basil.

McLean, also a trainer in his own right, allegedly placed a corrupt $100 each-way Cup Day bet on Red Cardinal, which could have reaped $5200. His knowledge of the alleged horse mistreatment meant he used "corrupt conduct information" for the bet.

One of the police charges accuse Weir and McLean of conspiring "to cheat and defraud the stewards of Racing Victoria".

Details of the allegations were released by Melbourne Magistrates Court on Wednesday, less than two weeks out from this year's Cup.

Giddy Up :beer:
« Last Edit: 2019-Oct-23, 06:36 PM by Arsenal »

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2019-Oct-23, 07:36 PM Reply #306 »


The horse with the 'red hat' appears to have put one over the jigger-men -- ran last!

Offline Arsenal

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« 2019-Dec-01, 11:14 AM Reply #307 »
Weir bets probed
 
LEO SCHLINK AND MARK BUTTLER
 
Darren Weir
Police study punts on outsiders

EMBATTLED trainer Darren Weir is suspected of using secret betting accounts to place bets of almost $10,000 a race before his training empire ended with the infamous jigger scandal.

Victoria Police and racing authorities analysed Weir’s betting accounts — and those held by associates — from 2001-19, and suspect the former trainer often backed longer-priced runners over his own stable favourite.

Although his average bet size through his TAB account was $845, investigators found average bets he might have made through other accounts were more than $1800.

He is suspected of placing $9200, through an account held by a close friend, on Peaceful State to beat more fancied stablemate Cliffs Edge in the Group 1 Australian Guineas.
Peaceful State, which started at $8.50, finished second.
Cliff’s Edge, a $4.60 favourite, ran seventh.

Authorities are believed to have dissected various elements surrounding 80 races.

Weir, assistant trainer Jarrod McLean and former employee Tyson Kermond face a string of animal cruelty charges after they were allegedly caught by police using jiggers.

The three are due to return to court in February to answer accusations they used the banned devices on Yogi, Red Cardinal and Tosen Basil.

McLean, who could potentially face a life ban after performance-enhancing EPO was allegedly found in his bedroom during January police raids, and Kermond are also alleged to have struck horses with lengths of plastic pipe. Weir, 49, is due to reappear in court on February 14 to answer six counts of alleged animal cruelty against racehorses.

Particulars of the charges include “engaging in the torturing, abusing, overworking and terrifying” of a thoroughbred racehorse, and three counts of “causing unreasonable pain or suffering” to a racehorse. He is also charged with possession of an unregistered firearm and conspiracy to defraud RV stewards.

While it is not illegal for trainers to bet, authorities are concerned about the motivation for Weir’s suspected deception.

According to analysis seen by the Sunday Herald Sun, Weir tended to wait until horses were at least four runs into their preparation and were nearing peak fitness.

Investigators found Weir’s confidence levels in horses contesting their fourth race into a preparation, wearing blinkers and ridden by a “favoured jockey” were higher than normal.

They also discovered the true owners of the suspect accounts bet far less than Weir.

In one case, the account owner would bet between $1 and $5. One of Weir’s suspected wagers was for $4600 each way through the same account.

Another account user would bet between $50 and $100. At times when Weir is thought to have accessed the accounts, the bets would increase “tenfold”.

leo.schlink@news.com.au

ENDS


Giddy Up :beer:


Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Dec-01, 02:36 PM Reply #308 »
Is there a bigger 'non' story than this  :sleep: :sleep: :sleep:

Gee, he has a bet and uses bowlers   :dry:

Offline Jeunes

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« 2019-Dec-01, 08:17 PM Reply #309 »
I think it is the tip of the iceberg for Racing if police think that a trainer backing the longer priced stable runner needs investigating.

There would be a few Sydney stables under scrutiny if NSW Police did the same.

Offline Gintara

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« 2019-Dec-01, 08:19 PM Reply #310 »
I guess to the casual observer it looks like a scandal but to everyday race followers or punters it's just normal.

Offline Jeunes

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« 2019-Dec-01, 08:54 PM Reply #311 »
I guess to the casual observer it looks like a scandal but to everyday race followers or punters it's just normal.

You cynical bugger.   :lol:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2020-Feb-14, 03:25 PM Reply #312 »
Minor Valentine's Day court win for Darren Weir
Minor Valentine's Day court win for Darren Weir

Ben Dorries

11:21AM14 February 2020

It is Valentine's Day and there was a least a little bit of love for Darren Weir as the disgraced trainer had a small win in court.

The Melbourne Cup-winning trainer and two other men – Jarrod McLean and William Hernan – faced the Melbourne Magistrates Court where they applied for a court venue change for charges they are facing.

Co-accused Tyson Kermond is currently on honeymoon in Queensland but he was also part of the Magistrates Court application which was heard at the County Court premises in Melbourne on Friday.

Weir submitted through his legal counsel Tony Hargreaves that a string of charges he is facing, including animal cruelty and conspiracy to defraud stewards, should be heard in Ballarat rather than Melbourne.

The argument was the offences, including the alleged use of shock devices to torture, abuse, terrify and overwork horses, allegedly took place in Ballarat and Warrnambool and those places were where Weir's businesses were based at the time.

Police had argued the cases should be heard in Melbourne because some of the horses that were part of the alleged conspiracy to defraud stewards ran in Melbourne.

However Hargreaves argued that even the nominations of Weir horses for races was done from Ballarat or Warrnambool - not Melbourne.

Magistrate Sarah Leighfield ruled in favour of Weir and his co-accused, saying she was not satisfied that any alleged conspiracy happened in Melbourne and that Ballarat was the appropriate place for the ongoing court cases.

Weir, dressed in a grey suit and tie, stood in court as Magistrate Leighfield ordered him to appear at a two-day committal hearing starting in Ballarat on June 23.

Weir's co-accused will next appear in Ballarat for a committal mention of the matters against them on March 5.

A court application by members of the media, including Racenet, to access video, photo and other evidence in the case against the men was refused by Magistrate Leighfield.

She said much of the material requested by the media on Friday was "not properly before the court" at this stage.


Weir was disqualified for four years by Racing Victoria last February after he offered no explanation for three electric shock devices (jiggers) being found hidden in his master bedroom.

McLean is alleged to have used poly pipes and electric shock devices on Red Cardinal and Yogi at Warrnambool during the 2018 spring racing carnival, from October 24 and Melbourne Cup day on November 6, 2018.

The barbaric practices were allegedly part of an “illicit covert training regime” designed to deceive racing stewards while giving horses an edge for betting purposes, according to court documents.

Weir, McLean and Kermond are charged with using shock devices to torture, abuse, terrify and overwork Red Cardinal, Yogi and Tosen Basil at Warrnambool on October 30, 2018.

The trio is also accused of conspiring to cheat and defraud Racing Victoria stewards between October 24 and November 17, 2018.

Corrupt bets allegedly laid by McLean during the spring racing carnival included a $100 each-way punt on Red Cardinal in the Melbourne Cup, according to the documents.

Hernan faces one charge of putting a $50 bet on Yogi during a race on November 2 in a bid to win $600, allegedly using information McLean passed to him about the illegal training regime.

The four men face a total of 34 charges.

* Comments are turned off while this matter is ongoing *
Related Topics: Darren Weir

ENDS


Giddy Up :beer:


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