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Offline Peter Mair

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« 2017-Nov-16, 05:40 PM Reply #25 »

It may be helpful for the wily one to have a go at explaining the prevalence of rough results in races over 1400 m at Flemington and Caulfield.

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2017-Nov-16, 05:48 PM Reply #26 »
Given  you, once again, cant explain your claims  of the tamasa race your assertions are clearly bullshite :

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2017-Nov-16, 07:05 PM Reply #27 »
It may be helpful for the wily one to have a go at explaining the prevalence of rough results in races over 1400 m at Flemington and Caulfield.

Um Pete given I know you don't have the balls or racing knowledge to answer my question. I'll answer yours for you

Cup Day  no upsets from 3 races. Punters spot on
Dash for Dollar won. 2nd favourite
Crown Witness won as favourite.
Pedrana won. widely tipped and 3rd fave

Ladies Day . 1 slightly rough result and 1 very predictable win by punters
Tribal Wisdom Greys race and no hard luck stories. Gosford Guineas winner. Won 3 from 10.
 Hellova Street favourite.

Emirates Day. 1 win predicted by punters. 1 slightly rough
Moher equal 3rd fave. Group 3 placed. 7  career wins. 2 wins and 1 placing from 5 goes 3rd up
Kentucky Breeze. Well bred unbeaten. Won in good time only win when 2nd fave



All in all punters found it very easy to identify 5 of the 7 winners

Thus making Your claim of ""a prevalence of rough results"" utter bullshit :bulb:
« Last Edit: 2017-Nov-16, 07:07 PM by wily ole dog »

Offline Peter Mair

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« 2017-Nov-17, 01:00 AM Reply #28 »


Wily  -- I know you are wheeling the barrow to get me set on the RVL board--- but don't make it so obvious, please.

Offline wily ole dog

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« 2017-Nov-17, 03:54 PM Reply #29 »
Oh Pete. Yes you are being put front and centre. Your lies, self interest and dishonesty is on show for all to see :beer:

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Jan-10, 09:23 PM Reply #30 »
Smerdon charges just the start of another long integrity saga
By Bren O'Brien 10 hours ago
Robert Smerdon is one of eight people chargedImage: Getty Images
Comment: For the third time in six years, Victorian racing faces a major scandal involving some of its most high-profile participants.

The charges against Robert Smerdon and his cohorts are serious and involve the raceday treatment of horses for over seven years.

The fiasco over the cobalt charges involving Danny O’Brien and Mark Kavanagh is a reminder that the presumption of innocence always prevails until the judicial process reaches its end.

Remarkably that case is still ongoing, with O’Brien and Kavanagh to face VCAT on presentation charges later this month, over three years since they and Peter Moody were first informed their horses had tested positive to excessive levels of cobalt.

If anyone knows the difficulty of prosecuting serious charges it is Racing Victoria, who have had a hard time of getting the rulings of the RAD Board upheld by VCAT and related courts in recent years.

The cobalt prosecutions have turned into a costly debacle, with everything from the science behind the law to the competency of integrity staff put on trial.



Danny O'Brien and Mark Kavangah have fought their cobalt charges all the way (Getty images)

Prior to that, RV was put through a lengthy legal process with former trainer Mark Riley, who initially successfully argued in the Supreme Court that a three-year ban on him over elevated TCO2 levels should not stand. RV eventually won that case in the Court of Appeal, but that occurred some 18 months after Riley was initially suspended.

While the cobalt case was argued over the definition of administration, the Riley case was a debate about rounding and the margin of error that should be accounted for.

Where the case against Smerdon and co differs is that RV will try to prove a case of simple raceday administration. There will be little scientific debate involved.

RELATED:
Smerdon charged over raceday treatment
Float driver charged with laying stable horses
Smerdon's career of triumph and controversy

Under rule 178E(1), no person may without the permission of stewards cause to be administered any medication to a horse on race day prior to such horse running in a race.

RV’s integrity team will also tender evidence that Smerdon was engaged in a practice that was dishonest, corrupt or fraudulent, improper or dishonourable, in that he was a party to the administration of alkalinising agents and/or medications to a horse or horses on a race day. That would be a breach of AR 175 A.

This relates to 115 alleged incidents spanning back until June 2010.

The first question asked after the charges were announced on Wednesday was why has it taken seven years? 

The answer would appear to be that when RV confiscated the phone of stablehand and float driver Greg Nelligan, they uncovered what they allege is a historical pattern of behaviour.

Nelligan’s phone was confiscated when the integrity team allegedly found him about to treat Lovani with a syringe on Turnbull Stakes day last year. It is alleged that syringe contained sodium bicarbonate, colloquially knows as a milkshake.

The information received from that phone forms the basis of the charges laid this week. Nelligan is accused of breaching the laws of racing in 123 occasions. He also faces two charges of betting against horses in Smerdon’s yard.

Information gleaned from Nelligan’s phone has also allowed stewards to charge Tony Vasil with seven breaches of AR175, suspended trainer Trent Pennutto with four breaches and Liam Birchley and Stuart Webb with three breaches each.

Tony Vasil, who trained stars such as Elvstroem and Haradasun, is among those charged (Getty images)

Stable staff Daniel Garland and Denise Nelligan also face charges.

So what are the chances the charges stick?

Any legal challenges will no doubt centre on Nelligan and his phone, and whether the alleged historical breaches can be proven based on text messages.

The science of treatment should not be called into question, because any treatment on raceday is a breach of the rules. Unlike the cobalt case, the substance does not matter.

Any argument will likely be over the timing of treatment and whether the correspondence on Nelligan’s phone is indeed a true record of what has happened.

It’s a complex conspiracy which has been alleged and one which should it be put through the courts, is unlikely to be resolved quickly.

Even if, as some have suggested, Smerdon does a Peter Moody and retires, there are seven others who may look to defend their careers.

They deserve the right to do that, but in that case, we could be set for another cobalt-like saga.   

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter ENDS

https://www.justhorseracing.com.au/news/australian-racing/robert-smerdon-facing-serious-charges/425415


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Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Jan-12, 10:31 PM Reply #31 »
Smerdon, Webb stand down and show causes issued
Andrew Eddy@fastisheddy   4:16pm
, (
In a dramatic turn to the Lovani inquiry, trainers Robert Smerdon and Stuart Webb have stood down while another three past and present Aquanita employees have been asked to show cause why they should not be stood down pending the hearing of the race day treatment charges.

In a media release on Friday, Racing Victoria announced that after discussions between Aquanita Racing and Racing Victoria, four Aquanita employees have relinquished their roles pending the completion of the inquiry.

Aquanita Racing on Friday informed Racing Victoria that its employees Robert Smerdon, Denise Nelligan, Stuart Webb and Daniel Garland had agreed to stand down pending an upcoming hearing of the Racing Appeals and Disciplinary Board.

The effect of their standing down is that they will be regarded as suspended persons. They will be permitted to attend race meetings but will not participate in their normal activities as licensed or registered persons.

Show cause notices were also issued to trainers Tony Vasil and Liam Birchley and former Aquanita Racing employee Greg Nelligan who have been asked to submit their case as to why they should remain actively involved in the industry. 

Trainer Trent Pennuto is already serving a period of disqualification after being found guilty of AR 64G (stomach tubing) in August 2017. He was advised that if the charges against him have not been heard and determined prior to the conclusion of his suspension in May, he also many expect to receive a show cause letter.

In a media release on Friday, Aquanita Racing explained the process that led to Smerdon and three other employees standing down from their roles.

‘’After much consideration, being mindful of their responsibilities to staff and owners and in the broader interests of racing, they have decided to stand down from their training duties at Aquanita and within their respective businesses effective, Monday, January 15,’’ the Aquanita release stated.

‘’As well as contacting owners to advise them of this decision, we are in the process of allocating training responsibilities to Rob Hickmott, Henry Dwyer, John Sadler and Nick Ryan.

‘’With these multiple group 1 winning trainers, we have every confidence the horses trained by Robert and Stuart will receive outstanding training and care.

‘’Those charged are entitled to natural justice, which includes the presumption of innocence. It is for this reason we have decided it is fair and appropriate that they continue to be paid pending the outcome of future hearings or changes in circumstances.’’

Racing Victoria’s chief executive officer Giles Thompson said: ‘’It is important to say that all of those charged by stewards on Tuesday have a presumption of innocence, however given the serious nature of the charges the stewards believe this is an appropriate course of action for the Aquanita personnel to have taken.

‘’Under the Australian Rules of Racing, the registered and licensed personnel facing charges can be stood down pending a hearing if their continued participation in racing might pose an unacceptable risk to, prejudice or undermine the image, interests or integrity of racing.’’

As for the show causes, stewards are considering possible action under Australian Rule of Racing 8(z) which states:

‘’Notwithstanding anything contained within these Rules, and not in limitation of any power conferred by these Rules, where a person has been charged with a breach of these Rules (Or a local rule of a Principal Racing Authority) or a person has been charged with the commission of an indictable criminal offence, the Stewards pursuant to the authority delegated by the Principal Racing Authority, if of the opinion that the continued participation of that person in racing might pose an unacceptable risk to, prejudice or undermine the image, interests or integrity of racing may:

(a)  suspend and licence, registration, right, or privilege granted under these Rules to that person;

(b)  prevent any horse owned (or part-owned) or leased by that person from participating in any race or official trial;

(c) order that any registration of the transfer of ownership and/or training of a horse related to that person not be effected;

(d)  make any other direction or order related to the person which is in the interests of racing,

‘’Racing Victoria welcomes Aquanita’s decision and its continued cooperation with this inquiry,’’ Thompson said.

‘’It’s vital that the integrity of Victorian thoroughbred racing is protected while we await the outcomes of the Racing Appeals and Disciplinary Board hearing of these charges.

‘’The Stewards have made no determinations concerning the show cause notices involving Mr Vasil, Mr Birchley and Mr Nelligan and they will be given the full opportunity to put submissions to the Stewards in regards to their own situations

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Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Jan-29, 04:16 PM Reply #32 »
New name for Aquanita Racing but stench remains
Patrick Bartley
THE AGE

Last week Aquanita Racing chairman Peter Howell released a press statement renaming Aquanita Racing as Neerim Lodge.

Remarkably even though they are immersed in potentially the biggest doping and corruption scandal in Australian racing, it's business as usual.

LINK

http://www.theage.com.au/sport/horseracing/new-name-for-aquanita-racing-but-stench-remains-20180128-h0pe2z.html
New beginnings for Aquanita Racing. Source: aquanita.com.au
New beginnings for Aquanita Racing. Source: aquanita.com.au
The horses remain in work, new trainers have been appointed, replacing those who have stood down, and the show goes on.

This unprecedented situation prompted one top trainer to comment: "I should be so lucky, if I was stood down facing corruption charges my business would be gone, just finished."

The fact that the Aquanita business has prevailed has stunned many in racing, none more than those who knew that the Aquanita management fee took a large percentage of prizemoney.

Fairfax Media understands that the current doping and corruption charges relate to more than 120 horses stretching back almost a decade and many of these horses won prizemoney.

Individuals found guilty of corrupt behaviour are dealt with brutally in racing. Training businesses are lost and racing enthusiasts can suffer life bans.

Fortunately this type of corruption is rare but we have seen tough justice dished out in the past with life bans over the Fine Cotton ring-in affair and the nobbling of Bart Cummings' Melbourne Cup favourite Big Philou.

So serious are the charges levelled at the Aquanita employees that  four of them including leading trainers Robert Smerdon, Stuart Webb and stablehands Greg Nelligan and Daniel Garland voluntarily stood down.

The others charged are trainer Tony Vasil and Brisbane based Liam Birchley who were issued with show cause notices and will face a stewards hearing soon.

But in a truly remarkable scenario Aquanita have emerged without a scratch.

They have rebranded their operation Neerim Lodge to distance themselves from the tainted brand Aquanita. But it would seem apart from a name change it is business as usual for Aquanita-Neerim Lodge.

How can this be?

If David Hayes, Chris Waller or Darren Weir were stood down facing corruption charges their entire horse training businesses would be lost.

Aquanita Racing was a management company that promoted itself as  allowing the trainers to train while they took care of the rest of the business.

This wasn't necessarily cheap for the trainers with Fairfax Media understanding that part of the management fee was a large percentage of prizemoney for any Aquanita horse.

At the peak Aquanita had stables in three states and over 300 horses on the books.

The board of directors also included powerful racing identities Mike Symons, chairman of Melbourne Racing Club; Peter Howell, a well known punter; Dr Kim McKeller, Smerdon's vet and on the board of country racing, as well as horse owner and advertising executive David Trussler.

Aquanita chairman Howell and director Symons have publicly stated that they knew nothing of the alleged corrupt practices and Fairfax Media is not suggesting otherwise.

Indeed in a recent press release Howell said it was a difficult time and "the Aquanita brand will be discontinued with the management services to be offered under a new name but integrity, transparency and compliance will continue to be paramount considerations in our operation."

Perhaps these should have always been key parameters because it is a sad indictment on the management company that possibly the biggest corruption and doping scandal in Australian racing history occurred under their watch and involved eight of their employees, 123 of their horses in 123 races over nearly a 10-year period.



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Offline MagiC~*

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« 2018-Jan-29, 05:34 PM Reply #33 »
How is Aquinita still allowed to operate ?

Surely they are implicated in this as much as the trainers ?

They seized one phone, but 8 Aquinita trainers charged ..... how is the Aquinita group not involved in this ?


Offline JWesleyHarding

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« 2018-Jan-29, 08:18 PM Reply #34 »
Sad that the name of such a great horse is besmirched in such activity. emthdown

Offline gunbower

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« 2018-Jan-29, 09:12 PM Reply #35 »
Look you make a great point Magic C.  Maybe "The Integrity Department " whatever that means sees the trainers as softer targets . It certainly looks like that. Are some of the management of Aquanita somehow  the "untouchables " It certainly would appear so. How the heck are they allowed to set up with a new name. Absolute nonsense. Just warn them off till these matters are finalized. Wouldn't that be interesting ?

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Feb-07, 09:28 AM Reply #36 »
Aquanita inquiry 'the biggest'
Andrew Eddy@fastisheddy   6 February, 2018
Racing.Com

The Aquanita inquiry into a raft of charges against eight staff including trainer Robert Smerdon is set to become Australia's largest racing inquiry when it begins before the Racing Appeals and Disciplinary Board on April 30.

RAD Board Chairman Judge John Bowman said at the first directions hearing held on Tuesday that he did not doubt the scope of the inquiry and predicted it would run at least a fortnight as several of Australia's leading racing figures face a multitude of charges.

"This will potentially be the biggest racing inquiry I can remember, given number of charges and number of people involved," Judge Bowman said.

Judge Bowman said the inquiry, which was launched after a race-day treatment inquiry into Smerdon's galloper Lovani, should be called the Aquanita inquiry as he said the case put by the stewards goes well beyond the Lovani incident.

"All involved have some link to Aquanita," he observed.

Group 1winning trainers Smerdon, Stuart Webb and Tony Vasil were charged, along with Queensland counterpart Liam Birchley, former trainer Trent Pennuto and stable hands Greg and Denise Nelligan and Danny Garland.

No pleas were entered on Tuesday.

The eight face a total of 271 counts under multiple racing rules following alleged evidence of race day treatment of Lovani early in the spring.

Racing Victoria stewards claim the case against the trainers and former Aquanita staff revolves around text messages, which allegedly reveal information about possible race day treatment.

RV's barrister Jeff Gleeson, SC, said stewards will allege there was a 'circle of trust' between all those charged.

"The stewards' case will be there was a circle of trust amongst participants, they knew and they knew others did not know," Gleeson said.

Judge Bowman ordered a second directions hearing to take place on March 1.ENDS

The Moody Kavanagh and O'Brien cobalt cases take the prize for the longest and most expensive racing cases in recent memory not even Fine Cotton took this long and VCAT decision on penalty  for presentation charges agin Kavanagh & O'Brien still being mulled over by Garde J.


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Offline wily ole dog

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« 2018-Feb-08, 10:49 AM Reply #37 »
Refresh my memory.
Who actually is Aquanita

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Feb-08, 10:49 AM Reply #38 »
Refresh my memory.
Who actually is Aquanita

Poor man's Godolphin.....

Offline Arsenal

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« 2018-Feb-21, 08:37 AM Reply #39 »
Racenet story on the TCO investigation involving Aquanita trainers and staff compromising text messages about treatment and top ups Liam Birchley gets a mention but surprise that no positives recorded how is it if the horses were treated why didn't they return positives ????

The CM made it a Page One expose.



Exposing the sordid, rotten underbelly of sport of kings
LEO SCHLINK
ANALYSIS

FOR the best part of a decade, the identities of the Moth, Big Boss, Goat and Little Mate were a well-kept secret. The man known as MasterChef was also equally obscure.

Sounding like Underbelly extras, these characters and their activities were known only to a select few. But all figure prominently in what has led to potentially “the biggest racing inquiry” in Australian history.

Aquanita Inquiry evidence seen by The Courier-Mail paints a disturbing picture of alleged long-term doping, much of it allegedly carried out on city tracks at major meetings under the noses of integrity officers.

Eight people, including three Group 1-winning trainers, have been charged with 271 counts of breaching multiple racing rules relating to illegal race day treatment.

The charges stretch from 2010-17

– and the investigation is by no means over. Racing Victoria stewards claim the case against the trainers and former Aquanita Racing staff revolves around text messages, which allegedly reveal information about race day treatment.

Stewards believe Robert Smerdon, Stuart Webb, Tony Vasil, Liam Birchley, Trent Penutto, Greg and Denise Nelligan and Danny Garland were part of a sophisticated doping cabal.

Evidence based on text messages appears to show Greg Nelligan, often acting on Smerdon’s instructions, routinely gave horses sodium bicarbonate “top-ups” at various tracks – sometimes minutes before races.

What prompted investigators to target Nelligan on one particular day

is unknown. A tip-off, perhaps. He

was escorted to the stewards’ room, his mobile phone confiscated and the horse scratched.

Nelligan is believed to have claimed he was a lone wolf, but the recovery of thousands of texts, implicating Moth, Big Boss, Goat and Little Mate soon led to more familiar names.

The evidence provided stewards with a historic road map to allegedly doped horses and tainted wins. And some of the biggest names in racing. Birchley says he will plead not guilty when the Racing Appeals Disciplinary Board hears the case on April 30. No one else has entered a plea.


https://www.racenet.com.au/news/has-the-melbourne-cup-been-tainted--explosive-text-messages-reveal-stunning-new-allegations-in-aquan-20180221?utm_campaign=862402&utm_source=SendPulse&utm_medium=push


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« Last Edit: 2018-Feb-21, 10:00 AM by Arsenal »

Offline MagiC~*

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« 2018-Feb-21, 10:48 AM Reply #40 »
I have been saying for a long time, doping is systemic in the racing industry and by major players and have had long winded debates with some on this forum who continued to protect and stick up for these big names.

Problem is, too many people with power and influence in my once beloved industry, have vested interest with parties perpetrating these offenses and go about trying to alter public perception with, what they are doing, is either OK, or that they were not a party to it to begin with.

It really saddens me, people can be proactive in protecting these people, when it so clear as to what is going on in this industry.

What will it take to truly clean up this industry ??

It will require a massive cull from  the top down, including those with vested interest being outed for real change to happen  :x:

Offline ianb

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« 2018-Feb-21, 11:24 AM Reply #41 »
Very damning evidence indeed.

Will this  be enough for Mosheen to be disqualified from the race 6 and a half years later.?

Offline arthur

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« 2018-Feb-21, 11:34 AM Reply #42 »
Is there a 'statute of limitations' that applies . .

And I ask that in all seriousness

Offline fours

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« 2018-Feb-21, 07:56 PM Reply #43 »
Hmmmm,

Class actions by other :-

trainers

jockeys

owners

punters

bookmakers

for losses sustained as a result of this criminal behaviour.

Fours


Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Feb-21, 09:34 PM Reply #44 »
Messages to others to bet on horses that have been doped?

Has been going on since the first day bookmakers appeared on the scene. The media reports make out that this is all new.

The hard working team of investigators involved deserve some credit.

Rather than a slight on Victorian racing integrity, one could view it as evidence that there are high standards of integrity maintained in Victoria and if you do the wrong thing you will get caught.  :chin:

The media of course will always take the opposite view for a headline.

Offline nemisis

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« 2018-Feb-21, 09:39 PM Reply #45 »


Not surprised by the scale of cheating but the fact that "top ups" could be administered so easily on race day is incredible.

Now at least I can understand why John Sadler was filling Observational up with milkshakes for 3 consecutive days before race day prior to his suspension.
Get him to the races just under the threshold, give him a top up on the day and he is right to go.



Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Feb-22, 01:58 AM Reply #46 »
Statement released by head of RVL, Giles Thompson

“Racing Victoria’s primary objective is to protect the integrity of the sport and to enforce the Australian Rules of Racing, ensuring both a level playing field for all and the health and welfare of all horses competing in Victorian thoroughbred races.

“We are committed to the highest levels of integrity to ensure that those in the minority who seek to breach the Rules of Racing and undermine our sport are detected, investigated and ultimately prosecuted.

“We have invested heavily in enhancing our integrity systems in recent years, including more than $8 million in 2017 to significantly boost the capability and resources for our Integrity Department. This has seen an increase in the number of stable inspections and a greater ability to monitor on-course activity.

“It is our enhanced capability that led to the detection of a licensed person allegedly administering, or attempting to administer, a raceday treatment last October. This resulted in an exhaustive investigation over four months that involved the gathering of a considerable amount of evidence.

“From all of the evidence before them, our stewards issued multiple charges against seven Victorian licensees and one visiting Queensland licensee six weeks ago. In accordance with standard legal practice and in the interests of natural justice, the stewards’ brief of evidence was provided to those charged.

“As this case is scheduled to be heard by the independent Racing Appeals and Disciplinary (RAD) Board on 30 April, it would be inappropriate and potentially prejudicial for me to comment on the particulars of this case, including any evidence that may have been obtained and relied upon to issue the charges.

“What I will say is that the stewards do not intend to issue any further charges at this time based on the body of evidence currently before them. Should further evidence come to light that would substantiate the laying of additional charges then the stewards will act upon that.

“While it is never our desire to be on the front page of daily newspapers for integrity or equine welfare-related matters, we won’t shy away from our role in protecting the integrity of the sport and the welfare of our horses to ensure that the vast majority of our hard-working, passionate and committed participants who abide by the Rules of Racing can do so on a level playing field.”

Offline PoisonPen7

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« 2018-Feb-22, 02:51 AM Reply #47 »
I object to the constant use of the term "integrity" by the head of RVL and some sections of the media.

There is a specific doping episode being investigated - yes a big one - but to me the word "integrity" means something else.

Hands up here anyone who doesn't bet on Melbourne races because they believe the results are contrived by dishonest people (not you Mair).

There is nothing wrong with the "integrity" of Victorian racing.

There is an alleged doping scandal, but the day to day operations conducted by the Victorian race clubs are maintained by the highest standards of administration and codes of conduct. The outcome of this is a good example.

I feel sometimes people empower themselves by latching on to an issue like this and making the problem appear far worse than what it is. Not to mention the irresponsible Australian media and their default behaviour of scandalizing everything to sell copy.

Well done to all those involved in picking this up.

Offline ianb

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« 2018-Feb-22, 07:32 AM Reply #48 »
And anyone would have to be incredibly naive to believe the same is not happening throughout the rest of Australia in some way .

Racing has always had an integrity problem it's just they have been far more successful  in Victoria at finding the problem than in other states recently.

Forty years ago you weren't allowed to race your horse with steroids but there were no tests available to prove that your horse was on them.

So numerous extremely successful trainers used them until the test became available in the 1980s.

Now it's a case of no steroids whatsoever but you can bet your life there are trainers/breeders still using them.


Offline Bubbasmith

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« 2018-Feb-22, 09:06 AM Reply #49 »
Messages to others to bet on horses that have been doped?

Has been going on since the first day bookmakers appeared on the scene. The media reports make out that this is all new.

The hard working team of investigators involved deserve some credit.

Rather than a slight on Victorian racing integrity, one could view it as evidence that there are high standards of integrity maintained in Victoria and if you do the wrong thing you will get caught.  :chin:

The media of course will always take the opposite view for a headline.

As disclosed today some insider leaked to the alleged conspirators whether a horse was to be tested or not on raceday.
PP7 how does that sit with your view that "Rather than a slight on Victorian racing integrity, one could view it as evidence that there are high standards of integrity maintained in Victoria and if you do the wrong thing you will get caught" ?


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